LSE alumni

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    The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power – Book Review

The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power – Book Review

The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power. Shoshana Zuboff. Profile Books. 2019.
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Early this year, Shoshana Zuboff’s The Age of Surveillance Capitalism arrived to herald the new form of economic oppression we have watched creep into our lives. Zuboff, a professor emerita from Harvard Business School known […]

November 10th, 2019|Book Review, LSE alumni|0 Comments|
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    Do six per cent of financial transactions sent via the Swift system really fail?

Do six per cent of financial transactions sent via the Swift system really fail?

In May 2019, Brad Garlinghouse, CEO of a San Francisco based (but Delaware registered) fintech firm called Ripple Labs gave a presentation to the 9th High-Level Conference on the International Monetary System. The small audience included Christine Lagarde (then chairman of the IMF) and the heads of several central banks. He described a problem in the world financial system […]

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    Family business: when succession creates conflict between family and firm hierarchies

Family business: when succession creates conflict between family and firm hierarchies

Succession planning is a vexing issue for family businesses throughout the world. Orchestrating a smooth and successful generational transfer of power is key to family firms’ success — and, in fact, their survival. Research on what makes for successful transition has often focused on the two apparent main actors: the current CEO and the successor.

However, in a six-year research […]

October 22nd, 2019|LSE alumni, Management|0 Comments|

What’s slowing down the European Banking Union?

Many observers believe that implicit bank bailout guarantees were an important driver of the global financial crisis. They also blame national supervisory authorities as another key factor. As a consequence, the formation of the European Banking Union (EBU) was presumably the single-most important institutional response of the European Union (EU) to ensure that taxpayers’ money is not used again for […]

October 8th, 2019|Finance, LSE alumni|0 Comments|
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    Large-scale use of cloud services poses challenges to measurement in economics

Large-scale use of cloud services poses challenges to measurement in economics

Have you tried buying a DVD player recently? If not, you might be out of luck soon as major retailers in the UK have stopped stocking them amid falling demand. The reason is not that people stopped watching videos (quite the opposite), but the rising popularity of online streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime that can be […]

September 5th, 2019|Economics, LSE alumni|0 Comments|

The 2018 trade war: consumers are paying a high price

Over the course of 2018, the Trump administration imposed import tariffs on approximately $283 billion of US imports, with rates ranging between 10 and 50 per cent. In response, US trading partners, especially China, retaliated with tariffs averaging 16 per cent on approximately $121 billion of US exports, plunging the United States into its first episode of large-scale reciprocal […]

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    Not the gig economy: on the immense value of the growing freelancer ‘project economy’

Not the gig economy: on the immense value of the growing freelancer ‘project economy’

Everyone knows about the ‘gig economy’. In fact, the term is so widely used in the media, it can sometimes seem hard to avoid talking about it. But it is by no means the only form of work among the 4.8 million-strong self-employed community, and not enough is understood about the many other forms of freelance work.

A new report […]

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    The DNA of disruption: a nuanced view of disruptive innovation

The DNA of disruption: a nuanced view of disruptive innovation

“The reason why it is so difficult for existing firms to capitalise on disruptive innovations is that their processes and their business model that make them good at the existing business actually make them bad at competing for the disruption.” – Clayton M. Christensen

Disruptive innovation, as introduced by Clayton M. Christensen, has become a powerful way of thinking about […]

June 21st, 2019|LSE alumni, Management|Comments Off on The DNA of disruption: a nuanced view of disruptive innovation|
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    History shows that women’s autonomy leads to long-term development

History shows that women’s autonomy leads to long-term development

Looking at recent growth successes and failures, some of the positive stories of economies were characterised by relatively high female autonomy: Botswana had the highest GDP growth rates of the last decades and had not only favourable institutions, but also high gender equality (Robinson 2009; data on gender equality: Carmichael, Dilli and Rijpma, 2014). Similarly, China and South Korea […]

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    Apprenticeships bring returns for young people with low-medium qualifications

Apprenticeships bring returns for young people with low-medium qualifications

In recent times, there has been a policy drive to increase the number of people undertaking apprenticeships in England and there are plans to dramatically change the post-16 system, which would include making apprenticeships a more important part of it. This raises the question as to how beneficial apprenticeships are to young people currently.

In our paper, we use administrative […]

The value of having a view to a canal

Britain has an extensive canal and navigable river network, which played a vital role in transporting goods from the Industrial Revolution through the 18th, 19th and early part of the 20th centuries. Their use for transporting freight had all but disappeared by the mid-20th century, and many had fallen into disrepair or been abandoned. Since then, the canal and […]

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    Canada’s supply management system: lessons from Britain’s Corn Laws

Canada’s supply management system: lessons from Britain’s Corn Laws

The recent controversy over Canada’s ‘supply management system’ of agricultural protection during the regional US-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement (USMCA) negotiations was a timely reminder of the entrenched protectionism in nations that retain a theoretical commitment to international ‘free trade’. It also indicates that deviations from free trade in many guises thrive in market economies where benefits are concentrated, and costs […]

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    US factories are polluting less, but regulation rollbacks threaten air quality

US factories are polluting less, but regulation rollbacks threaten air quality

In the 1960s, there were worries that U.S. economic growth would lead to increasingly dangerous levels of pollution, and that by the year 2000, air pollution would make cities like Los Angeles and New York uninhabitable. Instead, U.S. air quality has improved dramatically since then. Between 1990 and 2008, emissions of the most common air pollutants from U.S. manufacturing […]

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    What happens with cross-border financial services after Brexit?

What happens with cross-border financial services after Brexit?

As we approach the date for leaving the EU, the government has been publishing a series of statutory instruments (U.K. secondary legislation), on-shoring and amending EU regulations ahead of Brexit. This is being done under the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018. During the past weeks risks in this sector linked to a no deal scenario have increased significantly. However, despite […]

January 18th, 2019|Finance, LSE alumni|0 Comments|
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    Not everyone understands a key part of new EU financial regulation

Not everyone understands a key part of new EU financial regulation

In the past few years there has been a cavalcade of regulations imposed on European capital markets. While most of these changes are observable only to practitioners, some of them have had immediate visible effects for retail investors. One such rule is the necessity for a ‘key investor document’ (KID) for certain investment products.

A principle aim of global regulators […]

November 16th, 2018|Finance, LSE alumni|0 Comments|

Are celebrity women executives good role models for women?

It is well documented that there are few women at the top of organisations. A frequently suggested reason for this scarcity is that women simply lack role models: you cannot be what you cannot see. However, although there may be few senior women who might function as role models in women’s immediate organisational environment, the number of celebrity businesswomen […]

October 22nd, 2018|Gender, LSE alumni|0 Comments|
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    The jury is in on cannabis legalisation in North America: it’s been a success

The jury is in on cannabis legalisation in North America: it’s been a success

Recently on the LSE USAPP blog, Wayne Hall wrote on the effects of legalized cannabis in North America, arguing that the, ‘jury is still out’ on whether legalization of cannabis has been a good thing. Hall’s analysis focused on issues of youth consumption, dependence, and the potential substitution of alcohol for cannabis. These are his areas of specialization and his assertions […]

October 13th, 2018|Economics, LSE alumni|0 Comments|
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    Is EU regulation of high frequency trading stringent enough?

Is EU regulation of high frequency trading stringent enough?

High frequency trading (HFT) activity has increased over recent years. In a recent paper, Rene Carmona and Kevin Webster claimed that about 70 per cent of all the transactions in the US equity market were carried out using this tool in 2010, although it is now thought that the percentage in recent years has declined somewhat to around 50-60 […]

October 8th, 2018|LSE alumni|0 Comments|

How to help women sustain careers in male-dominated spaces

While women have made substantial inroads into the world of work and organisational hierarchies, many science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) related fields such as engineering, still appear stubbornly resistant to gender diversity. Even from the perspective of many of the women who actually work in these industries.

Despite the best efforts of many firms, gender equality in terms of […]

August 28th, 2018|Gender, LSE alumni|0 Comments|
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    Why does public investment contribute little to GDP growth in Italy?

Why does public investment contribute little to GDP growth in Italy?

“Give me a fulcrum and a lever long enough, and I shall move the world” – so the great Greek mathematician Archimedes used to say. In the Italian macroeconomic context, many are similarly convinced that if only we pushed more on the fiscal lever, we could set in motion an economy that has stagnated for almost 20 years, and […]