Hidden LSE

Posts about the lesser known and quirky side of LSE’s history.

The Unregistered History of LSE

Catherine McIntyre introduces the LSE/Unregistered collection, an archive of LSE’s own history that is available to researchers using the archives at LSE.

As well as holding the archives of external collections from organisations and individuals, LSE Library also holds the historical records of LSE itself. LSE/UNREGISTERED contains a wide variety of documents that are outside of the School’s administrative system and therefore not […]

Sporting prowess – The Ernest Cornwall Cup

The Ernest Cornwall Cup is a reminder of sporting prowess at LSE in the 1930s-1960s, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly.

Sport was a significant aspect of LSE life between the two world wars. William Beveridge, LSE Director from 1919-1937, was a keen badminton and tennis player and oversaw the purchase of the School’s sports ground at New Malden, with the […]

  • View of a Train of Carriages Drawn by a Locomotive Steam Engine on a Railway by Charles Vignoles
    Permalink View of a Train of Carriages Drawn by a Locomotive Steam Engine on a Railway by Charles VignolesGallery

    Novelty – View of a Train of Carriages Drawn by a Locomotive Steam Engine on a Railway

Novelty – View of a Train of Carriages Drawn by a Locomotive Steam Engine on a Railway

Not all of LSE’s art works are on public display. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly explores the School’s connection with railway art and this 19th century lithograph of a railway scene.

View of a Train of Carriages Drawn by a Locomotive Steam Engine on a Railway was published in around 1830. The lithograph was printed by R Martin of 124 High Holborn, […]

LSE in the American Century

There has long been has been an overlap between the history of LSE and the USA, often personified in well-known individuals like JFK and Rockefeller. In this episode of podcast series The Ballpark, LSE’s United States Centre uncovers the real relationship between Americans, London and LSE.

 

Professor Michael Cox, Director of LSE IDEAS, believes LSE has helped shape the United States, and in turn Americans have […]

  • Bob Mellors
    Permalink Bob MellorsGallery

    Sociology and the Gay Liberation Front – Bob Mellors at LSE

Sociology and the Gay Liberation Front – Bob Mellors at LSE

On 14 October 1970 the first UK meeting of the Gay Liberation Front was held in an LSE classroom. The room was booked by Bob Mellors, a second year Sociology student. The story is told by LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly.

Bob Mellors was born on 28 October 1949 and came to LSE from Bramcote Hill Grammar School in Nottingham doing […]

  • Glad to be Gay banner, LSE archives
    Permalink Gallery

    Glad to be gay – the Hall-Carpenter Archives at LSE Library

Glad to be gay – the Hall-Carpenter Archives at LSE Library

LSE Library has been home to the Hall-Carpenter Archives since 1988. It’s an extensive collection of archives, ephemera and printed material documenting the development of gay activism in the UK since the 1950s. But how did it come to LSE and what does it hold? Curator Gillian Murphy introduces the collection. Visit the free exhibition Glad to be Gay.

 
The origins
The […]

The world below – archaeology at LSE

LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly writes about this Spring’s archaeological dig on Houghton Street at LSE.

London’s many building sites are the source of frequent disruption and irritation but they also provide opportunities to find out more about the history hidden beneath the buildings and streets. The preparatory works for the Centre Buildings Redevelopment was an opportunity to discover what lies […]

August 26th, 2016|Hidden LSE, Places|1 Comment|

The ‘hidden’ women of LSE

LSE Centennial Professor Mary Evans charts the history of women at LSE and the changing attitudes towards gender in higher education and society that occurred throughout LSE’s early decades. 

LSE opened in 1895 and among its famous founders were Beatrice Webb and Sidney Webb. Much less well known among those who contributed to the funds for the School was Charlotte Payne Townshend, the wife of George Bernard […]

Making an LSE oral history

Clara Cook shares her experience making an LSE oral history. The Tales from Houghton Street podcast and collection are now available at LSE’s Digital Library. 

The first recording I ever made of someone’s voice was when I was 2 years old. I held out a tape recorder to my mother and asked her to say the words ‘peanut butter.’ Since then I have […]

LSE on the big and the small screen

Sir Mark Spencer, special advisor to the Prime Minister: [intending to dupe Hacker into taking a thankless job] But Sir Humphrey Appleby is bound to tell Hacker he’d be crazy to take it on.

Sir Arnold Robinson, Cabinet Secretary: Yes. “Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes”, I can hear him say. “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts”, roughly translated. Though Humphrey would […]

February 22nd, 2016|Hidden LSE|3 Comments|