Brexit

  • Permalink Gallery

    Empty Bills: The Queen’s Speech was an odd contribution to solving the UK’s problems

Empty Bills: The Queen’s Speech was an odd contribution to solving the UK’s problems

Artemis Photiadou and Alice Park draw on various strands of research to argue that unless a Conservative manifesto is more radical and relevant than this Queen’s Speech, then a future Johnson government will fail to address fundamental issues, many of which have been caused by other Conservative policies.

Though the likelihood remains the Queen’s Speech will be voted down in […]

An asset to Boris Johnson: ideology in Brexit Britain

Despite all the comings and goings at Westminster, and the debatable qualities of the latest Brexit proposal, the underlying ideological dispositions of a large proportion of the electorate favour Boris Johnson and the Conservatives, write Joe Greenwood and Joe Twyman.

In the aftermath of the success of the Leave campaign in the 2016 referendum on the UK’s membership of the […]

Renewing and rethinking bilateralism after Brexit

Andrew Glencross examines some of the key policy challenges that arise from the UK’s need to renew and rethink bilateral relations with a number of European countries after Brexit.

The 2016 referendum fundamentally unsettled the UK’s diplomatic moorings. Up to this point, the UK had treated EU relations as a subset of its broader multilateral strategy for promoting its interests. […]

September 26th, 2019|Brexit, Featured|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Gallery

    The current constitutional crisis is neither uniquely British nor uniquely about where sovereignty lies

The current constitutional crisis is neither uniquely British nor uniquely about where sovereignty lies

While the Supreme Court has signalled its determination to defend established constitutional principles in the prorogation case, a problem underlying recent crises is the idea of national sovereignty, argues Marinos Diamantides. This idea is at odds with the reality of governing nation-states.

Secular liberal constitutionalism rests on postulates replete with inevitable contradictions and paradoxes. Thus, in the UK the rule […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Supreme Court judgment: in law, reason still matters, facts are relevant, and nonsense doesn’t work

Supreme Court judgment: in law, reason still matters, facts are relevant, and nonsense doesn’t work

The Supreme Court decision is a telling illustration of why all populist authoritarians need to dismantle the independent judiciary, writes Conor Gearty. He discusses the importance of the case.

Without question, the Supreme Court decision on prorogation is the finest moment in the annals of the UK’s judicial history. Building on the work of their Scottish colleagues, the Court has […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Labour and Brexit: Corbyn’s ‘neutrality’ on a second referendum is not neutral

Labour and Brexit: Corbyn’s ‘neutrality’ on a second referendum is not neutral

Jeremy Corbyn’s stance on Brexit in the run up to the 2019 party conference is far from neutral and endangers his entire project to transform British politics, explains Eunice Goes.

This year’s annual conference was supposed to be a launchpad from where Labour would show voters that the party is ready to govern the country. Jeremy Corbyn even announced his […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    How to decide whether prorogation was exercised for an improper purpose

How to decide whether prorogation was exercised for an improper purpose

What would make Boris Johnson’s prorogation of Parliament ‘improper’? Anne Twomey argues that the Supreme Court should focus on the fact that the PM has lost the confidence of the Commons – which is a breach of constitutional principle – rather than on the political advantages he might secure by shutting down Parliament.

Prorogation is primarily a procedural exercise which ends […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Civic vs. ethnic nationalism in Britain: lessons from the UK Supreme Court

Civic vs. ethnic nationalism in Britain: lessons from the UK Supreme Court

Elliott Green compares some of the remarks made by Aidan O’Neill QC – counsel for the various MPs challenging the Prime Minister’s decision to prorogue Parliament – with those of Boris Johnson, and explains what they highlight about British national identity. 

In Wednesday’s hearing at the UK Supreme Court Aidan O’Neill QC gave a rousing and wide-ranging opening statement that […]