British and Irish Politics and Policy

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    Preparing British foreign policy for the post-Brexit era: why swift and sudden institutional change is not the answer

Preparing British foreign policy for the post-Brexit era: why swift and sudden institutional change is not the answer

A policy vision backed up by energetic leadership and greater investment will do more to strengthen the institutions of UK foreign policy than hastily introduced institutional changes, explains Nicholas Wright.

Having successfully navigated the general election and with Britain’s formal withdrawal from the EU just a matter of days away, Boris Johnson is believed to be considering major structural changes […]

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    Social mobility at the top: how elites in the UK are pulling away

Social mobility at the top: how elites in the UK are pulling away

The link between geographic mobility and the reproduction of social class advantage is having a powerful effect in British society, write Katharina Hecht, Daniel McArthur, Mike Savage, and Sam Friedman. Based on an original study of changing social and geographical mobility into elite occupations, they explain why the tensions between London and the English and Welsh ‘provinces’ have deep […]

January 22nd, 2020|British and Irish Politics and Policy, Featured, LSE Comment|Comments Off on Social mobility at the top: how elites in the UK are pulling away|
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    Britain’s older industrial towns are lagging badly behind cities, despite low unemployment figures

Britain’s older industrial towns are lagging badly behind cities, despite low unemployment figures

The reduction in UK unemployment since 2010 paints an overly positive picture of labour market trends in Britain’s older industrial towns, write Christina Beatty and Steve Fothergill. They find that these towns – older industrial areas beyond the main regional cities – are becoming places where people live but work elsewhere, which is very different from their original role as […]

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    Young people and the post-crisis precarity: the abnormality of the ‘new normal’

Young people and the post-crisis precarity: the abnormality of the ‘new normal’

Craig Berry and Sean McDaniel draw upon research with focus groups and an online community exercise to examine the attitudes of young people in relation to the apparent ‘normalisation’ of precarity in the post-2008 economy. They find that although young people recognise the abnormality of labour market conditions, they nevertheless fail to see value in conventional forms of trade […]

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    Flybe rescue: why the government may be putting the green revolution at risk

Flybe rescue: why the government may be putting the green revolution at risk

Boris Johnson may be putting the green revolution at risk by aiding regional airline Flybe, writes Tony Hockley. He argues that while Britain led the way in the liberalisation of air travel, current evidence on climate change as well as the rise of the world wide web have transformed choices for regional development.  

The rescue of Flybe from extinction […]

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    Punctuation and rhetoric: the difference between the “the people’s parliament” and “the peoples’ parliament”

Punctuation and rhetoric: the difference between the “the people’s parliament” and “the peoples’ parliament”

How Boris Johnson’s government refers to parliament may come to reveal how deep a commitment it has to constructing a pluralistic claim of a collective UK state interest, rather than a singular populist claim, writes David Judge.

Immediately after the general election, Boris Johnson greeted the newly convened parliament with the triumphalist words, ‘[this] is one of the best Parliaments […]

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    Why did the Conservatives’ large lead in vote shares produce only an 80-seat majority?

Why did the Conservatives’ large lead in vote shares produce only an 80-seat majority?

Plurality rule voting systems have a well-known tendency to exaggerate the seats of the largest party. A full analysis of the 2019 results remains to be completed, but Tim Smith finds evidence that this time around the Conservatives had a modest 23 seat advantage over Labour in terms of two-party bias. The ‘leader’s bias’ advantage was also much smaller […]

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    How the UK’s migration regime negatively affects the lives of transnational couples

How the UK’s migration regime negatively affects the lives of transnational couples

Clive Sealey and Daniel Nehring discuss how the recent changes to UK migration policy have redefined the way that transnational marriages are created and maintained. The explain that, on the one hand, legal and financial requirements can force couples to marry earlier than they otherwise would have, but on the other hand they also limit their ability to function […]