British and Irish Politics and Policy

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    EU migrants contribute to UK public finances, but the money hasn’t gone where it’s needed

EU migrants contribute to UK public finances, but the money hasn’t gone where it’s needed

While migrants’ fiscal contributions could make up for the increased demand on public services, these are currently being used for other purposes, writes Johnny Runge. As a result many people continue to assume that migration is a drain to the economy and to public services.

EU migrants contribute positively to UK public finances. According to recent research, they pay more […]

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    Why reading polls is actually a lot more complicated than it looks

Why reading polls is actually a lot more complicated than it looks

When the results of the European Parliament elections are revealed they will likely be met with the usual assortment of self-congratulation and outcry. Drawing on the work of the LSE Electoral Psychology Observatory, Michael Bruter and Sarah Harrison explain why polling is a lot more complicated than people may think.

Reading polls is a lot more complicated than what many […]

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    The ‘expert cure’: can experts restore public trust in political parties?

The ‘expert cure’: can experts restore public trust in political parties?

Katharine Dommett and Luke Temple discuss the potential for expert-inspired reforms to boost citizens’ satisfaction with parties. They provide evidence that a perceived lack of expert engagement in parties predicts citizen dissatisfaction, and explain the traits that define the appeal of expertise.

Frequently described as unrepresentative, undemocratic, self-interested and divided, it is well established that the public – in the […]

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    Losers’ consent and Brexit: the distinction between ‘graceful’ and ‘sore’ losers

Losers’ consent and Brexit: the distinction between ‘graceful’ and ‘sore’ losers

Why do some voters accept their defeat and agree to a democratic verdict while some do not? Richard Nadeau, Éric Bélanger, and Ece Özlem Atikcan focus on losers’ consent in the Brexit referendum.

In the protracted aftermath of the 2016 Brexit vote, more than 4.1 million UK citizens signed a petition in early 2019 calling for a second referendum on […]

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    The Civil Service’s gender diversity agenda under the coalition

The Civil Service’s gender diversity agenda under the coalition

Daniel Fitzpatrick and Dave Richards examine the patterns of gender representation in the UK Civil Service under the coalition government. They explain why there was a regressive change in the most senior grades and highlight the role of ‘critical feminist actors’ in driving forward gender equality and diversity agendas in Whitehall.

The equal representation of women and men in positions […]

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    Tactical voting in the EP elections: different regions call for different strategies – and efforts may still backfire

Tactical voting in the EP elections: different regions call for different strategies – and efforts may still backfire

Heinz Brandenburg explains that due to the electoral system used in the European Parliament elections, and in the absence of any coordination between the relevant parties, pro-Remain voters are facing a tricky task when looking for ways to vote tactically. Importantly, they would be ill-advised to apply identical tactics across the various regions.

The European Parliament (EP) Elections in the […]

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    Gender and the ‘impact’ agenda: the costs of public engagement to female academics

Gender and the ‘impact’ agenda: the costs of public engagement to female academics

Engaging in public discussion is a crucial aspect of academia. At the same time, female academics often encounter sexist abuse as a result of such engagement. Heather Savigny draws on interview data to argue that while women may seek to actively build impact and public engagement in to their research agendas, the site of interaction between media and academia […]

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    Corbyn’s Labour agenda has more in common with its forbears than is often assumed

Corbyn’s Labour agenda has more in common with its forbears than is often assumed

There are widespread claims that Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership of the Labour Party has entailed a shift to a more ‘radical’ and ‘left-wing’ form of politics. Yet, many of these claims are untested or lack clear empirical evidence. Rob Manwaring contextualises Labour’s policy agenda by focussing on the 2017 Labour Manifesto. He explains how the wider claims about Corbyn’s radicalism […]