U.S. History

Your vote counts when you remember Selma

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Anne Power marched from Selma half a century ago to protest the unequal treatment of black people in America and to fight for their ability to vote. Ahead of the UK’s General Election, she writes that Selma should remind us all that our right to have a say is precious and voting matters. 

Fifty years ago, Martin Luther King, America’s black Civil Rights leader, led […]

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    From Ferguson to Baltimore: The Fruits of Government-Sponsored Segregation

From Ferguson to Baltimore: The Fruits of Government-Sponsored Segregation

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Following the death of Freddie Gray in police custody last week, this week has seen rioting in Baltimore and protests across the country decrying police brutality towards the black population. Richard Rothstein argues that while improvements in police quality are needed, the roots of the unrest go deeper, having been shaped by the history of intentional segregation in Baltimore […]

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    Though facing complex challenges, America’s foreign policy strategy must remain a continual work in progress.

Though facing complex challenges, America’s foreign policy strategy must remain a continual work in progress.

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America today faces a number of complex foreign policy challenges, with few obvious routes towards their successful resolution. In light of this complexity, many may yearn for the clarity of the Cold War, but Daniel J. Sargent warns against this. He writes that the Cold War policy of containment was no roadmap for policy, and that within its relatively loose […]

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    Book Review: Presidents and Their Generals: An American History of Command in War by Matthew Moten

Book Review: Presidents and Their Generals: An American History of Command in War by Matthew Moten

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Matthew Moten looks to trace a history of the evolving roles of civilian and military leaders in conducting war, demonstrating how war strategy and national security policy shifted as political and military institutions developed, and how they were shaped by leaders’ personalities. Reviewed by Jeff Lupo.

Presidents and Their Generals: An American History of Command in War. Matthew Moten. Harvard University […]

What can the left learn from Friedrich Hayek?

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An engagement with Hayek does not mean a capitulation to the market, writes Simon Griffiths. Instead it can provide several sophisticated insights for the contemporary left, in particular on knowledge, the spontaneous order, and freedom. The left’s discovery of Hayek is also significant as an example of how ideologies, such as socialism or liberalism, can be transformed over time.

In an article […]

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    Book Review: Unreasonable Men: Theodore Roosevelt and the Republican Rebels who Created Progressive Politics by Michael Wolraich

Book Review: Unreasonable Men: Theodore Roosevelt and the Republican Rebels who Created Progressive Politics by Michael Wolraich

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Michael Wolraich deserves praise for this lively and passionate account of the power struggle that created the progressive movement and defined modern American politics, finds Michail Zontos.

Unreasonable Men: Theodore Roosevelt and the Republican Rebels who Created Progressive Politics. Michael Wolraich. Palgrave Macmillan. 2014.

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It was not uncommon during the Progressive Era of the United States (1890-1920) to find political journalists who immersed […]

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    America’s chronic ambivalence about Foreign Policy is rooted in its long, geographically isolated, colonial history, and in the powerful legacy of George Washington’s hostility towards “Foreign Entanglements”.

America’s chronic ambivalence about Foreign Policy is rooted in its long, geographically isolated, colonial history, and in the powerful legacy of George Washington’s hostility towards “Foreign Entanglements”.

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President Obama’s announcement late last month that U.S. forces would begin bombing the forces of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria marked a decisive shift towards intervention for his administration. Irina Somerton argues that Obama’s indecisiveness and reluctance to pursue a more muscular Foreign Policy needs to be seen in the context of America’s deep-rooted Isolationism. She writes […]

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    The experience of the U.S. Great Depression suggests parallels between 1920s mortgage lending and the recent financial crisis  

The experience of the U.S. Great Depression suggests parallels between 1920s mortgage lending and the recent financial crisis  

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Bank lending was at the heart of the Global Financial Crisis when it began in 2008, with the collapse of subprime and ‘piggyback’ loans having detrimental effects. Using newly-discovered archival documents and a newly-compiled dataset from 1934, Natacha Postel-Vinay looks at the lessons of the Great Depression. She writes that the prevalence of ‘second mortgages’ (loans which supplemented regular mortgages […]

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    Book Review: Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States by Felipe Fernández-Armesto

Book Review: Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States by Felipe Fernández-Armesto

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The United States is still often thought of as an offshoot of England, with its history unfolding east to west beginning with the first English settlers in Jamestown. But what about the significance of America’s Hispanic past? Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States is Felipe Fernández-Armesto’s book on the Hispanic past and future of the U.S., taking in the explorers […]

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    Five minutes with Felipe Fernandez-Armesto: “Hispanic America is resuming its history after what has been an interval of white, Anglo-Saxon supremacy”

Five minutes with Felipe Fernandez-Armesto: “Hispanic America is resuming its history after what has been an interval of white, Anglo-Saxon supremacy”

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Many have credited President Obama’s election 2012 election victory with his capturing of the vast majority of the Hispanic vote. But do America’s changing demographics mark an entirely new trend, or simply the return of its own Spanish history? USApp Editor, Chris Gilson talks to Felipe Fernandez-Armesto about his new book, Our America: A Hispanic history of the United States, […]

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