U.S. History

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Paul Robeson: The Artist as Revolutionary by Gerald Horne

Book Review: Paul Robeson: The Artist as Revolutionary by Gerald Horne

Share this:

Alongside his fame as a singer, actor and athlete, Paul Robeson was a key political activist whose proclaimed socialism and fight against US segregation positioned him as a target of the US government. In Paul Robeson: The Artist as Revolutionary, Gerald Horne argues that Robeson shows the importance of internationalism in understanding the success of black liberation movements. However, while this book […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Lessons for 2016 from the smashup of the Second Party System and the War of the Whig succession.

Lessons for 2016 from the smashup of the Second Party System and the War of the Whig succession.

Share this:

The rise of Donald Trump has caused many to predict that the Republican Party as we know it is on the verge of self-destruction. But such party realignments are nothing new. In the first in a series of articles on political realignments, Walter Dean Burnham writes that conflicts between the states over slavery and immigration led to the “War […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Historical predictions that technology would bring calamity have largely failed

Historical predictions that technology would bring calamity have largely failed

Share this:

Joel Mokyr, Chris Vickers and Nicolas Ziebarth place today’s angst about technological change in a historical context.

Technology is widely considered the main source of economic progress, but it has generated cultural anxiety throughout history. In a recent paper, we place today’s angst about technological change in a historical context. In particular, we study three prominent concerns: (1) Will technological […]

February 13th, 2016|Chris Vickers, Joel Mokyr, Nicolas Ziebarth, U.S. History|Comments Off on Historical predictions that technology would bring calamity have largely failed|

How Rosie the Riveter led to the 1950s’ Baby Boom

Share this:

The two decades following World War II were characterized by a massive upswing in birth rates in the US and other countries – the so-called ‘baby Boom’. While the traditional explanation of the Baby Boom is that families made up for babies that were delayed due to the war, in new research Matthias Doepke suggests an alternative explanation. He […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The seeds of the Black ghetto were sown in the 1880s, long before the Great Migration.

The seeds of the Black ghetto were sown in the 1880s, long before the Great Migration.

Share this:

More than a year after the tragic shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson Missouri by a white police officer, the influence and legacy of historic racial segregation still looms large in the US. In new research, John R. Logan, Weiwei Zhang, Richard Turner, and Allison Shertzer argue that the process of black ghettoization in Northern cities has roots […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Charleston is a microcosm of how the history of slavery intertwines with the history of America.

Charleston is a microcosm of how the history of slavery intertwines with the history of America.

Share this:

On June 17th, nine African-American members of a Bible study class in the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal church in Charleston, South Carolina were shot dead by an alleged white supremacist. David Wise charts the links between one of the victims, Pastor Clementa Pinckney, and the revolutionary era slave-owner Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, who helped write the Constitution’s Fugitive Slave Clause, which […]

  • Permalink Credit: Gallery

    Eight centuries on from Magna Carta, upholding the rule of law remains a challenge on both sides of the Atlantic.

Eight centuries on from Magna Carta, upholding the rule of law remains a challenge on both sides of the Atlantic.

Share this:

Last month marked the 800th anniversary of the signing of Magna Carta, an agreement between King John of England and feudal Barons, which played a key part in establishing values we know today such as the right to a fair trial and equality under the law. Tim Oliver and Cora Lacatus look at the historical and continuing importance of […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Gilded Age: American Capitalism and the Lessons of a New World Order

Book Review: Gilded Age: American Capitalism and the Lessons of a New World Order

Share this:

The Long Gilded Age considers the interlocking roles of politics, labour, and internationalism in the ideologies and institutions that emerged at the turn of the twentieth century. Presenting a new twist on central themes of American labor and working-class history, Leon Fink examines how the American conceptualization of free labor played out in iconic industrial strikes, and how “freedom” […]

Book Review Symposium: Is The American Century Over?

Share this:

In his latest book, Is the American Century Over? Professor Joseph S. Nye argues that, despite the rise of China, America is not declining. Instead, he writes, we are seeing the rise of the rest. In our second USAPP Book Review Symposium, we present three reviews of Nye’s new book, which were submitted separately and written independently.

Is the American Century Over?, by Joseph S. Nye, Jr. […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Beyond Freedom’s Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery

Book Review: Beyond Freedom’s Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery

Share this:

Born into slavery in rural Louisiana, Rose Herera was bought and sold several times before being purchased by the De Hart family of New Orleans. Still a slave, she married and had children, who also became the property of the De Harts. But after Union forces captured New Orleans in 1862 during the American Civil War, Herera’s owners fled […]

This work by LSE USAPP blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported.