Legal analysis

  • Permalink Saudi women arrive at a mosque in Riyadh.
Hassan Ammar/AP/Global CitizenGallery

    How new technologies are violating women’s rights in Saudi Arabia

How new technologies are violating women’s rights in Saudi Arabia

Christine Chinkin and Madeleine Rees consider the scope and content of International Law at the intersection of new technologies, violence against women and war. 

Saudi Arabia’s denial of women’s rights is blatant, despite its hypocritical accession to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) in 2000. Its apparent impunity from widespread condemnation for its apartheid-like […]

CEDAW, WPS and the UK Government

Reflecting on the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women’s consideration of the situation of women’s human rights in the UK at CEDAW 72, Keina Yoshida explores the synergies between CEDAW and WPS.

Introduction

It has been such a significant week for human rights and WPS, and for what some have termed Brexit and Chexit.  It is a week in […]

March 1st, 2019|Feminist International Law of Peace & Security, WPS in policy|Comments Off on CEDAW, WPS and the UK Government|
  • Permalink Linda Loaiza López Soto giving evidence at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights © Inter-American Court of Human Rights Gallery

    Inter-American Court reaches landmark decision on torture and sexual slavery

Inter-American Court reaches landmark decision on torture and sexual slavery

Christine Chinkin, Gema Fernández Rodríguez de Liévana and Keina Yoshida with the first in a series of posts analysing Lopez Soto and Others v Venezuela, a ground-breaking case concerning gender based violence in Venezuela.

Introduction

In a series of posts we provide a summary and analysis of the ground-breaking case of Lopez Soto and Others v Venezuela. This first post […]

December 6th, 2018|Featured, Feminist International Law of Peace & Security, Legal analysis|Comments Off on Inter-American Court reaches landmark decision on torture and sexual slavery|

Preventing and punishing sexual violence in war post-Bemba

Following the acquittal of Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo by the International Criminal Court, Louise Arimatsu reflects on what steps might be taken to more effectively address sexual violence in conflict. 

Preventing sexual violence in conflict has been a high priority for the international community for at least the last two decades exemplified by the myriad of policy, legal and institutional measures adopted by […]

November 1st, 2018|Featured, Feminist International Law of Peace & Security, Legal analysis, Sexual Violence in Conflict|Comments Off on Preventing and punishing sexual violence in war post-Bemba|
  • Permalink Gallery

    UK in ‘grave and systematic’ violation of rights due to restrictive abortion laws in Northern Ireland

UK in ‘grave and systematic’ violation of rights due to restrictive abortion laws in Northern Ireland

Following a critical UN report on access to abortion in Northern Ireland, Catherine O’Rourke explores the potential for synergies between the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women and the Women, Peace and Security architecture in advancing women’s rights in conflict.

On February 23, 2018, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (the CEDAW Committee) […]

April 19th, 2018|Featured, Legal analysis, WPS in policy|Comments Off on UK in ‘grave and systematic’ violation of rights due to restrictive abortion laws in Northern Ireland|
  • Permalink Gallery

    The conflict in Yemen is testing our commitment to the Women, Peace and Security agenda

The conflict in Yemen is testing our commitment to the Women, Peace and Security agenda

Since 2015, Yemen has been consumed by a conflict that has led to the death and injury of over 50,000 people – a number that is projected to rise considerably. With no end to the fighting in sight, the this post challenges the legality of the UK’s contribution to the conflict in Yemen and, more broadly, its international commitment […]

July 5th, 2017|Featured|Comments Off on The conflict in Yemen is testing our commitment to the Women, Peace and Security agenda|
  • Permalink Gallery

    What is considered the ‘same matter’, matters for women seeking justice

What is considered the ‘same matter’, matters for women seeking justice

In the final post of her series, Visiting Fellow and women’s human rights lawyer Gema Fernández Rodríguez de Liévana highlights the need for a gender perspective to be applied to admissibility decisions.  

 

Admissibility and jurisdiction remain two significant hurdles for applicants seeking to obtain justice in regional and international courts. Often, applications are rejected without any reasons being provided. […]

June 2nd, 2017|Featured, Legal analysis|Comments Off on What is considered the ‘same matter’, matters for women seeking justice|
  • Permalink Gallery

    How a case against Georgia strengthened international standards for tackling violence against women

How a case against Georgia strengthened international standards for tackling violence against women

In the second post of her series, Gema Fernández Rodríguez de Liévana analyses how the X and Y v Georgia decision has strengthened international standards on gender-based violence. 

In my previous post, I discussed the need to incorporate a gender lens into procedural requirements. Here, I briefly set out the facts and analyse the merits of X and Y v […]

May 30th, 2017|Featured, Legal analysis|Comments Off on How a case against Georgia strengthened international standards for tackling violence against women|
  • Permalink Gallery

    The fallacy of gender-neutral legal procedure is limiting women’s access to justice

The fallacy of gender-neutral legal procedure is limiting women’s access to justice

Visiting Fellow and women’s human rights lawyer Gema Fernández Rodríguez de Liévana makes the case for a gender perspective to be applied to legal procedural rules.

This piece reflects on how laws regulating procedural issues, such as admissibility can hamper women’s access to justice. It will be followed by further posts, which focus on the Committee on the Elimination of […]

May 25th, 2017|Featured, Legal analysis|Comments Off on The fallacy of gender-neutral legal procedure is limiting women’s access to justice|
  • Representatives of women's groups meeting with the UN Security Council
    Permalink Gallery

    International law and the continuum of gender-based violence

International law and the continuum of gender-based violence

Gender-based violence (GBV) occurs throughout the world across times of war and peace, impacting women, LGBTQI people, children and men. Joanne Neenan and Professor Christine Chinkin discuss how the continuum of violence framework may influence International Law and the effect this can have on GBV interventions.

Gender-based violence (GBV) seeps into homes, onto battlefields and follows displaced persons fleeing persecution […]

April 6th, 2017|Featured, Legal analysis|Comments Off on International law and the continuum of gender-based violence|