Exit negotiations

LSE Continental Breakfast 1: What can we expect from Brexit negotiations?

In the first of LSE’s Continental Breakfasts – held under Chatham House rules, so participants can speak as freely as they wish – a roundtable discussed the immediate challenges facing the UK as it triggers Article 50. Robert van Geffen distills some of the key points.

Once Article 50 is triggered, the European Council will meet to issue guidelines […]

It’s not that Britons want to have their EU cake and eat it. They just don’t like the recipe

Most Britons want to curb immigration while trading freely with the EU – or ‘having their cake and eating it’. Freedom of movement is regarded by the EU as fundamental to the single market, which is why Theresa May has indicated the UK will leave it. John Curtice explains that the British tend to believe that migration is an unpalatable […]

Squeezed mandarins: the four big challenges facing the civil service

Will the UK civil service be able to deliver Brexit alongside the efficient day-to-day provision of public services and the government’s manifesto commitments? A recent National Audit Office report identified three challenges facing Whitehall – complexity, capacity and feasibility – to which Nicholas Wright adds a fourth: trust. The suspicion that civil servants are not wholly persuaded by the case […]

What would a pro-European hard Brexit look like?

Like it or not, Britain is leaving the single market. But there is still plenty to play for, argues Simon Hix. With a deep and comprehensive free trade agreement, we could limit the economic damage. This probably means accepting some EU regulatory standards and devising a scheme to allow EU citizens to work in the UK (and vice versa) if […]

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    Article 50 may lead to a decisive fork in the road for the UK

Article 50 may lead to a decisive fork in the road for the UK

Article 50 may lead to a decisive fork in the road for the UK. The final Brexit agreement “must take account of the framework for its [the UK’s] future relationship with the EU.” Therefore, the government has two years, realistically eighteen months, to redefine our international relationships. These relationships have a direct correspondence on our economy, creating winners and […]

If you believe Brexit is a mistake, you have a democratic duty to oppose it

Is there a duty to implement the EU referendum result? Not if you believe it to be a profound mistake, argues Albert Weale. We cannot sensibly and intelligibly use the language of ‘the will of the people’ in respect of the referendum result. It is not simply a device for the registering of the preferences of individuals. It must also […]

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    Now Article 50 has been triggered, will the United Kingdom survive?

Now Article 50 has been triggered, will the United Kingdom survive?

The UK has formally given notice of its intention to leave the European Union by triggering Article 50. Janice Morphet assesses what the process will mean for the United Kingdom, writing that with a second independence referendum looming in Scotland, and a difficult picture emerging in Northern Ireland, the British Prime Minister could be soon be fighting on two fronts […]

The Article 50 notification explained in sticky notes

Now Article 50 has been invoked, the UK has two years to reach an agreement with the EU. With the help of sticky notes, Joelle Grogan explains what happens next .

 

 

No more ‘Dear Donald’: what we can glean from Theresa May’s Brexit letter

While not exactly warm, the tone of Theresa May’s letter to Donald Tusk triggering Brexit was somewhat more conciliatory than it might have been, writes Daniel Schade. In particular, it did not rule out the continuing jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. But there was a veiled threat in the emphasis on security co-operation – and the UK […]

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    Not punishment or revenge, but stone-cold sober calculations: the EU will drive a hard bargain

Not punishment or revenge, but stone-cold sober calculations: the EU will drive a hard bargain

Having triggered Article 50 of the EU Treaty, the British government officially kicked off the Brexit negotiations on March 29. Until today, both parties pretended not to give in and instead promised a tough negotiation strategy. Game theory offers one way of testing the reliability of these claims and allowing the negotiations to be seen for what they […]