Exit negotiations

The people’s vote is not the answer to the Brexit riddle

Momentum seems to be building for a people’s vote on Brexit. Phil Syrpis (University of Bristol) argues that it will not provide the answer to Brexit – whether or not the government secures a deal with the EU. Rather, he argues that the calls for a people’s vote are distracting campaigners from making the case for the outcomes they really want.
Numerous people […]

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    Why we must all now be with Rees-Mogg: the case against a sudden reversal of Brexit

Why we must all now be with Rees-Mogg: the case against a sudden reversal of Brexit

All the available evidence suggests that Brexit will be chaotic and debilitating, but the answer is not necessarily to force a halt – unless it is the Hard Brexit devotees themselves who are forced to do it. In this blog, Conor Gearty (LSE) explains that a sudden reversal of Brexit would become the new casus belli. Equally, the government’s current exit […]

Article 50 is flawed: could the ECJ extend the two-year withdrawal period?

The two-year time limit stipulated in Article 50, argues Philip Allott (University of Cambridge), is wildly unrealistic: its drafters never anticipated that a large member state would ever leave the EU. In this legal opinion, he sets out how the ECJ could extend the withdrawal period, thereby allowing the UK to leave in an orderly fashion.
The UK’s scheduled withdrawal from […]

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    No deal, no trucks? What a no-deal Brexit will mean for road transport

No deal, no trucks? What a no-deal Brexit will mean for road transport

What will a no-deal Brexit mean for road transport? Dmitry Grozoubinski explains that come March 30th 2019, UK firms may not be able to transport goods between European Union countries. This means that many British lorry drivers will not be able to work in the EU, and many UK firms will urgently need to become permanently established somewhere in the EU to operate […]

Enough magical thinking. The silly season must stop here

Britain has only a couple of months left to decide on its future relationship with the EU. Phil Syrpis (University of Bristol) says it is time for both the government and the opposition to level with the public about the choices involved. The coarse sloganeering of the past two years will lead to a destructive Brexit unless politicians get […]

The backstop is dividing Northern Ireland. We urgently need new talks

Brexit has become highly politicised in Northern Ireland. A damaging chasm is opening up between the two political blocs, and between the British and Irish governments, on the EU backstop. Mary C Murphy (University College Cork) argues that a compromise formula is possible, but the lack of devolved government means new efforts – and new forums – will be needed to break the stalemate.

In […]

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    Trade will not be frictionless: will a common rulebook help?

Trade will not be frictionless: will a common rulebook help?

The  White Paper for a new UK-EU partnership edges its way around the strict red lines of a hard Brexit in order to address the complaints of business and keep jobs in this country. In a surprise move, it puts forward proposals for services. Monica Horten (LSE), suggests that the ‘common rulebook’  may be a problematic metaphor in an inter-connected 21st-century […]

It’s time for the EU to negotiate seriously

The UK white paper on Brexit should be given serious consideration, writes Guntram Wolff (Bruegel). While it breaks a number of European red lines, it is also an attempt to resolve some issues. The question is whether the EU will be ready to negotiate seriously. Geostrategic considerations suggest that it is time for it to do so.
After the British cabinet […]

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    Two years after the vote, there is little certainty where the UK-EU relationship is heading

Two years after the vote, there is little certainty where the UK-EU relationship is heading

Two years after the vote, there is little certainty regarding the UK’s political and economic future. Brexiters themselves are split between wanting a Singapore-on-Thames or a Belarus-on-Trent. Simon Hix (LSE) assesses where the UK-EU relationship is heading. He argues that despite persisting uncertainty, a No Deal is the least-preferred option of both the UK or the EU27, and hence the least likely. He suggests […]

Brexit’s institutional irony: how the EU has successfully outflanked the UK

The EU has been popularly derided as ineffectual, but it has shown remarkable co-ordination and unity in its Brexit negotiations with the UK. Dermot Hodson (Birkbeck College) and John Peterson (University of Edinburgh) explain how Michel Barnier has outflanked the UK, with both the Commission and the Council presenting a united front.

Before British voters went to the polls in June 2016, the institutions […]