UK politics

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    Economic inequalities in Britain – from the 2008 Financial Crisis to Brexit

Economic inequalities in Britain – from the 2008 Financial Crisis to Brexit

Nicholas Sowels provides an up-to-date account of inequalities in the UK since the financial crisis and explains how the current trends compare internationally, as well as among different social and age groups. Income growth in the UK has been weak since the financial crisis. It is a trend which seems likely to continue through to the early 2020s. But in […]

January 16th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|0 Comments|

Keeping freedom of movement is the top Brexit priority for young people

What are young people’s priorities in the Brexit negotiations? In focus groups held around the country, Shakuntala Banaji and Sam Mejias (LSE) found a majority want to keep the right to freedom of movement and maintain trade links with Europe. They also complained about the lack of political education in British schools, which they felt left adults ill-prepared to vote.

Young people in our focus […]

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    Brexit from the back benches: Have the whips become the straw men of British politics?

Brexit from the back benches: Have the whips become the straw men of British politics?

Last year, 15 Tory backbenchers brought about the government’s first Commons defeat when they supported an amendment to the EU withdrawal bill to give Parliament a legal guarantee of a vote on the final Brexit deal. In light of the controversy that ensued, Peter Wiggins (Learning Skills Foundation) asks whether parliamentary whips have become the straw men of British politics?
The liberal philosopher A.C. Grayling is […]

January 11th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|1 Comment|

Young people are highly critical of Brexit and fear the insularity it could bring

Most young people did not support Brexit and the referendum result left many feeling frustrated and disempowered, write Shakuntala Banaji  and Sam Mejias (LSE). They fear the vote will make the UK more insular and are highly critical of the way the campaign was conducted. In focus groups, they showed a strong understanding of the EU – and want a […]

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    It’s still uncertain how the UK will deliver a ‘successful’ fisheries policy after Brexit

It’s still uncertain how the UK will deliver a ‘successful’ fisheries policy after Brexit

Halfway through the Brexit negotiations and delivering on the promises made to voters in the run-up to the Brexit vote with regards to fishing remains an incredibly tough task. Richard Barnes, Chris Williams, Bryce Stewart, Bethan O’Leary, Thomas Appleby, and Griffin Carpenter write that ‘success’ for the UK will only be possible by working with its EU neighbours and listening […]

Brexit could be an opportunity for the Welsh economy

Brexit could be good for Wales, writes James Foreman-Peck (Cardiff Business School). EU models of regional aid relied on a stand-alone conception of the Welsh economy, but in fact the country is deeply interlinked with the neighbouring English regions and cities. In a European Free Trade Area like the one Britain originally wanted to create, Wales’ strengths – such as […]

Gearty: What does Brexit mean for Citizenship Rights?

Conor Gearty (LSE Law Department) argues that the citizens’ rights issue is going to cause an astonishing subversion of the Brexit project.

This post represents the views of the author and not those of the LSE Brexit blog, nor the LSE.

Conor Gearty is Professor of Human Rights Law at the LSE.

A happy Brexit? We should rather brace ourselves for a dramatic change in our democratic freedom – for the worse

Regional visas could work, but whether they are a good idea is a political rather than an economic question

Should the UK introduce subnational visas after Brexit, so that immigrants would only be able to work in a particular region? Several advocacy organisations and politicians have mooted the idea. The Migration Observatory looks at the pros and cons of such a scheme. Although the regions of the UK have very different labour needs and levels of population growth, the question […]

Britain’s insistence on impact assessments helped wrap Brussels in red tape

The much-anticipated Brexit impact assessments are rather less detailed than many expected them to be. Chris Kendall contrasts the Brexit secretary’s admission that he is ‘not a fan’ of them with the stringent approach the European Commission now takes to financial accountability. Indeed, it was the UK’s insistence on thorough impact assessments that helped to create a culture of propriety […]

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    Why the Republic and Northern Ireland need shared regulatory frameworks

Why the Republic and Northern Ireland need shared regulatory frameworks

On 4 December, the UK and the EU failed to reach an agreement to move on to the next stage of the Brexit talks, with reports suggesting the Democratic Unionist Party had refused to accept proposed concessions on the Irish border. Anand Menon explains why there are strong reasons for shared regulatory frameworks on both sides of the Irish […]