UK politics

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    New tricks for an old hand: getting Brexit through Parliament

New tricks for an old hand: getting Brexit through Parliament

In this blog, Benjamin Martill and Leo von Bülow-Quirk argue there’s still a way to reach agreement on a Brexit deal—but it’ll require Parliament to work in a whole new way.

Here we go again. Yesterday the ‘mother of all parliaments’ inflicted the mother of all defeats on the government, rejecting Theresa May’s painstakingly negotiated withdrawal agreement by a huge majority […]

Believing in a just world helped some Remain voters deal with Brexit

Counterfactual thinking is one of the ways people respond to unwelcome news. Fuschia Sirois (University of Sheffield) describes the coping mechanisms by which Remain voters sought to deal with the referendum result. ‘If only’ thinking – for example, at the thought of a second vote – tended to make them more unhappy, while focussing on the fact that there was […]

The very short history of ‘no deal’ Brexit

When Theresa May proclaimed ‘no deal is better than a bad deal’, she was talking primarily about the long-term UK-EU relationship, not the initial divorce. Craig Berry (Manchester Metropolitan University) explains how, through a combination of opportunism and incompetence, Britain crashing out of the EU has become a very real possibility.

The postponement of the parliamentary vote on the withdrawal agreement […]

January 14th, 2019|Featured, UK politics|0 Comments|

MPs say they won’t allow a no deal Brexit. Can they stop one?

No deal is the default position if the Withdrawal Agreement is rejected by Parliament – but the situation is complex and developing quickly. Omar Salem explains what would be needed for a no deal Brexit to be avoided.

As things currently stand, the UK will leave the EU by operation of law at 11pm on 29 March 2019. If Parliament […]

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    29 March: Brexit in name only or an Article 50 extension are on the cards

29 March: Brexit in name only or an Article 50 extension are on the cards

As 29 March 2019 approaches, either a transitional ‘Brexit-in-name-only’ with an agreement of some kind or an Article 50 extension appears on the cards, according to Dennis Shen (Scope Ratings). Prime Minister Theresa May is currently short of the needed parliamentary majority to ratify her Brexit deal, however parliamentary dynamics will shift to a degree going forward, with the […]

January 11th, 2019|Featured, UK politics|0 Comments|
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    Deal > Remain > No-deal > Deal: Brexit and the Condorcet paradox

Deal > Remain > No-deal > Deal: Brexit and the Condorcet paradox

With the possibility of a second referendum gaining increasing support, what happens if more than two options are on such a ballot paper for voters to rank? Simon Kaye (Project for Modern Democracy) explains the prospect of a Condorcet cycle and considers alternatives. He concludes that, whatever the route taken, there will always be a majority who will find the […]

January 10th, 2019|Featured, UK politics|4 Comments|

Things fall apart: Brexit and the failure of politics

The debate about Brexit has seemed like a bad dream, writes Philip Allott (University of Cambridge). Government and politicians have made it worse than it need have been. It is not too late to complete the debate calmly and reasonably, for the good of this country and for a wider good.

The bad temper – and the poverty of rationality […]

How a second referendum could be the best way to overcome the Brexit impasse

A new vote based on the revocation (or not) of Article 50 would give the UK government a clear signal to proceed in one direction or another, and thus trim down the number of options being touted – most of which are unworkable as things stand, write Maria Dimertzis (Bruegel) and Nicola Viegi (University of Pretoria).
The harsh realities of Brexit […]

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    From Euroscepticism to outright populism: the evolution of British tabloids

From Euroscepticism to outright populism: the evolution of British tabloids

For many years, Britain’s tabloid press has nurtured Euroscepticism. Franco Zappettini (University of Liverpool) argues that during and since the EU referendum, this discourse has become explicitly populist, pitting ‘the people’ against their perceived enemies. 

The role played by the British press – and in particular by the tabloids – in framing the debate both before and after the EU referendum […]

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    Thermostatic public opinion: why UK anti-immigrant sentiments rise and then fall

Thermostatic public opinion: why UK anti-immigrant sentiments rise and then fall

Contrary to popular narratives, there has been a collapse in anti-immigrant hostility in Britain, evident since the run-up to the 2016 referendum. Patrick English (University of Exeter) explains how the success of the BNP and UKIP may have caused this fall and argues that recent changes may be seen as confirming the ‘thermostatic’ character of British public opinion.

The Britain of […]