UK politics

Can we really get a ‘better’ deal?

Theresa May’s plan kicks the Brexit ‘can’ down the road because any Brexit deal will be inferior to the status quo, write Michael Ellington and Costas Milas (Liverpool).

Publication of the 585-page Brexit-deal document was immediately followed by swift criticism of Mrs May’s negotiating ‘outcome’ and a series of cabinet resignations. When academics are asked to examine a PhD student, they are […]

November 16th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|5 Comments|
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    Can Parliament be scared into submission over the Brexit deal?

Can Parliament be scared into submission over the Brexit deal?

As agreement is reached with the EU, Theresa May’s Brexit deal will come before Parliament. In this blog, Benjamin Martill (LSE) breaks down the parliamentary arithmetic and assesses her options.

My Kingdom for a Deal

Theresa May has, at long last, reached agreement with the EU on the terms of Britain’s impending withdrawal from the Union on 29 March 2019. Although […]

November 16th, 2018|#LSEThinks, UK politics|1 Comment|

Always look on the bright side of Brexit

Is there a bright side to Brexit, even for those who voted for the UK to remain in the EU? Nauro F Campos reasons that there is at least one undeniable positive from Brexit: we are now more willing to ask questions about European integration than we were before the referendum. In doing so, our knowledge about economic integration […]

November 15th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|0 Comments|

BRINO satisfies no-one. The Brexit wrangles are far from over

As the cabinet pores over Theresa May’s Brexit deal, where do we stand? Dimitri Zenghelis (LSE) says even if the deal passes ministers and Parliament, the uncertainty is far from over.

In my last post for LSE Brexit, I wrote:
“Looking ahead, the prospects are not encouraging. The ‘agreement’ at Chequers and subsequent ministerial resignations reflect the fact that the time […]

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    The extent of Russian-backed fraud means the referendum is invalid

The extent of Russian-backed fraud means the referendum is invalid

Four separate reports have fatally undermined the Brexit vote, argues Ewan McGaughey (King’s College London). They show how Russia used the Leave campaigns, official and unofficial, to sway the referendum. A case soon to be heard in the High Court will argue that the result should consequently be deemed void.

Four reports from the US and UK on the Brexit […]

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    The ‘Exit from Brexit’ illusion: why the Liberal Democrats cannot capture the 48%

The ‘Exit from Brexit’ illusion: why the Liberal Democrats cannot capture the 48%

The days of the 2010 coalition seem a long way away for the Liberal Democrats. Is opposition to Brexit a ticket back to relevance? Can the party make inroads into the core Remain vote? David Cutts and Andrew Russell explain why this strategy, although logical, is unlikely to succeed.

Brighton was the focal point for the latest attempt by the […]

November 9th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|18 Comments|

One country? No: Northern Ireland has always been treated differently

The DUP’s struggle to prevent special status for Northern Ireland has shaped Brexit negotiations for months, writes Duncan Morrow (Ulster University). At the heart of the DUP’s position is a single, apparently obvious demand: ‘We joined as one country and we will leave as one country’. On the surface, the logic seems impeccable: different treatment within the UK as […]

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    London Calling Brexit: it’s not about Britain and Europe, it’s about Barnet High Street and All Saints’ School

London Calling Brexit: it’s not about Britain and Europe, it’s about Barnet High Street and All Saints’ School

The London Borough of Barnet is one of the five local authority areas selected for the LSE project ‘Understanding Brexit impacts at a local level’. These reports contextualise the Brexit impact studies carried out at a national level with qualitative evidence collected at the local level. In this blog, another in our London Calling Brexit series, Alexandra Bulat (SSEES, University of London) recounts […]

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    Why there should not be another snap general (Brexit) election

Why there should not be another snap general (Brexit) election

Having a general election in 2018 is an exceptionally bad way of solving the Brexit problem, argues Yossi Nehushtan. Not only is it anti-democratic to have an election about a single topic but the result will not reflect the majority will because the first past the post system never does.

The Prime Minister recently denied the option of a second […]

November 1st, 2018|Featured, UK politics|2 Comments|

Great Yarmouth: stories of frustration, hope and Brexit

Great Yarmouth voted to leave in 2016 by a majority of 71.5%. The following year Janosch Prinz (University of East Anglia) talked to some of its residents about their disillusionment with the local economy, a lost sense of pride in their community and country and a sense that EU bureaucracy was hampering the UK.

Great Yarmouth, sitting between the North […]