Book Reviews

In this section you can read reviews of academic books covering Europe and the European neighbourhood. We publish four reviews a month, aiming to cover a wide range of books on all aspects of public policy and politics.

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    Book Review: European Security in Integration Theory: Contested Boundaries by Kamil Zwolski

Book Review: European Security in Integration Theory: Contested Boundaries by Kamil Zwolski

In European Security in Integration Theory: Contested Boundaries, Kamil Zwolski revisits two theories of international and European integration – federalism and functionalism – to show their relevance for understanding the dilemmas facing Europe today. As early integration theories may return as part of current debates, this book will be of use to academics and policymakers, finds Anna Nadibaidze. 
European Security in Integration Theory: Contested Boundaries. Kamil Zwolski. […]

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    Book Review: Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood by Joshua Keating

Book Review: Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood by Joshua Keating

In Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood, Joshua Keating presents five present-day cases of border debates, humanising the issues they raise through personal stories and daily experiences. Covering topics from virtual citizenship to nested sovereignty, this book may rejuvenate the conversation about how countries and borders affect residents when they are neither static nor responsive to people, writes Jennifer Stubbs.
Invisible Countries: Journeys to […]

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Book Review: New Female Tribes by Rachel Pashley

In New Female Tribes: Shattering Female Stereotypes and Redefining Women Today, Rachel Pashley presents the results of a survey of over 8,000 women in nineteen different countries, navigating the reader through a series of snapshots that show how women see themselves around the globe today. While at times engaging in broad brush-strokes in its depiction of four female ‘tribes’, this is a hopeful, […]

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    Book Review: 99 Theses on the Revaluation of Value: A Postcapitalist Manifesto by Brian Massumi

Book Review: 99 Theses on the Revaluation of Value: A Postcapitalist Manifesto by Brian Massumi

In 99 Theses on the Revaluation of Value: A Postcapitalist Manifesto, Brian Massumi offers a short yet intricate economic, cultural and philosophical work that aims to retrieve the concept of value from capitalist power. Through the book’s deliberately fragmented form, Massumi presents a relevant and urgent dissection of the processes by which we are currently shaped, and a hopeful vision of how […]

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November 11th, 2018|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Shock Therapy: Psychology, Precarity and Well-Being in Postsocialist Russia by Tomas Matza

Book Review: Shock Therapy: Psychology, Precarity and Well-Being in Postsocialist Russia by Tomas Matza

In Shock Therapy: Psychology, Precarity and Well-Being in Postsocialist Russia,Thomas Matza offers an ethnographic account that explores the rise of psychotherapy in post-socialist Russia. Through in-depth interviews and observations of psychotherapists working in different institutions across the country, Matza not only probes deeply into their practice and perspectives, but also gives a human face to Russian experiences of flux and transition, […]

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    Book Review: The Proletarian Answer to the Modernist Question by Nick Hubble

Book Review: The Proletarian Answer to the Modernist Question by Nick Hubble

In The Proletarian Answer to the Modernist Question, Nick Hubble offers a challenge to the persistent binary established between modernist and working-class literature in interwar Britain, arguing that the divide reflects a narrow view of political class consciousness. This is an insightful study, finds Stanislava Dikova, that seeks to show how remembering modernist legacies will contribute to the invigoration of political energy and […]

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    Book Review: Bad Environmentalism: Irony and Irreverence in the Ecological Age by Nicole Seymour

Book Review: Bad Environmentalism: Irony and Irreverence in the Ecological Age by Nicole Seymour

In Bad Environmentalism: Irony and Irreverence in the Ecological Age, Nicole Seymour turns attention away from despair at climate change and environmental devastation to instead look at gestures and responses rooted in the comical, the silly and the ridiculous and their capacity to offer sites of resistance. This is a powerful example of humanities scholarship that makes a forceful intervention into pressing […]

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    Book Review: Fifty Years of The Battle of Algiers: Past as Prologue by Sohail Daulatzai

Book Review: Fifty Years of The Battle of Algiers: Past as Prologue by Sohail Daulatzai

In Fifty Years of The Battle of Algiers: Past as Prologue, Sohail Daulatzai not only offers an ode to The Battle of Algiers, exploring the film’s intellectual lineage and its impact upon postcolonial liberation movements, but also argues that its revolutionary logic has more recently been inverted in service of the ‘war on terror’. This is a powerful, thought-provoking and stimulating book, finds Srini Sitaraman.
Fifty Years […]

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Book Review: The Infinite Desire for Growth by Daniel Cohen

In The Infinite Desire for Growth, Daniel Cohen offers a historical and philosophical account of the adoption of growth as a principle and goal in economic theory from the Enlightenment to the present day. While the essays at times overlook the specific historical and political contexts in which the concept of growth emerged and developed, the collection is thought-provoking and will contribute […]

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    Book Review: Nervous States: How Feeling Took Over the World by William Davies

Book Review: Nervous States: How Feeling Took Over the World by William Davies

In Nervous States: How Feeling Took Over the World, William Davies examines how feeling has come to reshape our world today, displacing the role historically afforded to reason and dissolving longstanding distinctions between the mind and body, between war and peace. The book provides a timely diagnosis of the contemporary social and political dominance of feelings over facts, writes Lilly Markaki, while locating hope […]

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    Book Review: Nordic Nationalism and Penal Order: Walling the Welfare State by Vanessa Barker

Book Review: Nordic Nationalism and Penal Order: Walling the Welfare State by Vanessa Barker

In Nordic Nationalism and Penal Order: Walling the Welfare State, Vanessa Barker offers an account of the preconditions that allowed for the recent increase in restrictive migration policies in Sweden. Deconstructing the overly romanticised image of a welcoming welfare state through a longitudinal study, the book presents a sharp, rich and alarming analysis that will be of particular interest to those exploring the convergence […]

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    Book Review: Understanding Central Europe edited by Marcin Moskalewicz and Wojciech Przybylski

Book Review: Understanding Central Europe edited by Marcin Moskalewicz and Wojciech Przybylski

In Understanding Central Europe, editors Marcin Moskalewicz and Wojciech Przybylski bring together 65 contributors from the region to explore the diverse connotations and unique geopolitical features of Central Europe. The book succeeds in showing the heterogeneity of Central European countries and making the complexities of the region more comprehensible for readers, finds Ostap Kushnir.
Understanding Central Europe. Marcin Moskalewicz and Wojciech Przybylski (eds). Routledge. 2017.
Find this […]

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    Book Review: General Theory of the Precariat: Great Recession, Revolution, Reaction by Alex Foti

Book Review: General Theory of the Precariat: Great Recession, Revolution, Reaction by Alex Foti

In General Theory of the Precariat: Great Recession, Revolution, Reaction, Alex Foti aims to bridge a gap in current literature on precarity by integrating the historical emergence, political role and demands of social movements and the precariat into economic theory. While this concise book does not yet offer the ‘general theory’ of its title, it is a brilliant analysis of the composition of the precariat […]

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Book Review: For a Left Populism by Chantal Mouffe

In For a Left Populism, Chantal Mouffe argues that our contemporary ‘populist moment’ represents an opportunity for democratic reinvigoration through the formation of a left populism in the name of radical democracy. The book marks an important intervention, most especially in its work on the political role of affect, finds Matthew Longo, but he remains unconvinced as to whether Mouffe’s vision of agonistic contestation will […]

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    Book Review: Hotels and Highways: The Construction of Modernization Theory in Cold War Turkey by Begüm Adalet

Book Review: Hotels and Highways: The Construction of Modernization Theory in Cold War Turkey by Begüm Adalet

In Hotels and Highways: The Construction of Modernization Theory in Cold War Turkey, Begüm Adalet offers an account of the historical construction of the ‘Turkish Model’ as a manufactured product of American Cold War policy juxtaposed with Turkish domestic politics. Exploring the conceptualisation and execution of modernisation through examples of survey research, infrastructure and architecture, this is a valuable study of the politics of […]

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Book Review: The Language of Brexit by Steve Buckledee

In The Language of Brexit: How Britain Talked its Way Out of the European Union, Steve Buckledee analyses and compares the linguistic features of both sides of the UK ‘Brexit’ debate, placing these discursive techniques in wider social and historical context. Combining an accessible writing style and thoughtful analyses, the book will help open up and advance the academic discussion of Brexit […]

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    Book Review: The Remnants of the Rechtsstaat: An Ethnography of Nazi Law by Jens Meierhenrich

Book Review: The Remnants of the Rechtsstaat: An Ethnography of Nazi Law by Jens Meierhenrich

In The Remnants of the Rechtsstaat: An Ethnography of Nazi Law, Jens Meierhenrich challenges the perception of Nazism as an absence or perversion of legal oversight, instead outlining how jurists and practitioners mobilised and transformed key concepts within German law to support the actions of the Nazi regime. Focusing particularly on the figure of Ernst Fraenkel and his formative work The Dual State – a […]

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Book Review: The Market by Matthew Watson

In The Market, Matthew Watson offers a critical enquiry into what we mean when we refer to ‘the market’ and explores the consequences of allowing one particular interpretation to prevail. Delving into the history of economics, this is a valuable excavation of the emergence and triumph of the market concept as we know it, writes David Dodds, and a call to action to imagine […]

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    Book Review: Policy Experiments, Failures and Innovations: Beyond Accession in Central and Eastern Europe edited by Agnes Batory, Andrew Cartwright and Diane Stone

Book Review: Policy Experiments, Failures and Innovations: Beyond Accession in Central and Eastern Europe edited by Agnes Batory, Andrew Cartwright and Diane Stone

In Policy Experiments, Failures and Innovations: Beyond Accession in Central and Eastern Europe, Agnes Batory, Andrew Cartwright and Diane Stone examine how European Union accession has contributed to institutional and policy change in Central and Eastern Europe and consider whether these diffusions constitute success stories or failures. The collection serves to challenge simplistic binary models, finds Simeon Mitropolitski, showing the often complex nature of policy transfers and diffusion […]

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    Book Review: 1917: War, Peace, Revolution by David Stevenson

Book Review: 1917: War, Peace, Revolution by David Stevenson

In 1917: War, Peace and Revolution, David Stevenson offers a detailed and well-structured narrative of the complex, interlocking events of this fateful year, with an eye to their subsequent impact on the unfolding twentieth century. Stevenson’s masterful account should be essential reading for anyone with a particular interest in the First World War, recommends Benjamin Law. 
1917: War, Peace, Revolution. David Stevenson. Oxford University Press. 2017.
Find this book: 
Last year […]

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