book review

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    Book Review: Gramsci’s Common Sense: Inequality and its Narratives by Kate Crehan

Book Review: Gramsci’s Common Sense: Inequality and its Narratives by Kate Crehan

In Gramsci’s Common Sense: Inequality and its Narratives, Kate Crehan examines a number of core concepts in the work of theorist Antonio Gramsci – including common sense, the subaltern and the intellectual – that can help give precise insight into the emergence and persistence of social inequalities. Drawing on such case studies as the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street movements, […]

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January 22nd, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Memories of the Spanish Civil War: Conflict and Community in Rural Spain by Ruth Sanz Sabido

Book Review: Memories of the Spanish Civil War: Conflict and Community in Rural Spain by Ruth Sanz Sabido

In Memories of the Spanish Civil War: Conflict and Community in Rural Spain, Ruth Sanz Sabido recovers the testimonies of survivors of the Spanish Civil War and the early years of General Franco’s dictatorship from one village in Huelva province in Andalusia. This is a compelling and powerful ethnographic study that gives voice to hitherto silenced experiences of Spanish fascism, writes […]

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January 15th, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Economic Governance in Europe: Comparative Paradoxes and Constitutional Challenges by Federico Fabbrini

Book Review: Economic Governance in Europe: Comparative Paradoxes and Constitutional Challenges by Federico Fabbrini

In this book, Federico Fabbrini outlines the impact of the Euro crisis on the constitutional and legal architecture of the European Union, arguing for a shift from constitutional arrangements rooted in ‘accident and force’ to systems ‘designed on the basis of reflection and choice’. Francesco Costamagna welcomes this as a refreshing challenge to the assumption that movement towards an EU super-state […]

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December 18th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Energy, Capitalism and World Order: Toward a New Agenda in International Political Economy edited by Tim Di Muzio and Jesse Salah Ovadia

Book Review: Energy, Capitalism and World Order: Toward a New Agenda in International Political Economy edited by Tim Di Muzio and Jesse Salah Ovadia

In this new collection, editors Tim Di Muzio and Jesse Salah Ovadia bring together contributors to examine the relationship between energy, capitalism and the world order in light of pressing and emergent issues such as fracking, biofuels and climate change. While more attention on the diverse challenges faced by different political economies would have been welcome, the collection presents lucid analyses […]

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December 11th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: What is Political Sociology? by Elisabeth S. Clemens

Book Review: What is Political Sociology? by Elisabeth S. Clemens

In this book, Elisabeth S. Clemens aims to produce a ‘definitive and inspirational standard text for students at all levels’. Patricia Hogwood writes that her work offers a concise overview of political sociology as the human face of politics: the politicised interactions that take place within and between the domains of family, work, civic culture and structures of government. Clemens presents key […]

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December 4th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: How Europeans View and Evaluate Democracy edited by Mónica Ferrín and Hanspeter Kriesi

Book Review: How Europeans View and Evaluate Democracy edited by Mónica Ferrín and Hanspeter Kriesi

In How Europeans View and Evaluate Democracy, editors Mónica Ferrín and Hanspeter Kriesi offer insight into perceptions of democracy across Europe by examining how Europeans evaluate their experience of democracy and assess the legitimacy of current democratic regimes across the continent. This comprehensive study will be an excellent read for political comparativists and Europeanists, finds Simeon Mitropolitski.
How Europeans View and Evaluate Democracy. Mónica Ferrín and […]

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    Book Review: After the Crisis: Anthropological Thought, Neoliberalism and the Aftermath edited by James G. Carrier

Book Review: After the Crisis: Anthropological Thought, Neoliberalism and the Aftermath edited by James G. Carrier

In After the Crisis: Anthropological Thought, Neoliberalism and the Aftermath, editor James G. Carrier and contributors reflect on the impact that neoliberalism has had on the state of anthropology today. While Christopher May finds a clear account of the sense of crisis currently gripping the discipline, he argues that greater engagement with the field of critical political economy might have helped […]

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September 4th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: The Oxford Handbook of Swedish Politics edited by Jon Pierre

Book Review: The Oxford Handbook of Swedish Politics edited by Jon Pierre

In this new edited volume, The Oxford Handbook of Swedish Politics, Jon Pierre brings together 50 contributors to describe and analyse Sweden’s past and contemporary political and constitutional settlement. Challenging romanticising interpretations of Sweden as an inherent beacon of prosperity and equality, this is a much-needed, well-organised and comprehensive collection that traces the evolution, development and possible twilight of […]

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    Book Review: Foreign Policy Breakthroughs: Cases in Successful Diplomacy edited by Robert Hutchings and Jeremi Suri

Book Review: Foreign Policy Breakthroughs: Cases in Successful Diplomacy edited by Robert Hutchings and Jeremi Suri

In Foreign Policy Breakthroughs: Cases in Successful Diplomacy, editors Robert Hutchings and Jeremi Suri focus on a number of diplomatic successes since 1945, arguing that diplomacy not only functions as an adjunct to force, but also as a means of building international networks of cooperation dependent upon necessary compromise and sustainable agreements. This book offers important insights into the intricate […]

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January 17th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|

Book Review: Citizenship by Étienne Balibar

Citizenship presents a collection of seven lectures by Étienne Balibar, extending his longstanding engagement with citizenship as a concept that is both inextricably linked to, and in contradiction with, democracy. While the text may occasionally lose sight of its central topic of citizenship, Chris Moreh highlights its ‘affirmative’ agenda in the face of contemporary challenges to democratic politics.

Citizenship. […]

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    Book Review: Eco-Cities and the Transition to Low Carbon Economies

Book Review: Eco-Cities and the Transition to Low Carbon Economies

Eco-cities have emerged as a response to the ‘Age of Crisis’ that author Federico Caprotti argues we are living in via his book ‘Eco-Cities and the Transition to Low Carbon Economies’. As Andrew Karvonen writes, Caprotti adopts a study of two well-known projects, Tianjin Eco-City in China and Masdar City in Abu Dhabi, to explore the upside of this […]

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    Book Review: Injustice: Why Social Inequality Still Persists by Danny Dorling

Book Review: Injustice: Why Social Inequality Still Persists by Danny Dorling

The revised edition of Danny Dorling’s book Injustice: Why Social Inequality Still Persists provides an analysis of contemporary issues and practices underpinning inequality and a concise interpretation of the main causes of the persistence of injustice in rich countries, together with possible solutions. Gaja Maestri finds that despite touching only marginally on broader scholarly debates, the book remains a […]

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Book Review: Austerity: The Great Failure by Florian Schui

In ‘Austerity: The Great Failure’, Florian Schui assesses the historical roots of austerity and how it has embedded itself as an idea in modern political and economic thinking. Lee Gregory writes that the historical approach pursued in the book provides an insightful and thought provoking analysis.

Austerity: The Great Failure. Florian Schui. Yale University Press. 2015.

At risk of providing a “spoiler”, […]

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    Book Review: The End Game: How Inequality Shapes Our Final Years

Book Review: The End Game: How Inequality Shapes Our Final Years

Corey Abramson’s book, The End Game: How Inequality Shapes Our Final Years, takes readers on a journey through geriatric inequality to illustrate how the supposed golden years of retirement remain an illusion for many individuals. Michael Warren writes that the book offers an admirable attempt to assess a key question, namely how the provision of services for the elderly […]

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August 23rd, 2015|Book Reviews|1 Comment|

Book Review: Sexual Politics in Modern Ireland

‘Sexual Politics in Modern Ireland’ sets out to explore gender, sex and sexuality using new data to explore stories that have yet to be told, and to add to our understanding of who and what makes up Irish society. Muireann O’Dwyer writes that the book is not a comprehensive overview of the role and experience of sexual politics in […]

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August 16th, 2015|Book Reviews|0 Comments|

Book Review: The Lure of Technocracy by Jürgen Habermas

In his latest offering, The Lure of Technocracy, Jürgen Habermas argues for Europe to continue working toward a closer political union based upon a discourse-theoretical model of politics. Elizabeth Folan O’Connor writes that this model can help the continent reach a place where all the nations of Europe stand alongside each other as equals in a democratically legitimate political […]

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    Book Review: Beppe Grillo’s Five Star Movement: Organisation, Communication and Ideology

Book Review: Beppe Grillo’s Five Star Movement: Organisation, Communication and Ideology

In ‘Beppe Grillo’s Five Star Movement: Organisation, Communication and Ideology’ the contributors cast a critical view over the history and development of the Five Star Movement – from its origins as a small protest movement to its present status as a major political player in Italy. Kally Zarali finds the book provides extensive answers to questions concerning the Five […]

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    Book Review: The Limits of Neoliberalism: Authority, Sovereignty and the Logic of Competition

Book Review: The Limits of Neoliberalism: Authority, Sovereignty and the Logic of Competition

Founded on the principle that neoliberalism has sought to disenchant politics by replacing it with economics, this book asks to what extent economics can provide government with legitimacy. Taras Fedirko finds the book offers a poignant analysis, but that it is less clear on the reasons why neoliberal thinking has managed to win ground in the first place.

The Limits of […]

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    Book Review: Career Behaviour and the European Parliament: All Roads Lead Through Brussels?

Book Review: Career Behaviour and the European Parliament: All Roads Lead Through Brussels?

Career Behaviour and the European Parliament aims to provide a single theoretical framework that can predict under which circumstances an MEP will behave in their career choices: whether they will use the European Parliament as a temporary springboard for a position at the national level, or consider the EP as a long-term career setting. Sara Reis finds the book to […]

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    Book Review: Resolving Cyprus: New Approaches to Conflict Resolution

Book Review: Resolving Cyprus: New Approaches to Conflict Resolution

This edited volume presents a range of perspectives on the Cyprus conflict, with thirty leading experts drawing on their research and experience to assess whether a solution can finally be found to the dispute. Nikos Christofis finds the book to be a welcome addition to the literature on the Cyprus Problem which brings together some of the most important […]

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