book review

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    Book Review: Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine by Anne Applebaum

Book Review: Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine by Anne Applebaum

In Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine, Anne Applebaum offers a new comprehensive account of the Holodomor: the famine that led to the deaths of millions of Ukrainians through starvation in the early 1930s. Drawing on archival documents, written and oral testimonies and historical scholarship, this is a valuable addition to our understanding of this devastating and long-neglected event, reccommends Vlad Onaciu. 
If you are interested in […]

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    Book Review: Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think like a 21st-Century Economist by Kate Raworth

Book Review: Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think like a 21st-Century Economist by Kate Raworth

In Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist, Kate Raworth offers a new model for economics, based around the ‘doughnut’, which values human well-being and advocates for a ‘regenerative and distributive economy’. While the book holds multidisciplinary promise and Raworth draws upon appealing and evocative metaphors and examples to convey economic concepts in accessible terms, Maria Zhivitskaya remains unconvinced of the […]

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    Book Review: News, Numbers and Public Opinion in a Data-Driven World edited by An Nguyen

Book Review: News, Numbers and Public Opinion in a Data-Driven World edited by An Nguyen

In News, Numbers and Public Opinion in a Data-Driven World, An Nguyen brings together contributors to showcase international research on the integration of statistical reasoning in journalistic education, production and consumption. In a data-driven context marked by concerns about fake news, ‘post-truth’ and the spread of disinformation, this is a thoughtful and accessible contribution to understanding the role of numeracy in contemporary […]

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    Book Review: Near Abroad: Putin, the West and the Contest over Ukraine and the Caucasus by Gerard Toal

Book Review: Near Abroad: Putin, the West and the Contest over Ukraine and the Caucasus by Gerard Toal

In Near Abroad: Putin, the West and the Contest over Ukraine and the Caucasus, Gerard Toal offers a detailed geopolitical account of the Russian conflicts with Georgia and Ukraine in 2008 and 2014 respectively. While questioning some aspects of the book’s analysis, April Curtis welcomes this as a highly nuanced work that will enable readers to have a deeper awareness of how Russia views its role in […]

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    Book Review: Republic of Islamophobia: The Rise of Respectable Racism in France by Jim Wolfreys

Book Review: Republic of Islamophobia: The Rise of Respectable Racism in France by Jim Wolfreys

In Republic of Islamophobia: The Rise of Respectable Racism in France, Jim Wolfreys describes the emergence of a ‘respectable racism’ against Muslims in France since the 1980s, fuelled by the ‘War on Terror’ and rooted in the nation’s colonial history. Praising the book’s candid and incisive writing, Elsa Stéphan welcomes this as a commendably comprehensive and accessible account on Islamophobia in contemporary France. 
Republic of Islamophobia: The […]

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    Book Review: Europe Reset: New Directions for the EU by Richard Youngs

Book Review: Europe Reset: New Directions for the EU by Richard Youngs

In Europe Reset: New Directions for the EU, Richard Youngs looks at the issue of democracy in Europe, identifying a crisis rooted in alienation from the prevailing model of integration and proposing new initiatives for democratic participation by citizens. While the book largely focuses on democracy on the supra-national level, which may overlook the need for improvement both nationally and sub-nationally, this […]

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    Book Review: The Nordic Models in Political Science: Challenged, but Still Viable? edited by Oddbjørn Knutsen

Book Review: The Nordic Models in Political Science: Challenged, but Still Viable? edited by Oddbjørn Knutsen

In The Nordic Models in Political Science: Challenged, but Still Viable?, editor Oddbjørn Knutsen and contributors provide a useful update on the current state of the ‘Nordic models’. This book is a timely reminder that alternative models of governance exist and will nourish debates about the UK’s future following the Brexit vote to leave the European Union. ‘Where do we go from here?’ […]

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April 29th, 2018|featured|0 Comments|

Book Review: The New Poverty by Stephen Armstrong

Coinciding with the 75th anniversary of the Beveridge Report and written in the spirit of George Orwell’s The Road to Wigan Pier, The New Poverty takes a tour of contemporary Britain to show how the implementation of austerity has worked to impoverish millions and leave millions more close to crisis. The combination of reportage and statistics presented by author Stephen Armstrong offers compelling, evocative and […]

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    Book Review: Among Wolves: Ethnography and the Immersive Study of Power by Timothy Pachirat

Book Review: Among Wolves: Ethnography and the Immersive Study of Power by Timothy Pachirat

In Among Wolves: Ethnography and the Immersive Study of Power, Timothy Pachirat offers an experimental contribution to scholarship on social science methodology. Written in the form of a play, the book unfolds over seven acts which reflect on different aspects of ethnographic research, including the role of the researcher, the issue of power and questions of accountability. This is a rich, accessible […]

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    Book Review: The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms by R. Alexander Bentley and Michael J. O’Brien

Book Review: The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms by R. Alexander Bentley and Michael J. O’Brien

In The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms, R. Alexander Bentley and Michael J. O’Brien examine the fast pace of technological and cultural change today, contrasting our modes of knowledge exchange with those of early humans. Exploring rapidly changing traditions from ancient fairy tales to viral memes, this playful book gives great insight into the ways in which cultures are transformed and sustained over […]

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    Book Review: Miseducation: Inequality, Education and the Working Classes by Diane Reay

Book Review: Miseducation: Inequality, Education and the Working Classes by Diane Reay

In Miseducation: Inequality, Education and the Working Classes, Diane Reay draws on interviews with over 500 children to explore the class inequalities that persist in UK education from the transition to secondary school up to university. The book’s personalisation of everyday working-class experiences of education, combined with statistical evidence on continued inequality, makes this engaging and timely reading, finds Natasha Codiroli Mcmaster.
Miseducation: Inequality, Education […]

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    Book review: Minority Women and Austerity: Survival and Resistance in France and Britain by Leah Bassel and Akwugo Emejulu

Book review: Minority Women and Austerity: Survival and Resistance in France and Britain by Leah Bassel and Akwugo Emejulu

In Minority Women and Austerity: Survival and Resistance in France and Britain, Leah Bassel and Akwugo Emejulu contribute to analyses of the political effects of austerity by looking at how minority women in cities across the UK and France navigate their race, gender, professional lives and social groups in an increasingly harsh economic landscape. Drawing on interviews, focus groups and knowledge exchange events, this […]

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    Book Review: A Brief History of Feminism by Antje Schrupp, illustrated by Patu

Book Review: A Brief History of Feminism by Antje Schrupp, illustrated by Patu

With A Brief History of Feminism, Antje Schrupp and illustrator Patu have crafted a graphic novel that traces the development of feminism from antiquity to the present day. While the book is primarily limited to offering an account of the evolution of European, Western feminist movements, this is nonetheless a fun, accessible and educational read that will give readers a thirst to learn more, finds Sonia […]

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    Book Review: Youth Movements and Elections in Eastern Europe by Olena Nikolayenko

Book Review: Youth Movements and Elections in Eastern Europe by Olena Nikolayenko

In Youth Movements and Elections in Eastern Europe, Olena Nikolayenko examines the role played by youth activists in mobilising citizens prior to elections against incumbent regimes in post-communist Europe, focusing on Serbia, Belarus, Georgia, Ukraine and Azerbaijan in the early 2000s. Drawing on interviews, government sources, NGOs and media reports, this book offers important insights into the impact of youth movements upon democratisation […]

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    Book Review: The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution by Yuri Slezkine

Book Review: The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution by Yuri Slezkine

In The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution, Yuri Slezkine offers an account of the Russian Revolution by focusing on the history of ‘The House of Government’, a Moscow apartment building built to house the revolutionary elite. While unconvinced by the book’s conclusion and some of its more meandering detours, this remains a vast, theoretically bold and innovative piece of […]

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March 4th, 2018|Book Reviews|0 Comments|
  • Permalink The Exchange Square 交易廣場 is a building complex located in Central, Hong Kong. 

The property is the home of the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong since the 1980s. It also houses many international banking and law firms ncluding Credit Suisse, Bank of Montreal, Lloyd George Management, Latham & Watkins, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, Allen & Overy and Allens Arthur Robinson. It is also home to the consulates in Hong Kong of Argentina, Canada, Japan, and the American Club of Hong Kong.
 
Pictured is One Exchange Square and Two Exchange Square from the point of view from the entrance level—which, like many hotels in Hong kong, is not on the ground floor but at the elevated footbridge level.

This photo was taken at night so it is a bit grainy. And as usual, I find this extreme wide angle view up to be more interesting than other perspectives.

# SML Data
+ Date: 2013-02-09 22:29:08 GMT+0800
+ Dimensions: 4979 x 3319
+ Exposure: 1/13 sec at f/4.0
+ Focal Length: 17 mm
+ ISO: 3200
+ Flash: Did not fire
+ Camera: Canon EOS 7D
+ Lens: Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM
+ GPS: 22°17'0Gallery

    Book Review: A Research Agenda for Neoliberalism by Kean Birch

Book Review: A Research Agenda for Neoliberalism by Kean Birch

In A Research Agenda for Neoliberalism, Kean Birch seeks to bring clarity to the ubiquitous use of ‘neoliberalism’ as a term in academic and popular discourse, looking at how analysts from across the political spectrum have understood this concept. The book does a valuable job of establishing the contours of existing discussions of neoliberalism, finds Christopher May, and would be an excellent resource for […]

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February 25th, 2018|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: The Neopopular Bubble: Speculating on ‘the People’ in Late Modern Democracy by Péter Csigó

Book Review: The Neopopular Bubble: Speculating on ‘the People’ in Late Modern Democracy by Péter Csigó

In The Neopopular Bubble: Speculating on ‘the People’ in Late Modern Democracy, Péter Csigó argues that the financial crisis of 2008 has exposed novel forms of sense-making that have come to dominate public discourse: mechanisms that are collective, speculative and mythological in nature, resulting in autonomous discursive ‘bubbles’ that are largely immune to falsification. The book provides a foundation for a new […]

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February 11th, 2018|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: The Borders of ‘Europe’: Autonomy of Migration, Tactics of Bordering edited by Nicholas De Genova

Book Review: The Borders of ‘Europe’: Autonomy of Migration, Tactics of Bordering edited by Nicholas De Genova

The collection The Borders of ‘Europe’: Autonomy of Migration, Tactics of Bordering, edited by Nicholas De Genova, offers a compelling in-depth analysis of immigration to Europe through contributions that repeatedly go to the heart of contemporary policy conundrums. Suggesting ways in which scholar-activists can make a potential difference, this book offers a thorough education in the implications of Europe’s evolving, unwieldy border […]

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February 4th, 2018|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Routledge Handbook of International Political Sociology edited by Xavier Guillaume and Pinar Bilgin

Book Review: Routledge Handbook of International Political Sociology edited by Xavier Guillaume and Pinar Bilgin

In the Routledge Handbook of International Political Sociology, editors Xavier Guillaume and Pinar Bilgin bring together contributors to explore methodologies, theories and sites of analysis emerging out of and extending beyond the meeting point of international, political and sociological study. Hesham Shafick explores how the volume reveals both the opportunities and risks for IPS scholarship today. 
Routledge Handbook of International Political Sociology. Xavier Guillaume and Pinar Bilgin (eds). […]

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    Book Review: The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World by Maya Jasanoff

Book Review: The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World by Maya Jasanoff

In The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World, Maya Jasanoff argues that novelist Joseph Conrad’s life and works evidence a global world in the making at the end of the nineteenth century. Padraic X. Scanlan praises this as an impressive experiment in the genre, but asks: without fully contending with the racist imaginary that shaped much of his work, can we so seamlessly embrace Conrad as […]

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