book review

Book Review: The New Poverty by Stephen Armstrong

Coinciding with the 75th anniversary of the Beveridge Report and written in the spirit of George Orwell’s The Road to Wigan Pier, The New Poverty takes a tour of contemporary Britain to show how the implementation of austerity has worked to impoverish millions and leave millions more close to crisis. The combination of reportage and statistics presented by author Stephen Armstrong offers compelling, evocative and […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Among Wolves: Ethnography and the Immersive Study of Power by Timothy Pachirat

Book Review: Among Wolves: Ethnography and the Immersive Study of Power by Timothy Pachirat

In Among Wolves: Ethnography and the Immersive Study of Power, Timothy Pachirat offers an experimental contribution to scholarship on social science methodology. Written in the form of a play, the book unfolds over seven acts which reflect on different aspects of ethnographic research, including the role of the researcher, the issue of power and questions of accountability. This is a rich, accessible […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms by R. Alexander Bentley and Michael J. O’Brien

Book Review: The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms by R. Alexander Bentley and Michael J. O’Brien

In The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms, R. Alexander Bentley and Michael J. O’Brien examine the fast pace of technological and cultural change today, contrasting our modes of knowledge exchange with those of early humans. Exploring rapidly changing traditions from ancient fairy tales to viral memes, this playful book gives great insight into the ways in which cultures are transformed and sustained over […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Miseducation: Inequality, Education and the Working Classes by Diane Reay

Book Review: Miseducation: Inequality, Education and the Working Classes by Diane Reay

In Miseducation: Inequality, Education and the Working Classes, Diane Reay draws on interviews with over 500 children to explore the class inequalities that persist in UK education from the transition to secondary school up to university. The book’s personalisation of everyday working-class experiences of education, combined with statistical evidence on continued inequality, makes this engaging and timely reading, finds Natasha Codiroli Mcmaster.
Miseducation: Inequality, Education […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book review: Minority Women and Austerity: Survival and Resistance in France and Britain by Leah Bassel and Akwugo Emejulu

Book review: Minority Women and Austerity: Survival and Resistance in France and Britain by Leah Bassel and Akwugo Emejulu

In Minority Women and Austerity: Survival and Resistance in France and Britain, Leah Bassel and Akwugo Emejulu contribute to analyses of the political effects of austerity by looking at how minority women in cities across the UK and France navigate their race, gender, professional lives and social groups in an increasingly harsh economic landscape. Drawing on interviews, focus groups and knowledge exchange events, this […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: A Brief History of Feminism by Antje Schrupp, illustrated by Patu

Book Review: A Brief History of Feminism by Antje Schrupp, illustrated by Patu

With A Brief History of Feminism, Antje Schrupp and illustrator Patu have crafted a graphic novel that traces the development of feminism from antiquity to the present day. While the book is primarily limited to offering an account of the evolution of European, Western feminist movements, this is nonetheless a fun, accessible and educational read that will give readers a thirst to learn more, finds Sonia […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Youth Movements and Elections in Eastern Europe by Olena Nikolayenko

Book Review: Youth Movements and Elections in Eastern Europe by Olena Nikolayenko

In Youth Movements and Elections in Eastern Europe, Olena Nikolayenko examines the role played by youth activists in mobilising citizens prior to elections against incumbent regimes in post-communist Europe, focusing on Serbia, Belarus, Georgia, Ukraine and Azerbaijan in the early 2000s. Drawing on interviews, government sources, NGOs and media reports, this book offers important insights into the impact of youth movements upon democratisation […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution by Yuri Slezkine

Book Review: The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution by Yuri Slezkine

In The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution, Yuri Slezkine offers an account of the Russian Revolution by focusing on the history of ‘The House of Government’, a Moscow apartment building built to house the revolutionary elite. While unconvinced by the book’s conclusion and some of its more meandering detours, this remains a vast, theoretically bold and innovative piece of […]

Share
March 4th, 2018|Book Reviews|0 Comments|
  • Permalink The Exchange Square 交易廣場 is a building complex located in Central, Hong Kong. 

The property is the home of the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong since the 1980s. It also houses many international banking and law firms ncluding Credit Suisse, Bank of Montreal, Lloyd George Management, Latham & Watkins, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, Allen & Overy and Allens Arthur Robinson. It is also home to the consulates in Hong Kong of Argentina, Canada, Japan, and the American Club of Hong Kong.
 
Pictured is One Exchange Square and Two Exchange Square from the point of view from the entrance level—which, like many hotels in Hong kong, is not on the ground floor but at the elevated footbridge level.

This photo was taken at night so it is a bit grainy. And as usual, I find this extreme wide angle view up to be more interesting than other perspectives.

# SML Data
+ Date: 2013-02-09 22:29:08 GMT+0800
+ Dimensions: 4979 x 3319
+ Exposure: 1/13 sec at f/4.0
+ Focal Length: 17 mm
+ ISO: 3200
+ Flash: Did not fire
+ Camera: Canon EOS 7D
+ Lens: Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM
+ GPS: 22°17'0Gallery

    Book Review: A Research Agenda for Neoliberalism by Kean Birch

Book Review: A Research Agenda for Neoliberalism by Kean Birch

In A Research Agenda for Neoliberalism, Kean Birch seeks to bring clarity to the ubiquitous use of ‘neoliberalism’ as a term in academic and popular discourse, looking at how analysts from across the political spectrum have understood this concept. The book does a valuable job of establishing the contours of existing discussions of neoliberalism, finds Christopher May, and would be an excellent resource for […]

Share
February 25th, 2018|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Neopopular Bubble: Speculating on ‘the People’ in Late Modern Democracy by Péter Csigó

Book Review: The Neopopular Bubble: Speculating on ‘the People’ in Late Modern Democracy by Péter Csigó

In The Neopopular Bubble: Speculating on ‘the People’ in Late Modern Democracy, Péter Csigó argues that the financial crisis of 2008 has exposed novel forms of sense-making that have come to dominate public discourse: mechanisms that are collective, speculative and mythological in nature, resulting in autonomous discursive ‘bubbles’ that are largely immune to falsification. The book provides a foundation for a new […]

Share
February 11th, 2018|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Borders of ‘Europe’: Autonomy of Migration, Tactics of Bordering edited by Nicholas De Genova

Book Review: The Borders of ‘Europe’: Autonomy of Migration, Tactics of Bordering edited by Nicholas De Genova

The collection The Borders of ‘Europe’: Autonomy of Migration, Tactics of Bordering, edited by Nicholas De Genova, offers a compelling in-depth analysis of immigration to Europe through contributions that repeatedly go to the heart of contemporary policy conundrums. Suggesting ways in which scholar-activists can make a potential difference, this book offers a thorough education in the implications of Europe’s evolving, unwieldy border […]

Share
February 4th, 2018|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Routledge Handbook of International Political Sociology edited by Xavier Guillaume and Pinar Bilgin

Book Review: Routledge Handbook of International Political Sociology edited by Xavier Guillaume and Pinar Bilgin

In the Routledge Handbook of International Political Sociology, editors Xavier Guillaume and Pinar Bilgin bring together contributors to explore methodologies, theories and sites of analysis emerging out of and extending beyond the meeting point of international, political and sociological study. Hesham Shafick explores how the volume reveals both the opportunities and risks for IPS scholarship today. 
Routledge Handbook of International Political Sociology. Xavier Guillaume and Pinar Bilgin (eds). […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World by Maya Jasanoff

Book Review: The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World by Maya Jasanoff

In The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World, Maya Jasanoff argues that novelist Joseph Conrad’s life and works evidence a global world in the making at the end of the nineteenth century. Padraic X. Scanlan praises this as an impressive experiment in the genre, but asks: without fully contending with the racist imaginary that shaped much of his work, can we so seamlessly embrace Conrad as […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Building Better Societies: Promoting Social Justice in a World Falling Apart edited by Rowland Atkinson, Lisa Mckenzie and Simon Winlow

Book Review: Building Better Societies: Promoting Social Justice in a World Falling Apart edited by Rowland Atkinson, Lisa Mckenzie and Simon Winlow

In Building Better Societies: Promoting Social Justice in a World Falling Apart, editors Rowland Atkinson, Lisa Mckenzie and Simon Winlow make a moral case for the social sciences to challenge a prevailing neoliberal climate based around profit-making and individualism. The book’s central message — that the notion of the social needs to be reclaimed and restored for a better society — makes this a relevant and timely addition to […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Transnational Homosexuals in Communist Poland: Cross-Border Flows in Gay and Lesbian Magazines by Lukasz Szulc

Book Review: Transnational Homosexuals in Communist Poland: Cross-Border Flows in Gay and Lesbian Magazines by Lukasz Szulc

In Transnational Homosexuals in Communist Poland: Cross-Border Flows in Gay and Lesbian Magazines, Lukasz Szulc examines the emergence of Polish gay and lesbian magazines in the 1980s, challenging the perception of LGBT activism as a post-1989 discourse in Central and Eastern Europe. Drawing upon a diverse and rich array of resources, this is a fascinating and convincing study that suggests valuable avenues for […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: English Uprising: Brexit and the Mainstreaming of the Far Right by Paul Stocker

Book Review: English Uprising: Brexit and the Mainstreaming of the Far Right by Paul Stocker

In England Uprising: Brexit and the Mainstreaming of the Far Right, Paul Stocker offers a historical account of the rise of far-right movements in the UK from the early twentieth century to the present, showing how the gradual mainstreaming of far-right discourse impacted upon the recent UK Brexit vote. This book is an excellent primer for those looking to understand the changing influence of […]

Share
December 31st, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Humiliation in International Relations: A Pathology of Contemporary International Systems by Bertrand Badie

Book Review: Humiliation in International Relations: A Pathology of Contemporary International Systems by Bertrand Badie

In Humilitation in International Relations: A Pathology of Contemporary International Systems, Bertrand Badie addresses the longstanding use of humiliation as a systemic practice wielded by dominant powers within the international state system. While Badie’s optimism regarding the capacity of greater social integration to quell the consequences of humiliation may not convince all readers, this important book and its fascinating historical examples are more relevant […]

Share
December 24th, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Grassroots Activism and the Evolution of Transitional Justice: The Families of the Disappeared by Iosif Kovras

Book Review: Grassroots Activism and the Evolution of Transitional Justice: The Families of the Disappeared by Iosif Kovras

In Grassroots Activism and the Evolution of Transitional Justice: The Families of the Disappeared, Iosif Kovras looks at the varying mobilisations of the families of the disappeared through four case studies – Chile, Cyprus, Lebanon and South Africa. Emphasising the importance of context in shaping the objectives and success of the different movements, this is a thought-provoking contribution to the critical literature on […]

Share
December 17th, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Ethnic Mobilization, Violence and the Politics of Affect: The Serb Democratic Party and the Bosnian War by Adis Maksić

Book Review: Ethnic Mobilization, Violence and the Politics of Affect: The Serb Democratic Party and the Bosnian War by Adis Maksić

In Ethnic Mobilization, Violence and the Politics of Affect: The Serb Democratic Party and the Bosnian War, Adis Maksić offers a comprehensive and insightful account of the processes through which Bosnian Serbs became ethnically mobilised around the Serb Democratic Party. Sarah Correia finds this to be an essential book for anyone studying the Bosnian war, the dynamics of ethnic conflict and nation formation.
Ethnic […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Diploma Democracy: The Rise of Political Meritocracy by Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille

Book Review: Diploma Democracy: The Rise of Political Meritocracy by Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille

In Diploma Democracy: The Rise of Political Meritocracy, Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille examine how Western democracies are shaped by educational inequalities that lead to gaps in political participation and governments being dominated by academic elites. While less sure of some of the authors’ solutions for these ‘diploma democracies’, Jameel Hampton finds the book to be a convincing account of the influence of education on political […]

Share
December 3rd, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|