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    Book Review: Analysing Corruption: An Introduction by Dan Hough

Book Review: Analysing Corruption: An Introduction by Dan Hough

In Analysing Corruption: An Introduction, Dan Hough offers a new textbook that underscores the difficulties of defining, measuring and analysing corruption. While arguing that some of the challenges facing corruption research and policy may be overstated in the book, this is a good wide-ranging introduction to some of the main ideas and evidence driving the study of corruption today, finds Paul Caruana-Galizia. 
Analysing Corruption: […]

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    Book Review: Seawomen of Iceland: Survival on the Edge by Margaret Willson

Book Review: Seawomen of Iceland: Survival on the Edge by Margaret Willson

In Seawomen of Iceland: Survival on the Edge, Margaret Willson offers a new ethnographic study that traces a largely forgotten history of Icelandic seawomen, eloquently weaving together the past and the present. This book shows how deep curiosity and the posing of seemingly small questions can lead to large-scale insights, and should be read by all those interested in ethnography, recommends Younes Saramifar. 
Seawomen […]

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    Book Review: A Little History of Economics by Niall Kishtainy

Book Review: A Little History of Economics by Niall Kishtainy

In A Little History of Economics, Niall Kishtainy details the complex trajectory of economics from ancient Greece to the present, drawing on a wealth of historical knowledge, illuminating anecdotes and examples as well as imaginative metaphors to trace the evolution of economic thinking. But, asks Madeline McSherry, where are the women in this history? 
A Little History of Economics. Niall Kishtainy. Yale University Press. […]

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September 24th, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Blood and Faith: The Purging of Muslim Spain, 1492-1614 by Matthew Carr

Book Review: Blood and Faith: The Purging of Muslim Spain, 1492-1614 by Matthew Carr

In Blood and Faith: The Purging of Muslim Spain, 1492-1614, Matthew Carr explores how, following the 1492 conquest of Granada, the sixteenth-century Spanish monarchy conducted peninsula-wide expulsions and conversions of Muslims as well as Jews. Ed Jones finds in the book’s historical analysis a valuable cautionary tale for contemporary public conversations surrounding immigration and integration regarding the consequences of legitimating fear and violence. 
Blood and Faith: […]

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    Book Review: A Sharing Economy: How Social Wealth Funds can Reduce Inequality and Help Balance the Books by Stewart Lansley

Book Review: A Sharing Economy: How Social Wealth Funds can Reduce Inequality and Help Balance the Books by Stewart Lansley

In A Sharing Economy: How Social Wealth Funds can Reduce Inequality and Help Balance the Books, Stewart Lansley offers a timely proposal for a significant shift in the relations between capital, citizens and the state to combat inequality and ensure a more just distribution of wealth. This is a concise and informative book that will be of interest to anyone interested in […]

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    Book Review: Trading Barriers: Immigration and the Remaking of Globalization by Margaret E. Peters

Book Review: Trading Barriers: Immigration and the Remaking of Globalization by Margaret E. Peters

In Trading Barriers: Immigration and the Remaking of Globalization, Margaret E. Peters explores how an increase in free trade has led to more restrictive immigration policies around the world. While questioning some elements of its structure and style, Paul Caruana-Galizia nonetheless welcomes this as a timely and well-researched study that offers valuable insight into the trade-offs between free trade and immigration. 
Trading Barriers: Immigration and the […]

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    Book Review: Gentrifier by John Joe Schlichtman, Jason Patch and Marc Lamont Hill

Book Review: Gentrifier by John Joe Schlichtman, Jason Patch and Marc Lamont Hill

In Gentrifier, John Joe Schlichtman, Jason Patch and Marc Lamont Hill offer a riposte to the widespread use of the term ‘gentrification’ in recent years, drawing on their own personal experiences as self-identified ‘gentrifiers’ to suggest a different understanding of urban change. While recognising that the book’s approach may prove controversial, Peter Matthews recommends this accessible read as a welcome corrective to media and popular narratives of […]

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    Book Review: Accelerating Academia: The Changing Structure of Academic Time by Filip Vostal

Book Review: Accelerating Academia: The Changing Structure of Academic Time by Filip Vostal

In Accelerating Academia: The Changing Structure of Academic Time, Filip Vostal examines how speed has become a key pressure within Higher Education through interviews with twenty academics based in the UK. While the empirical research could be broader, Luke Martell highly recommends the book for offering considered, inquiring reflections on the structures that are contributing to the acceleration of academic life. 
Accelerating Academia: The Changing Structure of […]

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    Book Review: The Divide: A Brief Guide to Global Inequality and its Solutions by Jason Hickel

Book Review: The Divide: A Brief Guide to Global Inequality and its Solutions by Jason Hickel

In The Divide: A Brief Guide to Global Inequality and its Solutions, Jason Hickel challenges the progress narrative that has shaped perceptions of global poverty, arguing that there is a widening gulf that is a direct product of the political order. This is a well-written and highly readable diagnosis of the current causes and state of global inequality, writes John Picton, and an […]

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    Book Review: Protest in Putin’s Russia by Mischa Gabowitsch

Book Review: Protest in Putin’s Russia by Mischa Gabowitsch

In Protest in Putin’s Russia, Mischa Gabowitsch challenges the portrayal of the 2011 Russian protests as an inconsequential, largely middle-class rebellion, by drawing on interviews and other data to situate the wave of mobilisation within the broader Russian political landscape. Jeff Roquen praises this as an accomplished text that will be of interest to specialists and general readers in offering […]

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April 2nd, 2017|Jeff Roquen|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Gramsci’s Common Sense: Inequality and its Narratives by Kate Crehan

Book Review: Gramsci’s Common Sense: Inequality and its Narratives by Kate Crehan

In Gramsci’s Common Sense: Inequality and its Narratives, Kate Crehan examines a number of core concepts in the work of theorist Antonio Gramsci – including common sense, the subaltern and the intellectual – that can help give precise insight into the emergence and persistence of social inequalities. Drawing on such case studies as the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street movements, […]

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January 22nd, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Memories of the Spanish Civil War: Conflict and Community in Rural Spain by Ruth Sanz Sabido

Book Review: Memories of the Spanish Civil War: Conflict and Community in Rural Spain by Ruth Sanz Sabido

In Memories of the Spanish Civil War: Conflict and Community in Rural Spain, Ruth Sanz Sabido recovers the testimonies of survivors of the Spanish Civil War and the early years of General Franco’s dictatorship from one village in Huelva province in Andalusia. This is a compelling and powerful ethnographic study that gives voice to hitherto silenced experiences of Spanish fascism, writes […]

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January 15th, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Economic Governance in Europe: Comparative Paradoxes and Constitutional Challenges by Federico Fabbrini

Book Review: Economic Governance in Europe: Comparative Paradoxes and Constitutional Challenges by Federico Fabbrini

In this book, Federico Fabbrini outlines the impact of the Euro crisis on the constitutional and legal architecture of the European Union, arguing for a shift from constitutional arrangements rooted in ‘accident and force’ to systems ‘designed on the basis of reflection and choice’. Francesco Costamagna welcomes this as a refreshing challenge to the assumption that movement towards an EU super-state […]

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December 18th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Energy, Capitalism and World Order: Toward a New Agenda in International Political Economy edited by Tim Di Muzio and Jesse Salah Ovadia

Book Review: Energy, Capitalism and World Order: Toward a New Agenda in International Political Economy edited by Tim Di Muzio and Jesse Salah Ovadia

In this new collection, editors Tim Di Muzio and Jesse Salah Ovadia bring together contributors to examine the relationship between energy, capitalism and the world order in light of pressing and emergent issues such as fracking, biofuels and climate change. While more attention on the diverse challenges faced by different political economies would have been welcome, the collection presents lucid analyses […]

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December 11th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: What is Political Sociology? by Elisabeth S. Clemens

Book Review: What is Political Sociology? by Elisabeth S. Clemens

In this book, Elisabeth S. Clemens aims to produce a ‘definitive and inspirational standard text for students at all levels’. Patricia Hogwood writes that her work offers a concise overview of political sociology as the human face of politics: the politicised interactions that take place within and between the domains of family, work, civic culture and structures of government. Clemens presents key […]

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December 4th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: How Europeans View and Evaluate Democracy edited by Mónica Ferrín and Hanspeter Kriesi

Book Review: How Europeans View and Evaluate Democracy edited by Mónica Ferrín and Hanspeter Kriesi

In How Europeans View and Evaluate Democracy, editors Mónica Ferrín and Hanspeter Kriesi offer insight into perceptions of democracy across Europe by examining how Europeans evaluate their experience of democracy and assess the legitimacy of current democratic regimes across the continent. This comprehensive study will be an excellent read for political comparativists and Europeanists, finds Simeon Mitropolitski.
How Europeans View and Evaluate Democracy. Mónica Ferrín and […]

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    Book Review: After the Crisis: Anthropological Thought, Neoliberalism and the Aftermath edited by James G. Carrier

Book Review: After the Crisis: Anthropological Thought, Neoliberalism and the Aftermath edited by James G. Carrier

In After the Crisis: Anthropological Thought, Neoliberalism and the Aftermath, editor James G. Carrier and contributors reflect on the impact that neoliberalism has had on the state of anthropology today. While Christopher May finds a clear account of the sense of crisis currently gripping the discipline, he argues that greater engagement with the field of critical political economy might have helped […]

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September 4th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: The Oxford Handbook of Swedish Politics edited by Jon Pierre

Book Review: The Oxford Handbook of Swedish Politics edited by Jon Pierre

In this new edited volume, The Oxford Handbook of Swedish Politics, Jon Pierre brings together 50 contributors to describe and analyse Sweden’s past and contemporary political and constitutional settlement. Challenging romanticising interpretations of Sweden as an inherent beacon of prosperity and equality, this is a much-needed, well-organised and comprehensive collection that traces the evolution, development and possible twilight of […]

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    Book Review: Foreign Policy Breakthroughs: Cases in Successful Diplomacy edited by Robert Hutchings and Jeremi Suri

Book Review: Foreign Policy Breakthroughs: Cases in Successful Diplomacy edited by Robert Hutchings and Jeremi Suri

In Foreign Policy Breakthroughs: Cases in Successful Diplomacy, editors Robert Hutchings and Jeremi Suri focus on a number of diplomatic successes since 1945, arguing that diplomacy not only functions as an adjunct to force, but also as a means of building international networks of cooperation dependent upon necessary compromise and sustainable agreements. This book offers important insights into the intricate […]

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January 17th, 2016|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|

Book Review: Citizenship by Étienne Balibar

Citizenship presents a collection of seven lectures by Étienne Balibar, extending his longstanding engagement with citizenship as a concept that is both inextricably linked to, and in contradiction with, democracy. While the text may occasionally lose sight of its central topic of citizenship, Chris Moreh highlights its ‘affirmative’ agenda in the face of contemporary challenges to democratic politics.

Citizenship. […]

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