May 29 2018

The #MeToo Movement and the Greek Silence

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By Katerina Glyniadaki

Earlier this month, the verdict of the ‘wolf pack’ case sparked the #MeToo movement to spread across Spain. Both in the streets and on social media platforms, the court decision was met with uproar. According to the supporters of the campaign, the judges were biased, and their decision was overly lenient towards the perpetrators and rather unfair to the victim. This event brought forward the institutionalisation of patriarchal attitudes in the justice system and the systematic discrimination against victims of gender-based violence (GBV). Even if several months later, the movement which started in Hollywood last October, reached Spain, too. Continue reading

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Apr 23 2018

How to boost Greek exports

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By Peter Sanfey

The past year has seen some welcome, and long overdue, good news from Greece. After nearly a decade of deep recession, the economy started growing again in 2017, unemployment is falling and business and consumer confidence are rising. But sceptics would say that some bounce-back was inevitable after such a calamitous drop in economic activity. The question is whether this recovery is sustainable. The answer will depend largely on the extent to which Greek corporates can restructure their operations to take advantage of new opportunities in an evolving global economy. In other words, a sustainable recovery will need to be export-led. Continue reading

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Apr 17 2018

Greece’s clean exit: Politics vs economics

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By Lorenzo Codogno

There seems to be a strong convergence of interests between the Greek government, the European Commission and Eurozone Member States (and the IMF): they all want a clean exit from the Third Economic Adjustment Programme for Greece. Lorenzo Codogno explains that political motivations may well collide with the need to reduce risks and favour a smooth and successful return to normality with a post-programme in place. Continue reading

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Feb 26 2018

Uncovering the profound effects that pension and health care reforms have had in post-crisis Greece

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By Marina Angelaki

Pension and health care reforms introduced in Greece following the 2009 crisis, and the bail out agreements signed with the Troika of the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund, have attracted attention because of the significant cuts they entailed. Drawing on recent research, Marina Angelaki writes that focusing exclusively on retrenchment gives only part of the picture as it masks other transformative processes with long-term effects that have taken place in both systems over this period. Continue reading

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Feb 19 2018

Turning Greece into an Education Hub

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By Jessie Voumvaki

In the midst of a prolonged crisis, Greece urgently needs new growth drivers for its economy. Moreover, recent international research has identified that the negative impact of globalization on income distribution in advanced economies can be offset through increases in total factor productivity (TFP), which in turn requires, inter alia, investment in education. Leveraging on the booming global trend of students’ mobility and capitalizing on the academic excellence of Greek diaspora, Greece could become a regional education hub. Supported by a powerful reputation (dating back to ancient Greece) for producing educators, Greece could attract from abroad academic professors and university students – boosting its exports of services as well as its medium-term potential growth (through its transformation to a knowledge-intensive economy). Continue reading

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Feb 14 2018

Mobility of Highly-Skilled Individuals, Local Innovation and Entrepreneurship Activity

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In an open economy migration is a natural process. It certainly poses challenges for the host countries but also brings benefits, especially if skillful human capital is accumulated. High-skilled migrants bring advanced or “upper-tail” human capital (Mokyr, 2002; Squicciarini and Voigtlaender, 2015) to the host country, spur technological progress through the creation and diffusion of knowledge and innovation (Lucas, 2009; Kerr and Lincoln, 2010; Gennaioli et al., 2013). In contrast, the loss of highly skilled workers deprives their home countries of the scientists, entrepreneurs and other professionals who drive their economies to higher levels of efficiency and productivity.

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Feb 1 2018

The Effects of Economic Crisis on Greek Entrepreneurship

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By Jessie Voumvaki

Greek SMEs – which generate ¼ of Greek GDP and cover 45 per cent of the country’s employment – have been hit hard during the past decade by a perfect storm (i.e. sharp decrease of domestic demand, high political uncertainty, tight credit conditions and imposition of capital controls).

With the segment’s production having been reduced by more than 30 per cent during the crisis years, the surviving Greek SMEs are currently facing the great challenge of operational transformation to higher competitive standards. Continue reading

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Jan 15 2018

The Linkage Between Nation Branding And Nation Competitiveness

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By George J. Avlonitis

Within the contemporary international competitive environment, nations are constantly required to respond to a dynamic social and economic framework, similar to a commercial marketplace . Concurrently, nations compete with each other for resources and alliances that could establish and enhance their competitive advantage. Nation branding is considered a major tool for the creation and leverage of competitive advantages of nations and consequently for their sustainable development. Continue reading

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Nov 6 2017

The Political Economy of Privatisation in Greece after the Economic Crisis

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By Özgün Sarımehmet Duman

The recent economic crisis has been a very solid testimony to the interconnectedness of world markets that the US-originated crisis has had an endemic and epidemic reflection throughout the world, the Eurozone having prime eminence due to its own monetary and single market based specificities. Among other peripheral economies of the Eurozone, the emergence of the economic crisis in Greece has disclosed its structural specificities that the long been delayed reforms for improving not only the functioning of the real economy and the financial market but also their integration with the capitalist world have been put at the top of the agenda[1]. Accordingly, the introduction of non-structural and structural measures dominated the economic recovery process of the post-crisis Greece, despite some discrepancies in implementation. These measures mainly targeted to improve the functioning of the real economy in terms of increasing competitiveness and to enhance the openness of the financial market to the international market. Continue reading

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Oct 30 2017

Sexualities & Ageing: The Case of Cyprus

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By Constantinos N. Phellas

The World Health Organization once asked (2002): “As people are living longer, how can the quality of life in old age be improved? How do we help people remain active and independent as they age? How do we strengthen health promotion and prevention policies especially those directed to older people?” (“Active Ageing”, pp.5, WHO)*

If by 2025 one third of Europe will be aged 60 and over, and by 2050 half the population of Europe will be 50 or older, it is vital to construct questions such as those imposed by the World Health Organization as the aging population is one of the main contributors in shaping today and tomorrows economic and social developments of Europe. It is inevitably true that the demographic state of Europe is changing and can be characterized by the shrinking number of young people; an increase in life expectancy and a dramatic drop in infant mortality. The consequences of such a demographic transition will have a tremendous impact on the economy, care, social development; welfare and well-being in European societies (Agent et al. 2006). To prevent such costly impacts on the population as a whole special attention needs to be placed on promoting health and good quality of life in older age. Investing in both are important determinants of economic growth, competitiveness, labor supply and the decreasing likelihood of early retirement. Continue reading

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