Aug 21 2018

Leadership is about character, courage and empathy: Alexis Tsipras has failed on all fronts during the Greek fires

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At least 91 people have been killed in wildfires in Greece, with the Greek government, led by Alexis Tsipras, facing criticism over its handling of the disaster. George Kassimeris argues that the response from Tsipras constituted a failure of political leadership, and it is difficult to see how he will be able to re-establish his reputation and the reputation of his party in the eyes of the country.

Cometh the hour, cometh the hollow man or in Greece’s case, the hollow prime minister: Alexis Tsipras. Greece, over the past week, has gone through its gravest and most traumatic crisis since the second world war, after devastating wildfires decimated an entire seaside community outside Athens. As the death toll has now risen to 91 with another 25 people still unaccounted for, the horrific images of terror, anguish and destruction will remain imprinted on the national collective memory long after the demolition of all charred remains.

Obviously, a wildfire as ferociously deadly as this one is beyond human blame, and the political miscalculations that have come to light – the negligent planning, the delayed rescue and aid efforts – should not all be laid at the feet of the Greek government. That said, there could be no clearer instance of a situation where serious, effective leadership was desperately required. Defining moments demand from national leaders courage, character, imagination and most critically compassion. The Greek prime minister (the youngest in the country’s history) has failed dismally to show any of these qualities.

Oblivious and possibly ill-informed about the speed and ferocity of the destruction taking placing, Tsipras at first reacted as if he had been so lulled by his summer sojourn that he was not quite ready to acknowledge reality, let alone attempt to master it. It took him more than 48 hours to decide to come out of his prime ministerial cocoon and deliver a few plain human sentences that people could understand before vanishing again. Only when the magnitude of the calamity became unbearable for the people on the ground did he resort on the fifth day –yes, the fifth – of the disaster to accepting ‘full political responsibility’, though without apologising or satisfying calls for the resignation of his civil protection minister and other key officials.

It was an empty, pointless gesture designed primarily for political damage-limitation purposes and which naturally added insult to injury for the people affected and the relatives of the victims. ‘How does he plan to redeem this political responsibility? What does political responsibility mean?’ a distraught 79-year-old man angrily asked a TV reporter, standing in front of his burnt home.

It is literally incredible that a politician like Alexis Tsipras, supposedly so savvy and politically astute could fail to appreciate how insensitive and contemptible this behaviour would appear. But then again, the same type of insensitive contemptible behaviour was displayed by George W Bush during Hurricane Katrina and Theresa May during the Grenfell Tower fires when both leaders not only failed to demonstrate compassion and empathy but even declined to visit the devastated areas right away. For the record, Tsipras’s unacceptably belated visit to the ravaged areas came a week after the event.

Political leadership is about courage, character and example. If such leadership is to mean anything at all, it must stand for principles that are believed in themselves. It is impossible to look at the Greek premier’s slow, detached, uncaring and unapologetic reaction to a grave national crisis and not conclude that sadly for him as a leader and tragically for the country as whole, he failed on every front.

As the county is trying to recover from the trauma of what happened, the question now is: will he be able to re-establish himself and his government in the eyes of the country? This is very unlikely, in my opinion. He has become damaged goods. His inability over the last week to do more than the bare minimum in a time of unparalleled disaster has cost him the respect of the Greek media and through them the faith of the Greek public.

Note: This article was originally published on the EUROPP – European Politics and Policy Blog.  It gives the views of the authors, and not the position of Greece@LSE , of EUROPP or the London School of Economics.

Lorenzo Codogno – LSE, European Institute
Lorenzo Codogno is Visiting Professor in Practice at the LSE’s European Institute and founder and chief economist of his own consulting vehicle, LC Macro Advisors Ltd.

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May 29 2018

The #MeToo Movement and the Greek Silence

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By Katerina Glyniadaki

Earlier this month, the verdict of the ‘wolf pack’ case sparked the #MeToo movement to spread across Spain. Both in the streets and on social media platforms, the court decision was met with uproar. According to the supporters of the campaign, the judges were biased, and their decision was overly lenient towards the perpetrators and rather unfair to the victim. This event brought forward the institutionalisation of patriarchal attitudes in the justice system and the systematic discrimination against victims of gender-based violence (GBV). Even if several months later, the movement which started in Hollywood last October, reached Spain, too. Continue reading

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Apr 23 2018

How to boost Greek exports

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By Peter Sanfey

The past year has seen some welcome, and long overdue, good news from Greece. After nearly a decade of deep recession, the economy started growing again in 2017, unemployment is falling and business and consumer confidence are rising. But sceptics would say that some bounce-back was inevitable after such a calamitous drop in economic activity. The question is whether this recovery is sustainable. The answer will depend largely on the extent to which Greek corporates can restructure their operations to take advantage of new opportunities in an evolving global economy. In other words, a sustainable recovery will need to be export-led. Continue reading

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Apr 17 2018

Greece’s clean exit: Politics vs economics

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By Lorenzo Codogno

There seems to be a strong convergence of interests between the Greek government, the European Commission and Eurozone Member States (and the IMF): they all want a clean exit from the Third Economic Adjustment Programme for Greece. Lorenzo Codogno explains that political motivations may well collide with the need to reduce risks and favour a smooth and successful return to normality with a post-programme in place. Continue reading

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Feb 26 2018

Uncovering the profound effects that pension and health care reforms have had in post-crisis Greece

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By Marina Angelaki

Pension and health care reforms introduced in Greece following the 2009 crisis, and the bail out agreements signed with the Troika of the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund, have attracted attention because of the significant cuts they entailed. Drawing on recent research, Marina Angelaki writes that focusing exclusively on retrenchment gives only part of the picture as it masks other transformative processes with long-term effects that have taken place in both systems over this period. Continue reading

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Feb 19 2018

Turning Greece into an Education Hub

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By Jessie Voumvaki

In the midst of a prolonged crisis, Greece urgently needs new growth drivers for its economy. Moreover, recent international research has identified that the negative impact of globalization on income distribution in advanced economies can be offset through increases in total factor productivity (TFP), which in turn requires, inter alia, investment in education. Leveraging on the booming global trend of students’ mobility and capitalizing on the academic excellence of Greek diaspora, Greece could become a regional education hub. Supported by a powerful reputation (dating back to ancient Greece) for producing educators, Greece could attract from abroad academic professors and university students – boosting its exports of services as well as its medium-term potential growth (through its transformation to a knowledge-intensive economy). Continue reading

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Feb 14 2018

Mobility of Highly-Skilled Individuals, Local Innovation and Entrepreneurship Activity

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In an open economy migration is a natural process. It certainly poses challenges for the host countries but also brings benefits, especially if skillful human capital is accumulated. High-skilled migrants bring advanced or “upper-tail” human capital (Mokyr, 2002; Squicciarini and Voigtlaender, 2015) to the host country, spur technological progress through the creation and diffusion of knowledge and innovation (Lucas, 2009; Kerr and Lincoln, 2010; Gennaioli et al., 2013). In contrast, the loss of highly skilled workers deprives their home countries of the scientists, entrepreneurs and other professionals who drive their economies to higher levels of efficiency and productivity.

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Feb 1 2018

The Effects of Economic Crisis on Greek Entrepreneurship

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By Jessie Voumvaki

Greek SMEs – which generate ¼ of Greek GDP and cover 45 per cent of the country’s employment – have been hit hard during the past decade by a perfect storm (i.e. sharp decrease of domestic demand, high political uncertainty, tight credit conditions and imposition of capital controls).

With the segment’s production having been reduced by more than 30 per cent during the crisis years, the surviving Greek SMEs are currently facing the great challenge of operational transformation to higher competitive standards. Continue reading

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Jan 15 2018

The Linkage Between Nation Branding And Nation Competitiveness

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By George J. Avlonitis

Within the contemporary international competitive environment, nations are constantly required to respond to a dynamic social and economic framework, similar to a commercial marketplace . Concurrently, nations compete with each other for resources and alliances that could establish and enhance their competitive advantage. Nation branding is considered a major tool for the creation and leverage of competitive advantages of nations and consequently for their sustainable development. Continue reading

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Nov 6 2017

The Political Economy of Privatisation in Greece after the Economic Crisis

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By Özgün Sarımehmet Duman

The recent economic crisis has been a very solid testimony to the interconnectedness of world markets that the US-originated crisis has had an endemic and epidemic reflection throughout the world, the Eurozone having prime eminence due to its own monetary and single market based specificities. Among other peripheral economies of the Eurozone, the emergence of the economic crisis in Greece has disclosed its structural specificities that the long been delayed reforms for improving not only the functioning of the real economy and the financial market but also their integration with the capitalist world have been put at the top of the agenda[1]. Accordingly, the introduction of non-structural and structural measures dominated the economic recovery process of the post-crisis Greece, despite some discrepancies in implementation. These measures mainly targeted to improve the functioning of the real economy in terms of increasing competitiveness and to enhance the openness of the financial market to the international market. Continue reading

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