Jun 29 2016

How Brexit will affect the balance of power in the European Parliament

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By Angelos Chryssogelos

Given the UK has one of the largest contingents of MEPs, how will Brexit change the way political parties are aligned in the European Parliament? Angelos Chryssogelos writes that the effects of removing British MEPs from the Parliament will be wide-ranging, with sovereigntist forces potentially strengthened inside the centre-right EPP, the centre-left S&D becoming more oriented toward an anti-austerity platform, and Eurosceptic forces more likely to consolidate around the ENF group led by Marine Le Pen. Continue reading

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Jun 27 2016

No respite: Greece’s relationship with Europe after Brexit

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AngelosChryssogelosCropBy Angelos Chryssogelos

The vote for Brexit in the referendum of 23 June has obvious immediate effects for Greece. Increased uncertainty will hamper Greece’s economic recovery. When the UK formally exits the EU, the consequences for Greek workers and students there as well as for Greek tourism will be negative. But it is important to also assess the place of Greece in a recalibrated EU in the long term, as well as the strategic repercussions of Brexit for Greek foreign policy. Continue reading

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Jun 14 2016

The ECB grants debt relief to all Eurozone nations except Greece

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De_GrauweBy Paul De Grauwe
Greece may be about to get some debt relief, although there is still resistance to the idea. This column argues that the ECB has been providing other Eurozone countries with debt relief since early 2015 through its programme of quantitative easing. The reason given for excluding Greece from the QE programme – the ‘quality’ of its government bonds – can easily be overcome if the political will exists to do so. It is time to start treating a country struggling under the burden of immense debt in the same way as the other Eurozone countries are treated. Continue reading

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Jun 13 2016

What those calling for Brexit could learn from the Greek bailout referendum

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Kevin Oct 2013 croppedBy Kevin Featherstone

In the summer of 2015, Greece held a referendum on a proposed bailout deal, with the electorate decisively rejecting the proposal. Kevin Featherstone writes that much like the upcoming referendum on the UK’s membership of the EU, the referendum in Greece was accompanied by the rise of populist campaigning in which emotional appeals had greater resonance than economic evidence. Following the result, however, the romanticism of the campaign quickly gave way to political and economic realities. Continue reading

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Apr 11 2016

The Hellenic Observatory at LSE celebrates its 20th anniversary

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Kevin Oct 2013 croppedBy Kevin Featherstone

The Hellenic Observatory, located in LSE’s European Institute, celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2016. Kevin Featherstone looks back at its story so far.

In the mid-1990s, a campaign was launched to establish a Chair on Contemporary Greece that was neither concerned with the ancient or classical past, nor the arts and humanities. LSE would champion the study of contemporary Greek society, politics and economics and it established the ‘Eleftherios Venizelos Chair in Contemporary Greek Studies’. This was endowed by philanthropic donations from some thirteen donors in Greece, at the time one of the largest donations made to the School. The Chair was to be a fully tenured, academic post in LSE, established in perpetuity. Continue reading

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Apr 6 2016

Greece. The country with the half Drachma

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By Andreas Koutras

A few days after the introduction of the bank capital controls and with thousands of pensioners queuing up outside the bank branches, the Prime Minister’s Office received a piece of research on the effect of the capital controls on the electorate. The data disclosed were very surprising even counter-intuitive. It was apparent that the closing of the banks had a very small negative effect. Continue reading

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Mar 9 2016

Experiments with austerity and anti-poverty policies in Greece: “Like Hodja’s donkey: it died just after it learned not to eat”

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Arapoglou ImageBy Vassilis P. Arapoglou

In this brief note I want to summarize the scope of my presentation at the LSE research seminar on March 8, 2016. My aim is to reflect upon the findings of a research project on homelessness and poverty in the Athens, which was conducted with the support of the Hellenic Observatory and the National Bank of Greece, so as to shed some light on the contemporary debate and the negotiations between Greece and its lenders for the future of social policies in Greece. More specifically, I want to discuss the role of civil society organizations in the design and implementation of anti-poverty policies under austerity. Continue reading

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Feb 24 2016

Still Europeanized? Greek Foreign Policy during the Eurozone Crisis

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AngelosChryssogelosCropBy Angelos Chryssogelos

The Eurozone crisis is now widely seen as a threshold for Greek politics, society and state structures. While there has been heightened attention in Greece and internationally on the impact of the crisis across a range of policy areas, there has been less attention on the impact of the crisis on Greek foreign policy. Continue reading

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Feb 16 2016

NATO’s Migrant Mission in the Aegean Raises Major Questions for Greek Foreign Policy

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AngelosChryssogelosCropBy Angelos Chryssogelos

On 11 February the ministers of defense of NATO agreed to a joint proposal by Germany, Greece and Turkey to involve NATO in the efforts to stem the wave of migrants moving into the Aegean islands from Turkey. While there are still many unclear points about the exact activities of the NATO mission, the political framework of the agreement can be considered prima facie as very problematic for Greek positions and interests. Continue reading

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Feb 10 2016

The Agent-Structure Issue in Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA) – The “Macedonian” issue

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EvangelopoulosBy Georgios Evangelopoulos

It was a pleasure and an honour to spend a semester (January 2014 – July 2014) as a post-doctoral research fellow at the LSE Hellenic Observatory, during which I was preoccupied with the topic of agent-structure in International Relations Theory and Foreign Policy Analysis, attempting to apply the conclusions reached in that field to the analysis of Greek Foreign Policy towards FYROM. Continue reading

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