Feb 10 2016

The Agent-Structure Issue in Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA) – The “Macedonian” issue

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EvangelopoulosBy Georgios Evangelopoulos

It was a pleasure and an honour to spend a semester (January 2014 – July 2014) as a post-doctoral research fellow at the LSE Hellenic Observatory, during which I was preoccupied with the topic of agent-structure in International Relations Theory and Foreign Policy Analysis, attempting to apply the conclusions reached in that field to the analysis of Greek Foreign Policy towards FYROM. Continue reading

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Feb 1 2016

To live or to survive?

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PhotoThaliaMBy Thalia Magioglou

To live or to survive?
That is the question for the Greek Youth. And not only

This phrase belongs to one of the participants of my last study on Democracy, but it has been repeated by many of them: young adults between 18 and 30 year’s old. They have been interviewed in Greece, from November 2015 to January 2016. I have asked them “if I tell you the word Democracy, what comes to your mind”? The study follows a grounded theory, qualitative and psycho-political scientific approach. The objective is the social representation of democracy for the Greek Youth over time: before and during the crisis. Continue reading

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Jan 19 2016

A quick guide to one more Greek Pension Reform

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Platon914_smBy Platon Tinios

Greek ruins tend to be picturesque, blending destroyed architectural fragments with dramatic settings. The succession of columns, marbles and pediments, after a few repetitions, becomes confusing; only the tourist with the good guidebook finds her way around. She does not miss the must-see bits and is able afterwards to put all the different ruins in a sequence that makes sense and can tell a story worth remembering. Continue reading

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Jan 15 2016

Hopes and Doubts: Kyriakos Mitsotakis as New Democracy Leader

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By Angelos Chryssogelos

On 10 January the supporters of New Democracy (ND), Greece’s centre-right opposition party, elected in the second round of a primary Kyriakos Mitsotakis as the party’s eighth leader since 1974 (not counting two interim leaders). After a year of dominance of Greek politics by Syriza and Alexis Tsipras, Mitsotakis’ election by hundreds of thousands of voters carries the promise of a real alternative slowly materializing. This note will present some conclusions from the election process, and the questions and prospects that are opened up by Mitsotakis’ victory. Continue reading

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Jan 11 2016

Greek Elites and Greek-Turkish Relations: Towards an Impasse?

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D Triantaphyllou(Smallersize)By Dimitris Triantaphyllou

The ongoing economic crisis in Greece since 2008 has had an impact, primarily negative on the social, political, and economic fabric of the polity writ large. The question is whether it has had an impact on policy making as well. A recent study I conducted with my colleague Kostas Ifantis for the Hellenic Observatory with a generous grant from the National Bank of Greece on the perceptions of Greek Foreign Policy elites perceive and how they view Greece’s role in the international arena; Turkey and Turkish foreign policy; and Greek-Turkish relations may provide some answers on the impact on foreign policy making. Continue reading

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Dec 7 2015

The aftermath of the Greek Elections: Who voted for who?

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By Vasileios Bougioukos and Bernard Casey

Lots did not vote at all

Of course, the main story, apart from the fact that Syriza won, was that more people than ever before didn’t vote at all. Abstention reached a record level of 44 per cent.

Nonetheless, and especially in the light of the HO seminar of 24 November where who voted for Golden Dawn (GD) and why was discussed at length, it is worth asking not only about that party’s relative success – it got back in to parliament with seven percent of the vote, but about who did put Syriza back and whether the abstentions helped or hindered it. Continue reading

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Dec 2 2015

As the refugee crisis transforms the EU-Turkey relationship, there are no easy choices for Greek foreign policy

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By Angelos Chryssogelos

The EU-Turkey summit of last Sunday cemented Turkey’s status as an indispensable partner in the management of the refugee flows towards Europe in the eyes of EU leaders – despite mounting concerns over the state of democracy in Turkey. To this end, the summit codified a broad array of rewards the EU will extend to Turkey should it actively assist in the refugee issue. Chief among them is the revival of Turkey’s long-stalled EU accession process.

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Nov 24 2015

The Left in government again: Principled politicians and pragmatic policies – A lesson on how to square the circle

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??????????kyriakinanouBy Dimitris Sourvanos (LSE) and Kyriaki Nanou (University of Nottingham)

Last week Euclid Tsakalotos gave a talk at the LSE discussing from his own experiences – as (the current) finance minister in Greece and as a lifelong Marxist – the difficulties that left-wing parties are faced with when governing under severe constraints. Continue reading

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Nov 23 2015

The rise of the Golden Dawn in Greece

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By Antonis Ellinas 

A voluminous literature on radical right wing parties in Europe predicts that parties like the Golden Dawn are doomed to electoral failure.  Continue reading

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Nov 12 2015

Pension Poor and Housing rich in Greece? A generational perspective argues for policy entrepreneurship

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By Platon Tinios

The Greek crisis can be framed as an ageing narrative. Greece confronted dilemmas that all ageing societies are bound to face. For example, it was forced in June 2015 to choose between discharging a legal obligation – repaying the IMF– and an ethical obligation – paying pensions; ethics won out. Pensions crop up in every juncture of the crisis – most recently during the third bailout. Future ageing issues have been telescoped forward. Continue reading

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