William Beveridge

  • Lord and Lady Beveridge c1957 credit LSE Library
    Permalink Lord and Lady Beveridge c1957 credit LSE LibraryGallery

    A Beveridge Plan for an Unruly School? William Beveridge and LSE

A Beveridge Plan for an Unruly School? William Beveridge and LSE

William Beveridge was Director of LSE 1919-37, leaving for Oxford before producing his famous report in 1942. Professor Michael Cox explored his LSE career and relationship with Beatrice and Sidney Webb at the Beveridge 2.0 event A Beveridge Plan for an Unruly School? William Beveridge and LSE.

Who was Beveridge? What sort of institution did he inherit? Why was he […]

  • Beatrice Webb c19196 credit LSE Library
    Permalink Beatrice Webb c19196 credit LSE LibraryGallery

    Beatrice Webb, William Beveridge, Poverty, and the Minority Report on The Poor Law

Beatrice Webb, William Beveridge, Poverty, and the Minority Report on The Poor Law

Ahead of the Beveridge 2.0 event Five LSE Giants’ Perspectives on Poverty, Professor Lucinda Platt explores LSE founder Beatrice Webb’s 1909 Minority Report on the Poor Law, Webb’s views on poor relief and potential influence on William Beveridge. Her report, for which Beveridge was a researcher, called for national and local appropriate coordinated provision for the poor and discussed healthcare, pensions and work. 
Two influential reports
Beatrice Webb’s points of connection […]

History events at Beveridge 2.0

Listen to podcasts from the free history events at the Beveridge 2.0 LSE Festival, 19-24 February 2018. Topics include the Second World War, the Welfare State and LSE in the 1930s. The LSE Library exhibition “A Time for Revolutions: Making the Welfare State” is still open to visitors.
Listen to podcasts
Beveridge in Context: reconstruction planning during the Second World War and after
Wednesday 21 February 2018 […]

February 14th, 2018|Beveridge 2.0, Events|0 Comments|

What’s the future of the welfare state?

In 1942, former LSE Director William Beveridge launched his blueprint for a British universal care system. As part of the School’s celebration, this academic year, of the 75th anniversary of the publication of the Beveridge report, the LSE IQ podcast asks, “What’s the future of the welfare state?”

Whether it is the underfunding of the NHS or the amount we spend […]

February 9th, 2018|Beveridge 2.0|0 Comments|

William Beveridge and his Report

LSE Library’s current exhibition, A Time for Revolutions: The Making of the Welfare State, coincides with the 75th anniversary of the publication of the Beveridge Report and shows the development of social welfare in Britain from the Poor Laws to Universal Credit. Exhibition curator Inderbir Bhullar, looks at William Beveridge via his archives and his connections to LSE.

A telegram […]

Pioneers of the social sciences

LSE is a world-leading pioneer of the social sciences. Subjects like international relations, social policy, sociology, social anthropology, social psychology and criminology all have their origins as subjects of university study in the innovative work carried out by LSE academics. Here are a selection of examples from LSE’s early years.
Accountancy
Academic accountancy in Britain was pioneered at LSE by a […]

December 27th, 2017|Academic life|0 Comments|

Clare Market Review through the ages

Named after the 17th Century food market that LSE now partially occupies, Nash Croker introduces Clare Market Review. The oldest student-run journal in the UK. It began in 1905 and is relaunching for Lent term 2018.

Produced at LSE since 1905, it has been both a leading academic journal for the social sciences as well as, more recently, an important  cultural document […]

  • Beveridge portrait
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    A Vice Chancellor’s portrait – Sir William Beveridge in the Shaw Library

A Vice Chancellor’s portrait – Sir William Beveridge in the Shaw Library

William Beveridge was Director of LSE 1919-1937. In 1926 he also became Vice Chancellor of the University of London. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly finds out how LSE commissioned artist William Nicholson to paint a portrait of Beveridge to mark the occasion.

On 25 June 1926 LSE Director, William Beveridge was elected to the position of Vice Chancellor of the University of London. In […]

  • London School of Economics Coat of Arms. The beaver was adopted as the official mascot of the school in 1922, the same year the motto 'rerum cognoscere causas' was chosen – a line taken from Virgil’s Georgics meaning ‘to know the causes of things’.
    Permalink London School of Economics Coat of Arms. The beaver was adopted as the official mascot of the school in 1922, the same year the motto 'rerum cognoscere causas' was chosen – a line taken from Virgil’s Georgics meaning ‘to know the causes of things’. Credit: LSEGallery

    “Cheerful nonsense with brains behind it” – devising the LSE coat of arms

“Cheerful nonsense with brains behind it” – devising the LSE coat of arms

LSE’s coat of arms, motto “rerum cognoscere causas” and Beaver mascot were adopted in 1922 under Director William Beveridge and School Secretary Jessie Mair. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly shares the story of how they came about and who designed them. She names the winner of the School’s motto competition – and provides some of the unsuccessful entries.

Entering the Old Building from Houghton […]

James Meade and the GATT

LSE professor James Meade was a Nobel Prize-winning economist whose work shaped twentieth century international trade policy. His archives are held by LSE Library and featured in the exhibition A Wealth of Ideas: economics and LSE. Inderbir Bhullar, Curator of Economics and Social Policy at LSE Library, discusses Meade’s work along with that of LSE stalwarts Lionel Robbins and Hugh Dalton.

Trade agreements are […]