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    Confidence motions, humble addresses, and amendments: Brexit’s procedural dilemmas

Confidence motions, humble addresses, and amendments: Brexit’s procedural dilemmas

Brexit has revealed some of the tools that govern the legislative process and how these interact with party politics. Louise Thompson summarises the key procedural dilemmas faced in the Commons so far, and explains why things could get even more complicated in 2019.

As we watch the continued unfolding of the Brexit story and wait to see when (and if) […]

#3OD: OpenData, Open Dialogue, Open Democracies

Introducing the Race Disparity Audit’s Ethnicity Facts and Figures website, Zamila Bunglawala explains the importance of open and accessible data to democracies.

My dream is #3OD. That is: open data coupled with open dialogue to achieve open democracies – but we are not there yet. Not everything that counts is counted. Not everything that’s counted is accessible. And not everything […]

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    EU law empowers a big Green New Deal and state aid rules stop corporate welfare

EU law empowers a big Green New Deal and state aid rules stop corporate welfare

Membership of the EU stops arbitrary corporate welfare in the UK and expressly encourages aid for environmental protection, writes Ewan McGaughey. He explains how state aid rules work and how they empower the UK to get a New Green Deal. What stops us from changing the direction of the economy in this respect is therefore not the EU but […]

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    Is it the English question – or the British question? The three strands of Britishness

Is it the English question – or the British question? The three strands of Britishness

John Denham finds that the majority of those who identify as primarily English or equally English and British are also strongly British; they nonetheless seem to hold a different political outlook to those who identify as primarily British. He suggests that as much attention should be paid to the evolution of British identity as English identity. 

Most England residents identify […]

Remembering Lord Jeremy Heywood

Dame Minouche Shafik pays tribute to the late Lord Heywood, an outstanding civil servant and a good friend to LSE.

 

Jeremy Heywood, who passed away on 4 November 2018, was the outstanding civil servant of his generation and the indispensable advisor to four prime ministers.  He was also a friend of 33 years since we met as students at LSE while […]

December 8th, 2018|Featured|0 Comments|
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    Deal > Remain > No-deal > Deal: Brexit and the Condorcet paradox

Deal > Remain > No-deal > Deal: Brexit and the Condorcet paradox

With the possibility of a second referendum gaining increasing support, what happens if more than two options are on such a ballot paper for voters to rank? Simon Kaye explains the prospect of a Condorcet cycle and considers alternatives. He concludes that, whatever the route taken, there will always be a majority who will find the outcome of the […]

Why 2017 may have witnessed a Youthquake after all

While prominent immediately after Labour’s performance in the 2017 election, the idea of a ‘youthquake’ has since been challenged by the British Election Study team. Using the latest data from the Understanding Society survey, however, Patrick Sturgis and Will Jennings show that there was, after all, a large and significant increase in turnout amongst the under 30s.

The 2017 snap […]

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    Vote switchers: the two groups of voters whose values the main parties must understand

Vote switchers: the two groups of voters whose values the main parties must understand

Looking at voters’ values helps explain the UK’s changing electoral landscape, write Paula Surridge, Michael Turner, Robert Struthers, and Clive McDonnell. They look at vote switching between 2015 and 2017, and explain why the two main parties need to understand the values of two specific groups of voters in order to appeal to them.

The period between the 2010 general […]