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    Why the government’s crackdown on low-skilled migration is at odds with the public mood

Why the government’s crackdown on low-skilled migration is at odds with the public mood

The government has justified its intention to control migration using a salary threshold as being consistent with public opinion. Yet this does not seem to be the case, writes Johnny Runge. He discusses new research on public perceptions of ‘skill’, and explains how these are at odds with policy proposals.

Conventional wisdom has it that that British people are strongly […]

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    Why Change UK may turn out to be neither democratic nor a force for change

Why Change UK may turn out to be neither democratic nor a force for change

Lea Ypi explains why Change UK – The Independent Group appears to be aligning itself to a very different tradition of thinking about the relationship between citizens and representatives.
Modern democracy, wrote one of the great political scientists of the past century, is inconceivable – save in terms of party government. If that is true, when democracy is in […]

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    How involved is the public in changes affecting the devolved NHS?

How involved is the public in changes affecting the devolved NHS?

Ellen Stewart, Angelo Ercia, Scott Greer, and Peter Donnelly compare how the public is involved in major service changes across the UK’s four health systems. They find some clear differences between the four systems’ processes, including the extent of central government oversight and guidance.

Of the issues that have dogged health politics since the creation of the NHS, the closure […]

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    Is Brexit a constitutional crisis, or a political one? The answer matters

Is Brexit a constitutional crisis, or a political one? The answer matters

Even now, with Brexit consuming Parliament, the question of whether we are suffering a constitutional or a political crisis is important, write Anand Menon and Alan Wager. A general election might be enough to push a deal through the Commons, but it would not necessarily fix the greater problem: the damaged political legitimacy of Parliament.

What constitutes a political crisis? And when, and […]

April 22nd, 2019|Brexit, Featured|2 Comments|
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    The political roots of capital mobility: reassessing Britain’s abolition of exchange controls

The political roots of capital mobility: reassessing Britain’s abolition of exchange controls

Jack Copley explains how the Callaghan and Thatcher governments in the late 1970s were concerned by the worsening performance of British industrial exporters, and so exchange control abolition constituted a strategy to depreciate sterling and boost export competitiveness.

Exchange controls – restrictions on the purchase or sale of currencies – have been thoroughly delegitimised as an instrument of economic management […]

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    Why Britons living abroad for more than 15 years still don’t have a vote

Why Britons living abroad for more than 15 years still don’t have a vote

Britons who have lived abroad for more than 15 years lose the right to vote in UK elections. This would have changed had a Private Member’s Bill with government support passed last month – but a Conservative MP talked it out. Susan Collard says the incident reveals the shortcomings of parliamentary democracy.

MPs’ attempts to take over the parliamentary agenda are an […]

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    ‘It’s Westminster’s fault’. Political identities and blame attribution in devolved systems

‘It’s Westminster’s fault’. Political identities and blame attribution in devolved systems

In devolved systems, people may be unsure about which government does what and so who is responsible for policy outcomes. Sandra León and Lluís Orriols use a survey experiment on responsibility attribution surrounding the NHS in Scotland and Wales, and point to the role of partisanship and identity as cognitive guides in attributing credit and blame.

A Scotsman’s reader recently sent […]

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    Becoming ‘prevention ninjas’: Rethinking leadership and political will in preventive health

Becoming ‘prevention ninjas’: Rethinking leadership and political will in preventive health

John Boswell, Paul Cairney, and Emily St Denny examine agencies with responsibility for preventive health policy in Australia, New Zealand, and England. They find that building and maintaining legitimacy for such agencies may come at the expense of quick progress or radical action in service of the prevention agenda.

Most public health advocates bemoan the current balance of resources in […]