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    A nation of Brendas? What the public really thinks of a general election – and why Westminster gets it wrong

A nation of Brendas? What the public really thinks of a general election – and why Westminster gets it wrong

It is generally believed that voters are experiencing election fatigue, wanting politicians to sort things out rather than having to go to the polls again. However, data suggests the public actually support an early election. Lawrence McKay argues that this error is driven by lingering pre-Brexit concerns over public ‘apathy’ and by journalists’ anxieties about living in the Westminster […]

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    Can politicians act with impunity? The constitutional principles at stake in the prorogation case

Can politicians act with impunity? The constitutional principles at stake in the prorogation case

In considering whether the recent decision to prorogue Parliament was legal, the English and Scottish courts came to different conclusions because they considered different questions, explains Pippa Catterall, not because Scottish and English public legal approaches differ. She discusses the points of constitutional law that are at stake as the Supreme Court prepares to hear the case.

The legality of […]

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    Challenging prorogation: understanding the Court of Session decision and anticipating that of the Supreme Court

Challenging prorogation: understanding the Court of Session decision and anticipating that of the Supreme Court

Sionaidh Douglas-Scott explains the recent Court of Session decision on prorogation, why Parliament is still suspended, and concludes with how the Supreme Court may navigate the issue.

Legal cases are not always exciting. Yet some truly absorbing and significant litigation is underway, arising from challenges to the recent prorogation of Parliament. The recent judgment from the Scottish Court of Session, […]

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    Calling it quits: why some parties’ MPs leave office earlier than others

Calling it quits: why some parties’ MPs leave office earlier than others

While several studies have examined retirements from the US Congress, fewer studies have examined retirement patterns in other legislatures. Christopher D. Raymond and Marvin Overby examine partisan differences in retirement rates in Britain and Canada.

One interesting finding to emerge from the literature on the US Congress is that Republican legislators retire from office earlier in their careers than their […]

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    (Not) Coming to terms with EC membership: Labour and the common agricultural policy in the 1970s

(Not) Coming to terms with EC membership: Labour and the common agricultural policy in the 1970s

The common agricultural policy can serve as a lens to shed light on the wider question of how UK governments adapted to European Community membership, writes Katja Seidel.

The Conservative Party has fallen apart over Europe. After expelling its centrist and pro-European MPs, Boris Johnson is set on turning the Tories into a hard-line Brexit party. Labour has thus far […]

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    Brexit shows both the importance of the British Political Tradition and the extent to which it is under threat

Brexit shows both the importance of the British Political Tradition and the extent to which it is under threat

Matt Hall and David Marsh discuss what recent developments in British politics, especially since the election of Boris Johnson, tell us about the British Political Tradition – a view of democracy that emphasises a limited liberal conception of representation, which focuses on the importance of free and fair elections, and a conservative conception of responsibility based on the idea […]

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    Why did the Industrial Relations Act 1971 fail? Depoliticisation and the importance of resistance

Why did the Industrial Relations Act 1971 fail? Depoliticisation and the importance of resistance

Sam Warner explains how the attempt to depoliticise the reform of industrial relations in the 1970s was resisted and how re-politicisation was achieved.

Despite the term having a distinctly ‘academic’ ring to it, depoliticisation has a broader significance because it concerns an often taken-for-granted aspect of contemporary governance. Not to be confused with the absence or removal of politics, a […]

What can we learn from the 2011 riots?

In August 2011 England experienced the largest outbreak of rioting in a generation.

The disorder began after the shooting of young man, Mark Duggan, by police officers in Tottenham. A protest two days later morphed into more widespread disorder. Over the next three days riots spread rapidly across London, and then other urban centres in England. In total, there were […]

September 7th, 2019|Featured|0 Comments|