coalition

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    “All that is solid…”: the destructive tendencies of the Conservative Party

“All that is solid…”: the destructive tendencies of the Conservative Party

Is there a winning future for the Conservatives? Tom Barker and Conor Farrington outline the party’s recent history and find that it has often demonstrated a careless approach to institutions and objectives it has otherwise claimed to champion. For there to be a winning future, the Conservatives must seek to genuinely rebuild, rather than merely pay lip-service to, a One […]

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    Any Con-DUP deal will make winners of both parties – but at what cost to everyone else?

Any Con-DUP deal will make winners of both parties – but at what cost to everyone else?

A pact with the DUP is the best outcome Theresa May could hope for in the absence of an outright majority, while the DUP could not have dreamed up a better situation for themselves, writes Matthew Whiting. Although the focus has been on DUP’s beliefs on abortion, LGBT rights, and climate change, those views will not set the agenda, he […]

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    Redefining the political landscape: here’s how a Progressive Alliance could work

Redefining the political landscape: here’s how a Progressive Alliance could work

Talks of a Progressive Alliance emerged as soon as the snap election was called. With Theresa May polling well ahead of the rest, an alliance seems to be the only alternative to the Conservative Party’s governing style. Alan Wager explains what history can teach us about the strategic purpose of such an agreement, how it would work in terms […]

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    A drift away from majoritarianism: constitutional reform and the Coalition Government of 2010-2015

A drift away from majoritarianism: constitutional reform and the Coalition Government of 2010-2015

Constitutional matters have dominated contemporary British politics for some time, and as Brexit develops, look set to continue to do so. Here, Felicity Matthews draws on recent co-authored research to explore what influence the Coalition government of 2010-2015 had on British constitutional arrangements.

Electoral reform; #indeyref; devo-max; EVEL; elected mayors; Northern Powerhouse; Brexit; #indeyref2: it is no understatement to say […]

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    We are entering an era in which multi-party coalitions are the norm rather than the exception

We are entering an era in which multi-party coalitions are the norm rather than the exception

On its own, the fact that the 2010 general election produced a coalition government does not tell us much. But Josh Cowls argues that a repeat experience in 2015, and a second coalition government with a broad and diverse mandate, would herald the end of single-party government in the UK.

Consider the following scenario. An indifferent British electorate shrugs its […]

How will the coalition end? Cameron and Clegg may look to the precedent set by the 1945 caretaker government

Alun Wyburn-Powell provides a historical account of the 1945 caretaker government and argues that it provides a useful model for thinking about when the current coalition might end. Whilst obviously very different situations, there is good logic in parting some months prior to the start of the 2015 campaign for both the LibDems and Tories. It would allow a bit more freedom […]

The lack of attention by the government to the overlapping effects of April’s welfare changes is indicative of a poorly thought-through process

Adam Tinson analyses the combined impacts of the individual changes to the social security system which have come into force this month. He focuses on four major changes: the bedroom tax, the replacement of council tax benefit, the overall benefit cap and the uprating of out of work benefits and some elements of tax credits.  A great deal of attention has […]

The ‘progressive alliance’ idea is no longer a meaningful basis for a Labour-LibDem rapprochement, but there is much common ground that remains between the two parties

Michael Kenny argues that, despite how surprising it may sound, there is a lot of areas of agreement between the Liberal Democrats and Labour that would allow for a coalition between the two parties were the situation to arise in the future. Given the flurry of speculation about whether the current coalition might be followed in time by another made up of […]

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.