UK politics

From ‘purpose’ to ‘effect’: a principled way to decide whether prorogation is legal

Anne Twomey argued on LSE Brexit that the Supreme Court should focus on the fact that Boris Johnson has lost the confidence of the Commons. Given that he has not yet lost a vote of no confidence, Tarunabh Khaitan (University of Oxford) says this is a problematic approach. Instead, the Court should ask whether prorogation is likely to have […]

Rational high ground or compromise? Liberal strategies for coping with Brexit

How do liberal Remainers negotiate their dismay and shock at the Leave vote? Daphne Fietz (LSE) talked to nine people who voted Remain and analysed the comment section of the Guardian. She discusses how they deployed different liberal values in an effort to either distance themselves from the ‘irrationality’ of Leavers, or seek compromise.

While Brexit may be imminent, no […]

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    Immigration policy down under is coming out on top – but that’s not what UK employers and the public want

Immigration policy down under is coming out on top – but that’s not what UK employers and the public want

With the new government looking to Australia for inspiration when it comes to devising a new immigration policy, Heather Rolfe writes that the exercise is nonetheless futile: a policy designed in a different country and for different purposes will not work. Instead, she explains what the UK public and employers want.

The government has had a few things on its […]

When is prorogation ‘improper’?

What would make Boris Johnson’s prorogation of Parliament ‘improper’? Anne Twomey (University of Sydney) argues that the Supreme Court should focus on the fact that the PM has lost the confidence of the Commons – which is a breach of constitutional principle – rather than on the political advantages he might secure by shutting down Parliament.

Prorogation is primarily a procedural […]

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    Defining ‘highly skilled’ migration: the mismatch between income and labour market position

Defining ‘highly skilled’ migration: the mismatch between income and labour market position

The UK is in a strange political limbo. It appears that we are simultaneously in Brexit paralysis, whilst also hurtling headlong towards 31 October, when Boris Johnson has promised we will leave the EU ‘do or die’. But much remains uncertain – not least, what will be the immigration regime for EU citizens entering the UK post-Brexit? Helen McCarthy (Middlesex […]

The Supreme Court should repair the tear in the fabric of the constitution that prorogation has opened up

The Supreme Court is considering whether Boris Johnson’s prorogation of Parliament is lawful. Thomas Poole (LSE) says the claimants face two hurdles: one concerns the involvement of the Queen, the other whether prorogation is a purely political or a justiciable issue. He argues that the court should recognise that the power to prorogue has legal limits.

On 28 August, the […]

Brexit crunch time: do all paths lead to an early election?

There are plausible reasons to think that an early election is likely, writes Hudson Meadwell (McGill University). In this blog, he outlines the possible paths that lead there. The two most likely paths to an early election, in his view, are new deal-ratification-withdraw-early election or no new deal-withdraw-early election.

I expect that prorogation will eventually be ruled lawful (if not constitutional). Jonathan Sumption, a former […]

Challenging prorogation: understanding the Court of Session decision and anticipating that of the Supreme Court

Sionaidh Douglas-Scott (Queen Mary University of London) explains the recent Court of Session decision on prorogation. The Supreme Court may ultimately declare the issue to be non-justiciable – but it could then be possible for Boris Johnson to prorogue Parliament for a much longer period.
Legal cases are not always exciting. Yet some truly absorbing and significant litigation is underway, arising […]

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    Parliament’s role in the Brexit process: parallels with Israel and the Knesset

Parliament’s role in the Brexit process: parallels with Israel and the Knesset

The suspension of Parliament in a ‘no-written constitution’ legal context has left the UK in constitutional limbo. In this blog, Solon Solomon offers some thoughts on the Israeli constitutional experience. He argues that Parliament should have a substantial role in the Brexit process, let alone be permitted to sit in the first place.

On September 11, the Scottish Court of Session, Scotland’s […]

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    What policy do British voters want on EU immigration? Is there a hidden consensus?

What policy do British voters want on EU immigration? Is there a hidden consensus?

Very few British people know about restrictions on freedom of movement allowed under existing EU regulations. Yet when they learn about the EU’s “three-month rule”, two-thirds (64%) say it would provide “enough control” over EU immigration. And 67% say that they would support the introduction of ID cards if it meant the authorities could enforce restrictions applied in other […]