Places

Explore the history of behind the places on LSE’s campus – past and present.

Hammering out a new world – the Fabian Window at LSE

On the 20 April 2006 Tony Blair unveiled the Fabian Window, newly installed in the Shaw Library on a long term loan by the Webb Memorial Trust. In 2017 thanks to the generosity of the Webb Memorial Trust, the window became part of the School’s art collections. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, writes about the window’s creation and its chequered […]

Carr-Saunders Hall – living in Bloomsbury

On 13 June 1967 students, staff and guests sat down to a dinner of salmon, chicken, strawberries and cheese accompanied by Pouilly Fuissé 1964 and Chateauneuf du Pape 1962 to celebrate the opening of LSE’s second hall of residence. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly shares the story of the founding of Carr-Saunders Hall.

The development of the hall was far from […]

September 5th, 2017|Places, Student life|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Square the Block by Richard WilsonGallery

    All is not as it seems – Square the Block by Richard Wilson

All is not as it seems – Square the Block by Richard Wilson

Head to the junction of Kingsway and Sardinia Street. Look up! LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly introduces Square the Block by Richard Wilson.

If you walk down Kingsway from Holborn Station to the Aldwych you may be slightly taken aback when you glance at the corner of the New Academic Building facing Sardinia Street and Kingsway. While the top of the building […]

Women in art – the Shaw Library

LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly takes a trip to the Shaw Library to find out more about some of the women who created or feature in LSE art works. The Shaw Library (once known as the Founders’ Room) opened in 1928 and today its art works represent significant figures in the history of the School.
Beatrice and Sidney Webb (1928) by William Nicholson
The […]

Harry Warren Wilson and the St Clement’s building panel

Harry Warren Wilson designed the St Clement’s building panel which has overlooked Portugal Street since the 1960’s. Sue Donnelly, LSE Archivist, uncovers the controversy surrounding its creation.

In 1959 the School began work on the refurbishment of the St Clement’s Press building overlooking Clare Market, now known as the St Clement’s building. As part of the work the School commissioned the artist Harry […]

January 9th, 2017|Art on campus, Places|1 Comment|
  • George Duckworth’s interview with Sister Matron Katherine Monk, 1898
    Permalink George Duckworth’s interview with Sister Matron Katherine Monk, 1898Gallery

    A Hospital on Portugal Street – King’s College Hospital and the Inquiry into London Life and Labour

A Hospital on Portugal Street – King’s College Hospital and the Inquiry into London Life and Labour

LSE’s Library sits on one of the most interesting sites on the campus, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly. In the past it has been a graveyard, a workhouse and from 1839 to 1913 it was the site of King’s College Hospital.

King’s College Hospital opened in a converted workhouse on Portugal Street in 1839. The workhouse was replaced by a […]

December 15th, 2016|LSE Library, Places|0 Comments|

The LSE Penguin by Yolanda Vandergaast

Over the past 11 years the Penguin has become a much loved LSE character, happy to pose in a stream of graduation photographs whatever the London weather. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly shares the story behind the Penguin.

The Penguin, made of aluminium and just over a metre tall, was made by the Canadian sculptor, Yolanda Vandergaast. Vandergaast was born in […]

December 6th, 2016|Art on campus, Places|0 Comments|

The Webb portrait

Featuring two of LSE’s founders, the Webb portrait hangs above the fireplace in the Shaw Library. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly tells the story of Sidney and Beatrice Webb at Passfield Corner by William Nicholson.

“In the present year Mr and Mrs Sidney Webb keep a joint seventieth birthday and it is proposed to celebrate this event by securing the painting of […]

The world below – archaeology at LSE

LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly writes about this Spring’s archaeological dig on Houghton Street at LSE.

London’s many building sites are the source of frequent disruption and irritation but they also provide opportunities to find out more about the history hidden beneath the buildings and streets. The preparatory works for the Centre Buildings Redevelopment was an opportunity to discover what lies […]

August 26th, 2016|Hidden LSE, Places|1 Comment|
  • Women lining up for a race, LSE Sports Day at Malden, 1920s
    Permalink Women lining up for a race, LSE Sports Day at Malden, 1920sGallery

    All work and no play – the early years of the LSE sports ground

All work and no play – the early years of the LSE sports ground

Sport at LSE has a long history, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly, as is proved by the 1911 photograph of the first hockey team. But the acquisition of the Malden sports ground in 1921 encouraged sports of all kinds to flourish at LSE.

Under Director William Beveridge Houghton Street saw constant building, but LSE expansion also included the acquisition of […]