Monthly Archives: March 2016

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    Minority views? Labour members had been longing for someone like Corbyn before he was even on the ballot paper

Minority views? Labour members had been longing for someone like Corbyn before he was even on the ballot paper

Recent media reports suggest Labour MPs may be gearing up to move against Jeremy Corbyn. This is supposed to happen before a change in rules could see the number of nominations needed for any would-be candidate to enter a leadership contest reduced. Yet Corbyn was not elected by mistake, explain Tim Bale, Paul Webb and Monica Poletti. A large number of Labour members – whether […]

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    #IWD2016: 5 Great Reads from 2015 on Women, Gender and Feminisms for International Women’s Day 2016

#IWD2016: 5 Great Reads from 2015 on Women, Gender and Feminisms for International Women’s Day 2016

Image Credit: Feminist Power Poster (Jonathan McIntosh)
This week, on March 8th, it was International Women’s Day: a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women. For the occasion, LSE Review of Booksrecommends 5 great reads from the past year on women, gender and feminisms.

This reading list is part of a theme week marking International Women’s Day 2016. […]

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    The extraordinarily rigid planning system is the main reason homes in England are unaffordable

The extraordinarily rigid planning system is the main reason homes in England are unaffordable

Housing space in England is currently the most expensive and unaffordable in the world. Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen identify three reasons for this problem: the regulatory constraints, the scarcity of suitable land, and the uneven topography, all make it difficult to build affordable homes.

House prices in the South East of England would have been roughly 25 percent lower […]

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    The UK’s new electoral map means fewer votes, many changed constituencies – and perhaps enhanced Conservative prospects for 2020

The UK’s new electoral map means fewer votes, many changed constituencies – and perhaps enhanced Conservative prospects for 2020

The boundary review process began last week following the publication of the electorate figures that the Boundary Commissions will use. Ron Johnston digests the numbers and looks ahead to the likely outcomes of the review. He suggests that, barring very large alterations in the patterns of party support, it is likely to enhance Conservative prospects in 2020.

An exercise to […]

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    Omnishambles averted? Four tips for any Chancellor wanting to reform pensions

Omnishambles averted? Four tips for any Chancellor wanting to reform pensions

George Osborne was probably right to back down on his plans for the next wave of pension tax reform. But any future Chancellor wishing to tackle it would do well to rethink the process for change as well as the policy, writes Jill Rutter. Here, she offers four tips they might want to consider before embarking on pension – […]

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    Invisible citizens: the referendum and EU nationals living in the UK

Invisible citizens: the referendum and EU nationals living in the UK

With the exception of individuals from Ireland, Malta and Cyprus, non-British EU nationals living in the UK will not be permitted to vote in the country’s referendum on EU membership. These eligibility rules are similar to the rules applying to the 2015 UK general election. Veerle Heyvaert writes that although it would have been counter-productive for the ‘remain’ campaign […]

March 10th, 2016|Brexit, Featured|2 Comments|
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    The obstacles facing sex worker unionisation suggest occupational, rather than workplace unionism, could be a way forward

The obstacles facing sex worker unionisation suggest occupational, rather than workplace unionism, could be a way forward

In Britain, sex workers – unlike other workers – find they have a combined, triple hurdle to overcome in order to secure representation of their collective labour interests through unionisation. Based on research from his new book, Gregor Gall outlines how, due to the nature of the industry, the notion of occupational unionism may have some particular purchase as […]

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    The ‘Snooper’s Charter’: you can’t deny message encryption to some individuals without denying it to all

The ‘Snooper’s Charter’: you can’t deny message encryption to some individuals without denying it to all

The exact scope of the UK’s Investigatory Powers Bill is not clear and, if the Home Office continues to denies this, then can realistically presume that it does seek to undermine end-to-end encryption, argues Paul Bernal. However, to try and deny this ‘guaranteed safe space’ to law-breaking individuals can only deny this space to all individuals. It looks likely, then, that the Home Office is […]