LSE BPP

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So far LSE BPP has created 1712 entries.
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    The role of sacrality in British state-supported Holocaust remembrance

The role of sacrality in British state-supported Holocaust remembrance

British Holocaust remembrance has dramatically grown in prominence since the 1990s. David Tollerton discusses the changing ways in which public Holocaust memory has intersected with the politics of New Labour and Conservative-led governments.

When David Cameron launched his Prime Minister’s Holocaust Commission in 2014, he declared that its mission to preserve public memory of the murder of six million European […]

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    The impact of DWP benefit sanctions on anxiety and depression

The impact of DWP benefit sanctions on anxiety and depression

Evan Williams presents evidence showing that benefit sanctions lead to increases in claimants’ anxiety and depression, and argues that a re-assessment of the role of sanctions is needed as the UK slowly emerges from lockdown.

In response to enduring high unemployment after the 2008 financial crisis, the Coalition Government (2010-15) relied on a ‘massive campaign of sanctions’ to reduce benefit […]

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    COVID-19 mutual aid groups have the potential to increase intergroup solidarity – but can they actually do so?

COVID-19 mutual aid groups have the potential to increase intergroup solidarity – but can they actually do so?

Emma O’Dwyer discusses some preliminary findings on COVID-19 mutual aid groups and explains why the demographic and political characteristics of their members query their capacity to drive intergroup solidarity.

At the outset of the crisis, COVID-19 mutual aid groups (CMAGs) developed across the UK to support vulnerable and shielded members of their communities. At the time of writing, these groups […]

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    The future of politics after COVID-19: Four trends that are already discernible

The future of politics after COVID-19: Four trends that are already discernible

While the many effects that COVID-19 will have on politics are still being determined, it is possible to discern a number of relevant trends, writes Jonathan Wheatley. He discusses the likely impacts of the pandemic on the divide in economic and cultural values, gender politics, the future of the EU, and the future of the UK.

2020 has been a […]

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    Why has the pandemic increased support for Universal Basic Income?

Why has the pandemic increased support for Universal Basic Income?

COVID-19 has led to a marked increase in positive discussion of Universal Basic Income in political and media circles. Yet we do not know whether there has been a corresponding increase in support for the policy in the public at large, and if so why. Daniel Nettle presents two studies on this question carried out in April and May […]

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    The UK state after COVID-19: Britain needs a system of government which is holistic, anticipatory, and intelligent

The UK state after COVID-19: Britain needs a system of government which is holistic, anticipatory, and intelligent

While Cummings’s vision for reforming government looks even more questionable in the light of the pandemic, it is not sufficient simply to attack ideas of reform, writes Patrick Diamond. He explains what system of government Britain needs in order to be better able to solve problems in the future.

Although Dominic Cummings remains the Prime Minister’s Chief Political Adviser, the […]

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    Behavioral public performance: Making effective use of metrics about government activity

Behavioral public performance: Making effective use of metrics about government activity

Oliver James, Donald Moynihan, Asmus Olsen and Gregg van Ryzin discuss how insights from behavioural science show the way managers, politicians and citizens make sense of, and act on, information about government performance.

Over the past four decades, two revolutions arose separately but parallel to one another. The first is a revolution in governance that has made quantification of performance […]

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    On statues and history: The dialogue between past and present in public space

On statues and history: The dialogue between past and present in public space

Pippa Catterall discusses the role of monuments in public spaces and argues that they represent what people in the past chose to celebrate and memorialise. Consequently, they do not represent history but mediate a conversation between past and present.

Britain’s public spaces throng with statuary and monuments. Mostly erected during Victorian times, these represent what the elites who controlled these […]