Artemis Photiadou

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So far Artemis Photiadou has created 1431 entries.
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    Brexit and parliamentary legitimation: beyond constitutional minutiae

Brexit and parliamentary legitimation: beyond constitutional minutiae

David Judge writes that, while much of the discussion around Brexit and Parliament is about procedure and conventions, it should also be about the bigger picture: what does Brexit tell us about the fundamental principles of the UK’s parliamentary state and representative democracy?

Politicians and the punditocracy have become consumed with the minutiae of parliamentary procedure and constitutional conventions – […]

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    Governing as a permanent form of campaigning: why the civil service is in mortal danger

Governing as a permanent form of campaigning: why the civil service is in mortal danger

Patrick Diamond writes that the process of governing is being transformed into a highly politicised form of campaigning, with polling and short-term politics being more important to Ministers than long-term policy. This puts the capacity of the state to steer a sensible course through the perilous post-Brexit landscape in serious doubt.     

Dominic Cummings’ arrival as chief strategist in Downing […]

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    Only a new unity government can effectively avert a no-deal Brexit

Only a new unity government can effectively avert a no-deal Brexit

If the UK is not to crash out of the European Union with no deal, Jonathan Boston argues that the current one-party political control of the executive will need to be temporarily suspended.

There is a clear majority view of the House of Commons that any withdrawal from the EU must be an agreed and orderly one, with clear succession […]

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    The Rising of the North of 1569 and the enduring geographical fault lines in English life

The Rising of the North of 1569 and the enduring geographical fault lines in English life

The story of the Northern Rising of 1569, writes John Tomaney, points to enduring geographical fault lines in English life, albeit reworked in different historical contexts. But themes of an indifferent Court and a region let down by its leaders resonate today.

450 years ago, the north of England rose in rebellion against the Tudor state. Its leaders were Thomas […]

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    Between a rock and a hard place: using tectonics to explore the nature of gentrification

Between a rock and a hard place: using tectonics to explore the nature of gentrification

Patrick Mulrenan and Jane Lewis hope to re-imagine the analogy of ‘social tectonics’ developed by Butler and Robson in their study of gentrification in Brixton in 2001. They argue that, like tectonic plates, communities constantly pull apart, collide into one another and glide past each other, reshaping the urban environment.

Urban spaces are the site of constant physical and social […]

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    Domestic Abuse Bill: government policy on economic abuse is inconsistent

Domestic Abuse Bill: government policy on economic abuse is inconsistent

Marilyn Howard explains why the proposed statutory definition of domestic abuse, which includes economic abuse, is incompatible with how the latter is facilitated through another government policy – Universal Credit.

In her final days in office, former Prime Minister Theresa May introduced the Domestic Abuse Bill into the House of Commons. The Bill includes a new statutory definition of domestic […]

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    From burdens to assets, and back again: shifting UK press portrayals of EU migrants

From burdens to assets, and back again: shifting UK press portrayals of EU migrants

During the referendum campaign, most national newspapers problematised free movement, only to emphasise the economic costs of ending it after the vote, finds James Morrison. Six months on, however, discourses framing migrants as ‘invaders’ or ‘exploiters’ resurfaced.

There’s nothing very surprising about an analysis of UK press coverage of European Union free movement which concludes that migrants have typically been […]

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    The ‘man of the people’: what would Plato think of Boris Johnson?

The ‘man of the people’: what would Plato think of Boris Johnson?

Lea Ypi uses Plato’s Republic to look at how he described the danger of proto-populists and demagogues to democracy. She explains how Plato’s analysis applies in a contemporary context.
Shortly after Boris Johnson was elected Prime Minister, Donald Trump made a statement that was – perhaps surprisingly – partly true. ‘We have a really good man who’s going to be […]