Artemis Photiadou

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So far Artemis Photiadou has created 1278 entries.

Book Review: The British General Election of 2017

In The British General Election of 2017, the latest in the venerable Nuffield series on British elections since 1945, Philip Cowley and Dennis Kavanagh explore one of the most extraordinary political events of the young century in the UK: the British General Election of 2017. While not able to produce a fully coherent explanation of the results, the volume […]

February 17th, 2019|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Do British sources influence US opinion on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

Do British sources influence US opinion on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

Matthew Leep and Jeremy Pressman find that foreign criticism of Israel is modestly consequential, but is generally on par with domestic (American) criticism. They also suggest that Americans might be willing to discount foreign criticism in the face of bipartisan domestic support for Israel.

Foreign sources potentially provide important information and perspectives on international affairs for domestic audiences. While […]

February 15th, 2019|Featured|0 Comments|
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    MPs with constituencies far from Westminster choose different ways to represent their voters

MPs with constituencies far from Westminster choose different ways to represent their voters

MPs face demands on their time in both Westminster and their constituency. The greater the distance between the area they represent and Parliament, the more this requires trade-offs. David M. Willumsen finds that the type of parliamentary activities an MP takes part in is affected by the distance of their constituency from Westminster, which has implications for the principle […]

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    Rent controls in London? What is being suggested is not new – indeed it looks pretty mainstream

Rent controls in London? What is being suggested is not new – indeed it looks pretty mainstream

As part of his re-elction bid, Sadiq Khan has hinted that he is considering introducing rent controls across London. Christine Whitehead explains what has actually been suggested, how it compares to private rented sectors elsewhere in Europe, and who may stand to gain from such changes.

In January 2019, Sadiq Khan announced that he had asked James Murray, Deputy Mayor […]

February 13th, 2019|Featured, LSE Comment|0 Comments|
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    Rethinking the impact of government expenditure and how it is accounted for

Rethinking the impact of government expenditure and how it is accounted for

David Walker sets out the case for a more devolved, accountable, and reliable public audit system, and offers ambitious proposals for unifying the way services are assessed. Such reforms could go a long way in restoring public trust in government credibility when it comes to expenditure.

A century ago, a distinguished LSE political scientist railed against auditors. To William A […]

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    Low income households under austerity: a notable rise in debt for essential needs

Low income households under austerity: a notable rise in debt for essential needs

Looking at low income household indebtedness in austerity Britain, Hulya Dagdeviren and Jiayi Balasuriya find that the poorest households have experienced the greatest growth in unsecured debt to income ratio. More importantly, unlike the pre-crisis period when debt reflected a desire ‘to keep up with the Joneses’, in recent years there has been a rise in debt for essential […]

Are there any benefits to divided parliamentary parties?

Intra-party dissent is generally considered a bad thing – for parties seeking power and for voters wishing to make sense of political conflicts. However, using a survey experiment to test people’s responses to different forms of intra-party policy disputes, Eric Merkley finds that there are circumstances in which voters find moderate divisions useful as cues for evaluating policy choices […]

Enlargement and exit: The origins of Article 50

While it is sometimes compared to a federal superstate, the European Union is different from most federations in that it contains an exit clause: Article 50. But how did Article 50 come to be? Based on a new study, Martijn Huysmans provides a theoretical and empirical account of its origins in the 2002-03 Convention on the Future of Europe.

The […]

February 7th, 2019|Brexit, Featured|1 Comment|