Artemis Photiadou

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    Business rates: how reform can benefit both business and public services

Business rates: how reform can benefit both business and public services

Organisations across the political, public, and business sectors see business rates as outdated and problematic. Reforming the system could have profound consequences for business vitality and regional development, while also having the potential for securing the proceeds of local wealth creation, explains Kevin Muldoon-Smith.

Business rates – originally a simple property tax based on a periodical Treasury assessment of rateable […]

How not to recruit postal voters in the UK

Joshua Townsley and Stuart Turnbull-Dugarte tested the ability of parties to recruit postal voters in a field experiment carried out during the 2018 local elections in London. The result? Sending personal letters persuading voters to become postal voters is not an effective recruitment technique.

Postal voting, in line with other forms of early or ‘absentee’ voting, is a growing phenomenon […]

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    Are UK politicians ‘local’? General elections and the trend towards greater English regionalism

Are UK politicians ‘local’? General elections and the trend towards greater English regionalism

Updating previous research comparing MPs’ constituencies with their place of birth, Rob Gandy analyses the composition of Parliament as it emerged in the 2017 general election. The new analysis continues to support the argument that localism is on the rise.

I previously discussed on this blog the degree to which UK politicians were ‘local’, using a high-level proxy of the […]

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    How putting A-level results in context can improve access to the UK’s best universities

How putting A-level results in context can improve access to the UK’s best universities

Carl Cullinane and Laura Bruce explain how and why universities should step up the use of contextual admissions in order to meaningfully achieve fair access to leading higher education institutions.

The problem of unequal access to university is one of the most high-profile issues in British education. It is also a stubborn one. Despite substantial media attention and investment in […]

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    Book Review: Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why it Matters Now

Book Review: Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why it Matters Now

In Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why it Matters Now, former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger offers an appraisal of news media today, drawing on his experience at the helm of the British newspaper that broke notable news stories relating to phone hacking, Wikileaks and the National Security Agency (NSA) revelations. While the book could include more self-reflection when it comes […]

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    Reading political tea leaves: a new forecasting model for British general elections

Reading political tea leaves: a new forecasting model for British general elections

Political polling has faced difficulties during recent elections. Drawing on methods used for US elections and elsewhere, Philippe Mongrain  proposes a new forecasting model, which takes into account the state of the economy, the cost of ruling for the incumbent party, leadership approval ratings and previous election results, and offers some improvements on existing polls for forecasting the vote […]

March 16th, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|
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    Will she, won’t she? The evasive communicative style of Theresa May

Will she, won’t she? The evasive communicative style of Theresa May

Based on the 23 sessions of PMQs held during Theresa May’s first term of office, Peter Bull finds that her mean reply rate to questions from Jeremy Corbyn was just 11%. He also explains that her equivocation style was covert, characterised by ignoring or modifying questions, stating or implying that she had already answered questions, and acknowledging questions without […]

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    Austerity in English local government: why collaboration was not the answer after all

Austerity in English local government: why collaboration was not the answer after all

To cope with austerity, local councils were encouraged to pool resources and share back-office administration (e.g. legal counsel and internal audit). Was this type of collaboration worth it? Thomas Elston and Ruth Dixon find no evidence that sharing administration or tax services has helped councils manage budget cuts.

Whether by historical standards, or compared with other parts of the public sector, […]