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So far LSE BPP has created 1618 entries.
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    COVID-19 as the ultimate leadership challenge: making critical decisions without enough data

COVID-19 as the ultimate leadership challenge: making critical decisions without enough data

Martin Lodge and Arjen Boin discuss the political decision-making challenges of the novel coronavirus pandemic. They look at past crises and analyse three types of coping strategies available.

We are in crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic is causing an escalating number of victims and a free-falling global economy. It is likely to get much worse before we will see any improvements. […]

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    Abortion and COVID-19: why we need to support women’s right to abortion in health emergencies

Abortion and COVID-19: why we need to support women’s right to abortion in health emergencies

Clare Wenham, Ernestina Coast, Katy Footman, Tiziana Leone, Rishita Nandagiri, and Joe Strong discuss the UK government’s apparent U-turn over medical abortion during the novel coronavirus outbreak. They draw on their own research and other evidence to make the case for women being able to take abortion medication at home, following a phone or video consultation.

On 23 March, the […]

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    COVID-19: an overview of the government’s economic priorities so far

COVID-19: an overview of the government’s economic priorities so far

Paul Anand highlights the key economic policies announced in response to the ongoing pandemic and assesses their likely implications. He concludes that existential threats to economic systems seem not to be as rare as we believed, and so economists ought to be giving more thought to how we respond to them.

The novel coronavirus pandemic has seen policy-makers shift […]

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    Growing part-time employment among men: a UK success story or part-time penalty?

Growing part-time employment among men: a UK success story or part-time penalty?

Research on part‐time work has concentrated on the experiences of women but male part‐time employment is growing in the UK. Tracey Warren and Clare Lyonette find clear evidence of low‐quality male part‐time employment, when compared with men’s full‐time jobs. Men working part‐time also express deteriorating satisfaction with jobs overall and in several specific dimensions of their jobs. 

More and more […]

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    How will lessons from Windrush be learned when the Home Office is institutionally resistant to learning?

How will lessons from Windrush be learned when the Home Office is institutionally resistant to learning?

The essential finding of the Windrush Lessons Learned Review is that the Home Office will not engage in learning from its past, writes Mike Slaven. He discusses the Review’s findings and argues that a value change at the Home Office – the key lesson from the Windrush Scandal – would not serve this government’s policy.

The government’s decision to bury […]

COVID-19 and economic lessons from previous pandemics

Looking at past pandemics, Costas Milas expects the economic downturn caused by the novel coronavirus to be significant but temporary. He also explains why some wages rise during such episodes and why unemployment benefits must rise as well.

Diseases cause panic and take a significant social and economic toll. The Black Death, for instance, which lasted between 1348 and 1350, […]

European health systems and COVID-19: Some early lessons

COVID-19 is putting unprecedented pressure on European healthcare systems. Tamara Popic draws together some early lessons, arguing that the crisis should prompt a rethink of the direction of healthcare policies across Europe, and that the principle of solidarity must now move to the forefront as countries seek to mitigate the impact of the outbreak.

The spread of COVID-19 has put new pressures […]

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    COVID-19 and the language of pathology: when public health vocabularies advance into parallel domains

COVID-19 and the language of pathology: when public health vocabularies advance into parallel domains

Jonathan White explains why analogies associated with public health tend to be used in areas unrelated to the latter, such as the economy and migration. He writes that such perspectives can often be a way to rationalise limited intervention on the part of authorities, as well as to detach issues from their social and political context, limiting this way […]