Book Reviews

In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books relevant to British politics and policy. Each Sunday we publish a review originating from the LSE Review of Books, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

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    Book Review: Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe in Them

Book Review: Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe in Them

In Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe in Them, Joseph Uscinski presents a collection that brings together contributors to offer an wide-ranging take on conspiracy theories, examining them as historical phenomena, psychological quirks, expressions of power relations and political instruments. While this is an interesting and expansive volume, writes Max Budra, it overlooks the conundrum posed by conspiracy theories that […]

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    Book Review | Posh Boys: How the English Public Schools Ruin Britain

Book Review | Posh Boys: How the English Public Schools Ruin Britain

In Posh Boys: How the English Public Schools Ruin Britain, Robert Verkaik explores the role that public schooling plays in reproducing inequality in Britain, showing how public schools enable wealthy families to pass down their privilege to their children who subsequently have greater access to the most lucrative and powerful areas of British society. Grounded in statistical evidence, this is a valuable […]

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    Book Review: The Political Value of Time: Citizenship, Duration and Democratic Justice

Book Review: The Political Value of Time: Citizenship, Duration and Democratic Justice

In The Political Value of Time: Citizenship, Duration and Democratic Justice, Elizabeth F. Cohen explores how scientifically measured durational time is valued and used by liberal democratic states in political processes. Iris Lim recommends this for the care and precision that Cohen exhibits in her comprehensive effort at showing durational time to be at the core of how sovereign states function. 
The […]

Book Review: An Anthropology of Marxism

In An Anthropology of Marxism, reissued posthumously, Cedric J. Robinson provides a novel lens for deconstructing the work of Karl Marx by challenging Marx’s assertion that capitalism is an essential precondition for socialism. Robinson’s account holds great potential as a tool of political praxis, writes Eric Loefflad, and its critique of Marxism offers a new dimension of Marxist strategy for […]

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    The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era by Barry Eichengreen

The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era by Barry Eichengreen

In The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era, Barry Eichengreen places the surge of new populisms within deep historical context, looking at the convulsions caused by populist agitators and the response from the political establishment. Diogo Senra Rodeiro recommends this clear and highly informative analysis. 
The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era. Barry Eichengreen. […]

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    Thinking Like a Political Scientist: A Practical Guide to Research Methods

Thinking Like a Political Scientist: A Practical Guide to Research Methods

In Thinking like a Political Scientist: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, Christopher Howard makes a compelling case for transforming how research methods are taught to undergraduate students of political science. Through its accessible, easy-to-follow approach, this new guide equips and encourages the next generation of political scientists to undertake research that has the potential to directly impact pressing […]

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    Book Review: Gender and Precarious Research Careers: A Comparative Analysis

Book Review: Gender and Precarious Research Careers: A Comparative Analysis

In Gender and Precarious Research Careers: A Comparative Analysis, editors Annalisa Murgia and Barbara Poggio bring together contributors to offer an essential interrogation of the neoliberal restructuring of universities and the particular impact this has on women in the early stages of their research careers. This is a powerful account of the ways in which gender and precarity are intertwined in […]

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    Book Review: Commodity: The Global Commodity System in the 21st Century

Book Review: Commodity: The Global Commodity System in the 21st Century

In Commodity: The Global Commodity System in the 21st Century, Photis Lysandrou offers a critical analysis of the global commodity system and its various developmental tendencies. This is an excellent book, writes Scott Lavery, which deftly charts how financialised capitalism rose to ascendance and its impact on the world economy in the twenty-first century, while also pointing to fruitful areas of […]