Book Reviews

In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books relevant to British politics and policy. Each Sunday we publish a review originating from the LSE Review of Books, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review | British Muslims: New Directions in Islamic Thought, Creativity and Activism

Book Review | British Muslims: New Directions in Islamic Thought, Creativity and Activism

In British Muslims: New Directions in Islamic Thought, Creativity and Activism, Philip Lewis and Sadek Hamid demonstrate how new generations are remaking Islamic institutional infrastructures in Britain. In so doing, the book challenges scholars and policy practitioners to revise their representations of Muslim institutions in the UK and to argue for an different, updated understanding of what British Islam really looks like, writes Stephen […]

August 18th, 2019|Book Reviews|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review | Stretching the Constitution: The Brexit Shock in Historic Perspective

Book Review | Stretching the Constitution: The Brexit Shock in Historic Perspective

In Stretching the Constitution: The Brexit Shock in Historic Perspective, Andrew Blick situates Brexit within the wider context of UK constitutional reform debates over the course of the past century. Blick’s unconventional approach to this topic is insightful, providing instructive historical context to contemporary discussions of Brexit that will be of particular value for scholars of constitutional affairs, writes Gary Wilson. 
Stretching […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review | Engines of Privilege: Britain’s Private School Problem

Book Review | Engines of Privilege: Britain’s Private School Problem

In Engines of Privilege: Britain’s Private School Problem, Francis Green and David Kynaston critically explore the issues surrounding private schooling in Britain and the possible avenues through which these can be solved through government policy. This is a highly valuable contribution to debates surrounding education and inequality in the UK, writes Ross Goldstone, providing evidence-based and thoughtful consideration of how the private […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review | Heroes or Villains? The Blair Government Reconsidered

Book Review | Heroes or Villains? The Blair Government Reconsidered

In Heroes or Villains? The Blair Government Reconsidered, Jon Davis and John Rentoul seek to counter the negative prevailing view of Tony Blair and the New Labour government, focusing on key areas of criticism. This is a fascinating study packed with first-hand accounts and primary sources, writes Robert Ledger, and is a vital addition to the literature on the Blair government […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review | A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy

Book Review | A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy

In A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy, Russell Muirhead and Nancy L. Rosenblum identify and outline the emergence of a new type of conspiracist thinking in our contemporary moment, showing it to pose a fundamental threat to democratic functioning. While questioning whether the book ascribes too much intentionality to those engaging in ‘the […]

Book Review: Global Burnout

In Global Burnout, Pascal Chabot examines the phenomenon of burnout, locating it as a direct result of the spirit of our age and its overriding values. While Chabot’s work seeks more to untangle the threads of the problem than offer a solution, this is a superb work of philosophical narrative, writes Roderick Howlett, in search of a way to re-enchant our […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe in Them

Book Review: Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe in Them

In Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe in Them, Joseph Uscinski presents a collection that brings together contributors to offer an wide-ranging take on conspiracy theories, examining them as historical phenomena, psychological quirks, expressions of power relations and political instruments. While this is an interesting and expansive volume, writes Max Budra, it overlooks the conundrum posed by conspiracy theories that […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review | Posh Boys: How the English Public Schools Ruin Britain

Book Review | Posh Boys: How the English Public Schools Ruin Britain

In Posh Boys: How the English Public Schools Ruin Britain, Robert Verkaik explores the role that public schooling plays in reproducing inequality in Britain, showing how public schools enable wealthy families to pass down their privilege to their children who subsequently have greater access to the most lucrative and powerful areas of British society. Grounded in statistical evidence, this is a valuable […]