General Election 2015

The last general election was held on 7 May 2015. Here, we’ve compiled all our relevant articles that cover the theme.

Could electoral reform really happen?

Could the results of today’s general election really lead to change in the electoral system? Many commentators seem to think yes. Alan Renwick here offers some reason for caution.

Lots of people are suddenly talking about electoral reform. Never mind that the British electorate voted by 68 per cent to 32 per cent in a referendum in 2011 against dropping First Past […]

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    British foreign policy and the 2015 general election: Consensus on the continuity of a confused vision

British foreign policy and the 2015 general election: Consensus on the continuity of a confused vision

In place of a unifying foreign policy strategy or agenda, the main parties head into the general election with little to differentiate them and with little sense of long-term vision, writes Jonathan Gilmore. The main parties seem united in seeing an expanding horizon for a prosperous, globally influential Britain – a responsible, humane and internationalist power – but one which […]

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    Deep-rooted vested interests are to blame for our housing crisis

Deep-rooted vested interests are to blame for our housing crisis

There is today pretty much universal agreement among politicians that we have a serious housing crisis where the main losers are the young generation and the problem is one of supply. So why aren’t things changing? The reason is a powerful array of deeply embedded vested interests that make meaningful change difficult, explains Christian Hilber.

The UK housing affordability crisis […]

What would the election look like under PR?

The further fragmentation of the UK’s party system in 2015 is likely to lead to the most disproportionate outcome of any election in the post-war era. In this post, Jack Blumenau and Simon Hix, along with the team from electionforecast.co.uk, ask what the House of Commons might look like if the election were held under a more proportionate voting […]

Voter power to the people?

Of the many indicators of various kinds hosted on the constituency pages of the Democratic Dashboard , none gets such a reaction as the Voter Power Index. In this article, Carl Cullinane explains how, because of the UK’s First Past The Post electoral system, some voters come to wield far more influence than others. Not only is this unfair, but the inequity that comes […]

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    Survey results show a renewed politics of redistribution in the UK

Survey results show a renewed politics of redistribution in the UK

In this article, Bart Cammaerts presents the findings of a representative survey he conducted into people’s attitudes towards the aftermath of the financial crisis and austerity. His results show that the majority of people in the UK do not consider that they are necessarily better off after five years of coalition governement, and that there has been a broad shift towards what he calls a […]

From Devo-max to West Lothian-Max

The changes to Westminster politics in Scotland in 2015 are likely to be without historical precedent. In this post, James Dennison discusses the implications of these changes in the context of the “West Lothian” question. He argues that the election of a large number of SNP MPs is likely to greatly exacerbate tensions that were previously dormant, and could […]

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    The UK election spells the end for the biggest ‘law’ in political science

The UK election spells the end for the biggest ‘law’ in political science

Voters are again looking beyond the traditional two-party system and look set to put paid to a famous proposition of political science, ‘Duverger’s Law’, writes Patrick Dunleavy.

Every election held under “first past the post” (FPTP) voting in the USA produces perfect two-party outcomes – no party except the Democrats and Republicans gets a look-in. Yet elections held under the same […]