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#LSEGE19 Liveblog

Welcome to the LSE British Politics blog. Reporting live from the LSE’s Election Night, we will be running analyses and commentary by academics and other experts throughout the evening.

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    Optimism does go viral: Labour, the Conservatives, and social media in the 2017 general election

Optimism does go viral: Labour, the Conservatives, and social media in the 2017 general election

Analysing the social media strategies of Labour and the Conservatives during the 2017 general election, Paolo Gerbaudo explains that the latter focused on negative issues such as Brexit and terrorism, while Labour focused on positive ones, such as the promise of higher social spending, generating higher levels of engagement.

Social media are widely held to have played an important role in […]

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    Johnson’s defence of war metaphors and blame of all sides turns MPs into enemy targets

Johnson’s defence of war metaphors and blame of all sides turns MPs into enemy targets

When the Prime Minister endorses the violence of war to refer to parliamentary politics, he aligns himself with a tradition of thinking for which those with whom we disagree are not just adversaries to engage with, but enemy targets to be destroyed, writes Lea Ypi.

‘Tempers on both sides have become inflamed’, Boris Johnson declared recently while refusing to apologise […]

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    Brexit and parliamentary legitimation: beyond constitutional minutiae

Brexit and parliamentary legitimation: beyond constitutional minutiae

David Judge writes that, while much of the discussion around Brexit and Parliament is about procedure and conventions, it should also be about the bigger picture: what does Brexit tell us about the fundamental principles of the UK’s parliamentary state and representative democracy?

Politicians and the punditocracy have become consumed with the minutiae of parliamentary procedure and constitutional conventions – […]

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    Reading political tea leaves: a new forecasting model for British general elections

Reading political tea leaves: a new forecasting model for British general elections

Political polling has faced difficulties during recent elections. Drawing on methods used for US elections and elsewhere, Philippe Mongrain  proposes a new forecasting model, which takes into account the state of the economy, the cost of ruling for the incumbent party, leadership approval ratings and previous election results, and offers some improvements on existing polls for forecasting the vote […]

March 16th, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Merry Christmas!

December 25th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments|
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    The Supreme Court’s decision on Northern Ireland’s abortion law – what now?

The Supreme Court’s decision on Northern Ireland’s abortion law – what now?

Kathryn McNeilly, Fiona Bloomer, and Claire Pierson explain the background and implications of the recent ruling which, although found Northern Ireland’s abortion law to be incompatible with human rights law, dismissed the case on technical grounds.

In recent weeks abortion has been a highly topical issue in Ireland, north and south. Following the referendum decision in the Republic of Ireland […]

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    If properly supported, local partnerships could help tackle radicalisation in UK communities

If properly supported, local partnerships could help tackle radicalisation in UK communities

Local partnership working helps not only detect, but also tackle radicalisation in a joined up way. But are these partnerships properly resourced and co-ordinated? Sue Roberts explains why, despite being vital, local multi-agency partnerships are being hindered by their unclear role and austerity cuts.

After the Manchester, London Bridge, Borough Market and Finsbury Park terrorist attacks in 2017, politicians and […]