Screen time

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    Tablet totalitarianism – how an obsession with ‘screen time’ misses the point

Tablet totalitarianism – how an obsession with ‘screen time’ misses the point

With the start of the school year, backpacks will be filled with notes home to parents. Instead of the expected warnings about forgotten PE kits last year, though, one mother discovered a flyer from her child’s school exhorting parents to tell their kids to ‘PUT DOWN THAT TABLET!’ Concerned about the negative tone, and lack of balance, mum and […]

September 6th, 2017|Featured, On our minds|2 Comments|

Screen time for kids: Getting the balance right

Because it is #nationalplayday today, and children are out of school for summer holidays, we are discussing strategies for managing screen-time.  This post features an infographic created by Sonia Livingstone and Alicia Blum-Ross, together with the Connected Learning Alliance, which addresses more effective methods for parents than simply ‘watching the clock’.  Sonia is Professor of Social Psychology at LSE’s Department of Media […]

Seeking high-quality digital content for children in Turkey

What kind of digital content is available for children in Turkey? How are Turkish parents deciding rules about screen time and tablet use? What do children use tablets for? Burcu Izci and colleagues compare young children’s tablet use in Turkey and the US, and also the extent to which parents limit children’s access to tablet devices. Burcu Izci and […]

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    How dropping screen time rules can fuel extraordinary learning

How dropping screen time rules can fuel extraordinary learning

How can we focus on quality over quantity in the ongoing issue of screen time rules? In this post, Mimi Ito suggests practical ways to focus on quality screen engagement and to avoid stressing about counting time. With this perspective, Mimi’s research shows that extraordinary learning is possible when we allow young people to engage with the internet in […]

The trouble with ‘screen time rules’

How much is too much when it comes to ‘screen time’? Sonia Livingstone and Alicia Blum-Ross round-up the advice that is being given to parents about screen time rules, where reports represent advice on a scale from fear to hype. Rather than measuring screentime purely by the clock, Alicia and Sonia suggest a set of lifestyle-based questions that can help […]

Media activities in The Class

Sonia Livingstone, together with Julian Sefton-Green, followed a class of London teenagers for a year to find out more about how they are, or in some cases are not, connecting online. In this post, Sonia discusses the diverse patterns of media use and digital engagement that counter the common narrative of screens simply dominating teenagers’ lives. The book about this research project, The […]

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    Supporting and developing parents’ strategies for children’s use of digital media at home

Supporting and developing parents’ strategies for children’s use of digital media at home

Natalia Kucirkova explores the inherent difficulties in balancing children’s media use and concludes that there is no magic formula for a balanced media diet. Natalia is a Senior Research Fellow at the University College London. She researches innovative ways of supporting children’s reading engagement with digital books and the role of personalisation in early years. [Header image credit: M. Kwan, CC […]

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    What are the effects of touchscreens on toddler development?

What are the effects of touchscreens on toddler development?

Should you let your toddler use an iPad? Do we know how touchscreen devices affect infants and toddlers? Celeste Cheung is a postdoctoral researcher at Birkbeck University of London and works on the TABLET project, which investigate how 6- to 36-month olds use touchscreen devices, and how these may impact their brain, cognitive and social development. Celeste discusses how preliminary study findings […]

The peculiar joylessness of neuroparenting

Jan Macvarish interrogates the ‘new’ science of neuroparenting, and the idea that parents are the ‘architects’ of their babies’ brains and therefore of their future happiness and life chances. She argues that this assumption has a persistent cultural and political power, and explores the role of expert advice and parental instincts. Jan is a researcher and lecturer with the Centre for Parenting Culture Studies, […]

Follow the money

Martin Schmalzried, a Senior Policy and Advocacy Officer at the Confederation of Family Organisations in the European Union (COFACE), explores the power and control of private companies over internet access and usage. His piece follows a special workshop¹ convened by the Media Policy Project and Parenting for a Digital Future on ‘Families and “screen-time”: challenges of media self-regulation’ and the publication of a policy brief about families and […]

December 7th, 2016|Featured, On our minds|1 Comment|