Brexit

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    Denial, anger, and acceptance: moving to the next phase of the British far-right

Denial, anger, and acceptance: moving to the next phase of the British far-right

In spite of evidence of long-running and large latent support, we have been in a state of denial about the far-right in Britain, which has fed into the growth of UKIP, writes Helen Margetts. Here, she outlines the state of the far-right and argues that we need to move towards acceptance, be alert to signals in long-running trends, and […]

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    Return to the Commonwealth? UK-Africa trade after Brexit will not be straightforward

Return to the Commonwealth? UK-Africa trade after Brexit will not be straightforward

Calls for a post-Brexit return to the Commonwealth ignore the existing privileged EU-Africa trade relationship as well as the UK’s now diminished trade influence, argues Peg Murray-Evans.  

In a speech to the Institute of Chartered Engineers in February, David Davis MP – now Secretary of State for Exiting the EU – told the audience: ‘The only Commonwealth country to enjoy […]

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    Why applying for citizenship is an anxiety filled process – and not just for applicants

Why applying for citizenship is an anxiety filled process – and not just for applicants

As we consider what post-Brexit citizenship might look like, it is crucial to understand the pervasiveness of anxiety and its integral role in shaping policy processes. Here, Anne-Marie Fortier discusses how anxiety is attached especially to English language ability for applicants, whilst also highlighting the role it plays for those on the other side of the process: the registrars checking applications  for citizenship or settlement.

Writing for The Guardian, […]

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    A tale of two countries: Brexit and the ‘left behind’ thesis

A tale of two countries: Brexit and the ‘left behind’ thesis

Why did Britain vote for Brexit? What was the relative importance of social class, age, and immigration? And to what extent did the vote for Brexit map on to past campaigns by Ukip? Matthew Goodwin and Oliver Heath use aggregate-level data to analyse the Brexit vote in a paper forthcoming in Political Quarterly. They summarise the findings.

The referendum result is now […]

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    David Davis has demonstrated a decidedly muddled understanding of trade policy

David Davis has demonstrated a decidedly muddled understanding of trade policy

One of the arguments made by the Leave campaign during the UK’s referendum was that Brexit would allow Britain to negotiate trade deals globally more quickly than would be possible via the EU. Mark Manger writes that the plans outlined so far by David Davis, the UK’s new ‘Brexit Secretary’, indicate this is likely to be a key priority […]

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    ‘Back to the Future?’ Brexit, elitism, and the British Political Tradition

‘Back to the Future?’ Brexit, elitism, and the British Political Tradition

Following the referendum, British politics is about to enter into a process of de-Europeanisation. Danny Fitzpatrick and Dave Richards warn that Brexit – an outcome unanticipated and perhaps even unwanted by many on the Leave campaign – should not be used as a justification for preserving the elitism that has characterised the British Political Tradition.

With a record national turnout […]

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    Using EU citizens as bargaining chips is wrong, problematic – and possibly illegal

Using EU citizens as bargaining chips is wrong, problematic – and possibly illegal

The government’s unwillingness to guarantee the status of EU citizens living in the UK following the Brexit vote may be violating the European Convention on Human Rights, argues Virginia Mantouvalou. (And regardless of what misleading Leave leaflets claimed, UK obligations under the Convention were not being decided by the referendum.)

Days after the Brexit vote, Theresa May stated that she […]

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    The ultimate causes of Brexit: history, culture, and geography

The ultimate causes of Brexit: history, culture, and geography

Xenophobia, austerity, and dissatisfaction with politics may have contributed to the Brexit vote. But James Dennison and Noah Carl write that, although a number of concerns may have tipped the balance, Brexit was ultimately decided by more than recent events. Here, they demonstrate how the UK has been the least well-integrated EU member state, and so the closer the EU […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.