Brexit

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    Brexit means Brexit – but the Norway model is clearly the least worst option

Brexit means Brexit – but the Norway model is clearly the least worst option

There has been no formal statement by Theresa May’s government on when Article 50, which initiates the process for the UK leaving the EU, will be triggered. Gavin Barrett argues that although delaying the process will prolong market uncertainty, the new Prime Minister may be wise to hold off until early 2017 as once Article 50 is invoked much […]

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    How Leave won Twitter: an analysis of 7.5m Brexit-related tweets

How Leave won Twitter: an analysis of 7.5m Brexit-related tweets

How do tweets map onto the Brexit vote? Neatly, it turns out.  Stefan Bauchowitz and Max Hänska collected more than 7.5 million Brexit-related tweets in the run-up to the referendum. They found Leavers were more active than supporters of Remain, despite the younger profile of social media users.

How did Eurosceptic (Leave) and pro-European (Remain) activity compare on social media […]

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    Brexit, Whitehall, and the demise of Haldane: the need for a new minister-civil servant relationship?

Brexit, Whitehall, and the demise of Haldane: the need for a new minister-civil servant relationship?

Brexit poses significant challenges to Whitehall, and raises questions about whether the Civil Service is up to the task of negotiating a new settlement for Britain’s place in the world, write Dave Richards and Martin Smith. Outlining the development of Whitehall reforms, they explain why a very different ministerial-civil service relationship is needed, as well as an overhaul of […]

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    Is the EU in danger of collapse? Brexit and the tragedy of Europe

Is the EU in danger of collapse? Brexit and the tragedy of Europe

Following the UK’s vote to leave the EU, Miguel Angel Lara Otaola writes that the decision represents a key challenge for Europe’s post-war system of open markets, cooperation between nations, stability, and peace. He argues that both the UK and the rest of the EU will need to be constructive in their negotiations if they are to avoid aggravating […]

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    Why Brexit negotiations must focus on politics rather than personalities

Why Brexit negotiations must focus on politics rather than personalities

Theresa May has visited a number of European leaders since taking office as UK Prime Minister. Richard Rose writes that while these early diplomatic forays are undoubtedly useful, it is likely that several of the heads of government she has met will no longer be in power when the UK’s Brexit negotiations reach a climax.

In less than a month […]

What does ‘Brexit means Brexit’ actually mean?

Theresa May has famously stated that ‘Brexit means Brexit’, but what does this actually mean (if anything)? Sionaidh Douglas-Scott examines the legal implications of triggering Article 50. The position of referendums in UK constitutional law is very hazy, and previous UK-EU negotiations on crucial matters have often been shrouded in secrecy. Paradoxically, Brexit may therefore not mean ‘taking back […]

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    Negotiations and more negotiations: Six Brexit deals that Theresa May must strike

Negotiations and more negotiations: Six Brexit deals that Theresa May must strike

Negotiations and more negotiations, year after year. That will be the main business of Theresa May’s government for the foreseeable future, argues Charles Grant. Britain’s exit from the EU will require at least six interlocking sets of negotiations, and they will take much longer and be far more complicated than most British politicians realise.

One negotiation will cover Britain’s exit […]

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    Wales and the Brexit vote: a case of turkeys voting for Christmas?

Wales and the Brexit vote: a case of turkeys voting for Christmas?

Wales voted leave by a margin of 52.5 per cent. It is an interesting case study of how people voted against their own material self interest, to increase their precarity, and to become even poorer than they already are, writes Daniel Evans. Before the referendum, he also predicted that that the EU could become a scapegoat for Wales’ massively alienated populace […]

August 4th, 2016|Brexit, Featured|2 Comments|
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.