Department Alumni

Globalisation in 2021

Globalisation is related to the disappearance of national boundaries to establish a single market. This refers to goods and services, capital, as well as labour. The current wave of globalisation started with the end of the Second World War and the establishment of international institutions fostering the decline in trade tariffs, which gained speed in the 1980s and 1990s […]

Informal economy avocados

MSc Development Management alum, Alejandra Padin-Dujon considers the implications of formalisation of informal sectors when buying her avocados from a vendor versus a budget supermarket in Antigua. 

Welcome to Antigua! Here’s a hypothetical scenario:

You walk through the market in town and happen across a vendor selling avocados. They are EC$10 each – no cheaper or more expensive than they would be at […]

Where has the world made progress in HIV Policy?

Much progress on HIV has been made – and the science has never been better – but the world lags behind in translating the advancements of science into law and policy. LSE Alum, Renu Singh argues that closing the science-policy gap is key to combatting HIV/AIDS for the purpose of bringing best practices to scale and improving health, and shows […]

Reconciling catch-up industrialisation with de-growth

In this article, LSE ID alum Tobias Wuttke argues that a fundamental debate in development studies must be about reconciling catch-up industrialisation with the insights of de-growth and ecological economics. Wuttke builds on his argument from a previous article where he questions the viability of de-growth as a concept in light of the climate crisis. 

It is time to move away from simple claims like […]

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    Improved governance in emerging markets – the case of China

Improved governance in emerging markets – the case of China

The link between economic performance and institutions is significant. Research points to the fact that the question is not anymore whether institutions are important but which institutions to focus on, as well as how to develop these. An improvement in the quality of institutions can lead to a substantial growth spurt. One important aspect with respect to institutions is […]

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    Common challenges faced by agriculture in India and the UK, and new opportunities for greener practices

Common challenges faced by agriculture in India and the UK, and new opportunities for greener practices

Recent agricultural policy reforms in India and the UK have highlighted a fundamental paradox: food is the most important good produced in the world, yet those who produce it struggle to earn a living without government subsidies, or by damaging the environment. LSE ID alum, Suhrid Patel questions whether the new UK policy could represent a new approach to support farmers to earn […]

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    Jerry Rawlings is dead, but he still looms large in Ghanaian politics

Jerry Rawlings is dead, but he still looms large in Ghanaian politics

LSE International Development alum and freelance writer, Noble Kofi Nazzah looks at the life and legacy of Jerry Rawlings, Ghana’s former President and founder of the National Democratic Congress (NDC). 

This piece was first published on Foreignpolicy.com.

Ask any Ghanaian to guess which political party I am likely to support and they will, without mincing words, tell you the National Democratic […]

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    Experiences of business case sustainability initiatives in Bangladesh’s garment industry

Experiences of business case sustainability initiatives in Bangladesh’s garment industry

Manufacturing processes often take place using practices that create harm to people and the planet. Dr Chikako Oka, Dr Rachel Alexander and Professor Shahidur Rahman explore challenges of sustainability-focused training programmes that global brands and retailers have been promoting for their suppliers by considering the perspectives of garment sector factory managers in Bangladesh. 

Social and environmental sustainability challenges are a major concern in […]

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    Excluding the Excluded: What India’s refugee ‘law’ means for the Rohingyas

Excluding the Excluded: What India’s refugee ‘law’ means for the Rohingyas

Following the Rohingya Genocide Remembrance Day, the Government of India’s refugee policy, albeit non-existent, also remains largely exclusionary against the world’s most persecuted minority. Debanjana Paul and Vidushi Mehrotra explore legislative roadblocks, its translation into ad-hoc maltreatment of the Rohingyas and call for inclusive policy action to better support Rohingya asylum-seekers.

While approximately 40,000 Rohingyas are spread across six locations in India, […]

  • Permalink WFP Accelerator

photographed on May 16, 2019 in Munich.

Foto und Copyright: Joerg Koch/ WFP
joerg@joergkochfoto.de;
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    We need to tell our own story: working as a Black humanitarian

We need to tell our own story: working as a Black humanitarian

Working as a Black professional within international development, Susan Sebatindira felt frustrated by the level of underrepresentation of Black people and People of Colour across the sector. She felt passionately about the importance in having a community that they could connect with, and showcase the work and realities of what it means to be Black development practitioner. Susan tells us about her […]