Venezuela

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    Necesitamos comprender la Responsabilidad de Proteger antes de hacer un (mal) uso de ella en Venezuela

Necesitamos comprender la Responsabilidad de Proteger antes de hacer un (mal) uso de ella en Venezuela

El principio de la Responsabilidad de Proteger, respaldado por unanimidad por las Naciones Unidas en 2005, es un componente importante de un sistema de seguridad colectivo global, pero invocarlo de manera incorrecta no ayudará a las víctimas para quienes fue diseñado. Por Adrian Gallagher (Centro Europeo para la Responsabilidad de Proteger, Universidad de Leeds).

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    We need to understand the Responsibility to Protect before we (mis)apply it in Venezuela

We need to understand the Responsibility to Protect before we (mis)apply it in Venezuela

The principle of the Responsibility to Protect, endorsed unanimously by the United Nations in 2005, is an important component of a global, collective security system. But invoking it inaccurately will do little to help the victims that is was designed to protect, writes Adrian Gallagher (European Centre for the Responsibility to Protect, University of Leeds).

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    Misjudging the military: Guaidó, Trump, and the long shadow of Venezuela’s civil-military alliance

Misjudging the military: Guaidó, Trump, and the long shadow of Venezuela’s civil-military alliance

The lack of major defections from Venezuela’s armed forces reflects both the power and the perversion of their anti-imperial, developmental, and pro-social role under Hugo Chávez, writes Asa Cusack (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre). • n.b. republished courtesy of Al Jazeera; Creative Commons licence does not apply

Who is to blame for polarisation in Venezuela? 

While academic research recognises a number of potential drivers of Venezuela’s social and political polarisation, major English-language newspapers tend to depict Chavismo alone as responsible for tearing apart a supposedly peaceful and united nation, writes Alan MacLeod (Glasgow University Media Group).

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    Big in 2018: our most popular articles in a turbulent year for Latin America and the Caribbean

Big in 2018: our most popular articles in a turbulent year for Latin America and the Caribbean

Taking a look at ten of our of most popular blogs from 2018, it’s clear that it has been a year of major upheaval in the region. Key issues have been the diverging populisms of AMLO’s Mexico and Bolsonaro’s Brazil, the crumbling of two-party politics in El Salvador, and the ongoing crisis in Venezuela.

But wider trends have also persisted, as reflected in China’s growing […]

January 2nd, 2019|Featured|0 Comments|
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    Brazil elections 2018: how will Bolsonaro’s victory affect migration policy in Brazil and South America?

Brazil elections 2018: how will Bolsonaro’s victory affect migration policy in Brazil and South America?

Jair Bolsonaro’s victory in Brazil’s 2018 presidential election could lead to a more severe migration policy, attacks on migrants’ rights, and fragmentation of regional approaches to mobility, write Marcia Vera Espinoza (Queen Mary University of London) and Leiza Brumat (European University Institute).

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    Understanding patterns of protest against Cuba’s medical internationalism

Understanding patterns of protest against Cuba’s medical internationalism

The presence of Cuban healthcare professionals in countries like Brazil, Bolivia, and Haiti has followed a clear path from protest to acceptance, but the case Venezuela shows the vital importance of political neutrality, write Emily J. Kirk (Dalhousie University), Chris Walker (St Mary’s University), and Arturo Méndez (University of Camagüey).

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    The Venezuelan exodus: placing Latin America in the global conversation on migration management

The Venezuelan exodus: placing Latin America in the global conversation on migration management

Though Venezuelan emigration has passed through phases like those of the European migration crisis, issues of foreign policy have seen Latin America respond quite differently to large-scale migration, write Nicolas Parent and Luisa Feline Freier (Universidad del Pacífico, Peru).

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    Is socialism to blame for Venezuela’s never-ending crisis?

Is socialism to blame for Venezuela’s never-ending crisis?

Though ’21st-century socialism’ is implicated in Venezuela’s collapse, so too are many characteristics of the country’s context, capitalism, and culture, writes Asa Cusack (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre). • n.b. republished courtesy of Al Jazeera; Creative Commons licence does not apply

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    Venezuela elections 2018: evaluating electoral conditions in an authoritarian regime

Venezuela elections 2018: evaluating electoral conditions in an authoritarian regime

Participating in elections under authoritarian regimes can reap rewards, but electoral conditions in Venezuela have degenerated so drastically that a Maduro victory in 2018 could not be considered democratic, write Griselda Colina (Observatorio Global de Comunicación y Democracia) and Jennifer McCoy (Georgia State University).