Non-formal learning

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    Supervising, cheerleading, babysitting and collaborating: parents as co-learners in makerspaces

Supervising, cheerleading, babysitting and collaborating: parents as co-learners in makerspaces

In the first of four posts presenting findings from the Makerspaces in the early years (MakEY) final report, Sonia Livingstone, Alicia Blum-Ross, and Paige Mustain outline the key roles that parents adopt when accompanying their children to makerspaces. Sonia Livingstone is Professor of Social Psychology at LSE’s Department of Media and Communications and is the lead investigator of the Parenting for a Digital Future research project. Alicia Blum-Ross is […]

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    Kids on Earth: Travelling the world to understand the 21st century

Kids on Earth: Travelling the world to understand the 21st century

In this post, Howard Blumenthal discusses his new project Kids on Earth, which is an online collection of more than 500 videos of children from around the world talking about how technology has shaped their learning and plans for the future. Howard Blumenthal is a visiting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania. Howard created and produced PBS’s Peabody and Emmy Award winning series […]

Supporting your child online – pointers for parents

Non-formal learning within the home plays a major role in children developing advanced digital skills. In this post Peter Twining discusses which practices adopted by ‘digitally connected families’ are the most successful. Professor of Education (Futures) at The Open University, Peter Twining, is passionate about developing education systems that are fit for our rapidly changing world. Much of his research has focused on […]

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    Young children and the use of digital technology across Europe

Young children and the use of digital technology across Europe

Children are often more digitally skilled than parents realise and learn both from observing other family members and from developing their own strategies. Yet parental attitudes still deeply influence children’s levels of digital literacy and parents tend to have a more positive view of digital technology if schools meaningfully integrate such technologies into children’s learning. These are some of […]

Parenting for a Digital Future July 2018 roundup

With summer holidays on the horizon, here’s our roundup of recent posts from the Parenting for a Digital Future blog. [Header image credit: P. Morris, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0]

Privacy, safety and rights online

With the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) coming into force at the end of May, we asked how this will impact on children’s privacy and right to participate online, […]

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    New videos on Parenting for a Digital Future’s YouTube channel

New videos on Parenting for a Digital Future’s YouTube channel

Parenting for a Digital Future’s YouTube channel showcases some of our latest research findings and we have recently posted four new videos on the following topics. [Header image credit: N. Cavallotto, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.jpg]

Parenting for a Digital Future Survey Report 1

Three short clips neatly summarise Parenting for a Digital Future’s Survey Report 1 “In the digital home, how do parents […]

July 13th, 2018|Featured, Our publications|Comments Off on New videos on Parenting for a Digital Future’s YouTube channel|
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    ‘I’m not just a mom’: Parents as creators, collaborators and learners in creative computing

‘I’m not just a mom’: Parents as creators, collaborators and learners in creative computing

Family Creative Learning was designed to support intergenerational interactions in the context of computing, and this post explores the technological and the creative possibilities for families learning together. Ricarose Roque discusses the programme and the series of workshops hosted at a local community centre, where parents and children engaged with the Scratch programming language and the Makey Makey invention kit. One […]

December 6th, 2017|Featured, Reflections|1 Comment|

The Internet of Toys: Implications of increased connectivity and convergence of physical and digital play in young children

How are children’s play objects shaped by technological inventions? As toys become increasingly connected online, Bieke Zaman, Donell Holloway and Leila Green research the ‘Internet of Toys’. The the data they report in this post show that parents generally welcome these changes because they offer new ways of playing, learning, and the possibility of extreme personalization. Bieke Zaman is associated with mintlab and researches how […]

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    ‘Pop-ups and pull-outs: How digital books offer children an experience of ‘materiality’

‘Pop-ups and pull-outs: How digital books offer children an experience of ‘materiality’

How have digital books changed the reading experience for children? As summertime is a prime season for parents to read to, or read with their children, in this post Natalia Kucirkova outlines the factors that affect ‘reading for pleasure’ in the context of digital books. Natalia argues that digital books have reinvigorated interest in the ‘materiality’ of children’s reading, […]

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    A learning life: How connected learning might work over time

A learning life: How connected learning might work over time

Julian Sefton-Green discusses one case from his book Learning Identities, Education and Community: young lives in the cosmopolitan city. This research looked at the way individuals in Norway constructed narratives about themselves and their educational choices. He picks up from his previous post on the DML Central blog, From ‘Connected Learning’ to ‘Learning Lives’, where he explains the importance of […]