Michael Latner

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    The Supreme Court’s partisan gerrymandering decision is Justice Scalia’s last laugh. Democratic restoration now depends on the people alone. 

The Supreme Court’s partisan gerrymandering decision is Justice Scalia’s last laugh. Democratic restoration now depends on the people alone. 

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This week the United States Supreme Court determined that reviewing partisan gerrymandering cases was outside the remit of federal courts. Alex Keena, Michael Latner, Anthony J. McGann and Charles Anthony Smith argue that in failing to recognize the vote dilution caused by gerrymandering, as well as connecting the majority rule standard to the Fourteenth Amendment, the decision removes Americans’ fundamental right to participate equally in the […]

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    The 2018 House elections may be historic enough to end the redistricting wars

The 2018 House elections may be historic enough to end the redistricting wars

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This year’s midterm elections saw reforms to the way US House districts are drawn in four states. Alongside these successful measures, write Alex Keena, Michael Latner, Anthony J. McGann and Charles Anthony Smith, Democratic takeovers of gubernatorial mansions and successful voting rights reforms such as Florida’s felon re-enfranchisement are likely to signal the beginning of an era of significant […]

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    In its latest decision, the Supreme Court has got it wrong when it says that partisan gerrymandering only hurts voters in specific districts

In its latest decision, the Supreme Court has got it wrong when it says that partisan gerrymandering only hurts voters in specific districts

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Last week, the US Supreme Court sent gerrymandering cases from Wisconsin, Maryland and North Carolina back to their respective states’ courts, with the unanimous opinion that state political parties could not prove that they were harmed by the gerrymandering of individual legislative districts. Alex Keena, Michael Latner, Anthony J. McGann and Charles Anthony Smith argue that the Supreme Court […]

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    Maryland’s electoral maps show how proportional representation could solve the problem of gerrymandering

Maryland’s electoral maps show how proportional representation could solve the problem of gerrymandering

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This week the US Supreme Court hears a case concerning the constitutionality of partisan gerrymandering in Maryland. Examining current, past, and alternative electoral maps, Alex Keena, Michael Latner, Anthony J. McGann, and Charles Anthony Smith find that by making districts more competitive, some redistricting plans can actually work against one party or the other. Only the introduction of proportional representation […]

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    The Supreme Court’s quiet gerrymandering revolution and the road to minority rule

The Supreme Court’s quiet gerrymandering revolution and the road to minority rule

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This month the US Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a Wisconsin case over the constitutionality of the Republican-dominated state legislature’s redistricting plan. Michael Latner, Anthony McGann, Charles Anthony Smith, and Alex Keena argue that while this case is important, no matter what it decides, the Supreme Court has already enabled large-scale gerrymandering. They write that the Court’s 2004 […]

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    Gerrymandering the Presidency: Why Trump could lose the popular vote in 2020 by 6 percent and still win a second term.

Gerrymandering the Presidency: Why Trump could lose the popular vote in 2020 by 6 percent and still win a second term.

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Donald Trump was the clear Electoral College winner in the 2016 election, despite losing the popular vote by a wide margin to Hillary Clinton. Anthony J. McGann, Charles Anthony Smith, Michael Latner and Alex Keena write that, unless the Supreme Court stops congressional gerrymandering, President Trump can guarantee re-election in 2020 – even if he loses by 6 percent.

When the […]

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    Why the Republicans will retain the House in 2016…and 2018…and 2020.

Why the Republicans will retain the House in 2016…and 2018…and 2020.

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At this stage of the 2016 election cycle, which party will control the White House and the US Senate come January 2017 seems to be very much up in the air. The US House of Representatives on the other hand, is almost certain to remain in the hands of the Republican Party, a situation which is likely to continue […]

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