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    Avoiding a nuclear meltdown: How we might resolve the Euratom question

Avoiding a nuclear meltdown: How we might resolve the Euratom question

David Davis has stated that although there is no ‘systematic impact assessment’ of Britain leaving the European Union, the UK government has produced a ‘sectoral analysis’ of several industries. Joshua McMullan writes that one sector where it would be wise to examine the impact of leaving without any negotiated arrangement would be the nuclear power industry as the UK leaves Euratom. […]

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    The macroeconomic consensus underpinning EMU is shifting. Could it pave the way for a completion of the Eurozone?

The macroeconomic consensus underpinning EMU is shifting. Could it pave the way for a completion of the Eurozone?

The Eurozone crisis prompted many observers to conclude that the Eurozone requires a banking and fiscal union to be considered ‘complete’. But realising these aims remains politically difficult and it is far from clear how agreement can be reached on the way forward. Sebastian Diessner argues that 2017 has seen the first signs of a potential consensus emerging based […]

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    Understanding Spain’s decision to revoke the European Arrest Warrant for Carles Puigdemont

Understanding Spain’s decision to revoke the European Arrest Warrant for Carles Puigdemont

With Catalan elections scheduled for 21 December, the fate of Carles Puigdemont, who fled to Belgium in October, has taken on added significance. The latest twist in the case came on 5 December, when the Spanish authorities revoked a European Arrest Warrant for Puigdemont, amid suggestions he was intending to voluntarily return to Spain. Auke Willems explains the most […]

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    The question of citizenship in the Brexit divorce: UK and EU citizens’ rights compared

The question of citizenship in the Brexit divorce: UK and EU citizens’ rights compared

The rights afforded to EU citizens living in the UK, and UK citizens living in the EU, is one of the key topics in the Brexit negotiations. But what do UK citizens think about these issues? Presenting evidence from a comprehensive survey of British views toward EU free movement rights, Liisa Talving and Sofia Vasilopoulou illustrate that although the […]

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    Book Review: Ethnic Mobilization, Violence and the Politics of Affect: The Serb Democratic Party and the Bosnian War by Adis Maksić

Book Review: Ethnic Mobilization, Violence and the Politics of Affect: The Serb Democratic Party and the Bosnian War by Adis Maksić

In Ethnic Mobilization, Violence and the Politics of Affect: The Serb Democratic Party and the Bosnian War, Adis Maksić offers a comprehensive and insightful account of the processes through which Bosnian Serbs became ethnically mobilised around the Serb Democratic Party. Sarah Correia finds this to be an essential book for anyone studying the Bosnian war, the dynamics of ethnic conflict and nation formation.
Ethnic […]

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    Britain’s insistence on impact assessments helped wrap Brussels in red tape

Britain’s insistence on impact assessments helped wrap Brussels in red tape

The much-anticipated Brexit impact assessments are rather less detailed than many expected them to be. Chris Kendall contrasts the Brexit secretary’s admission that he is ‘not a fan’ of them with the stringent approach the European Commission now takes to financial accountability. Indeed, it was the UK’s insistence on thorough impact assessments that helped to create a culture of propriety in Brussels. 

On […]

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    The WTO and plurilateralism: What lessons can we draw from the EU’s experience with ‘differentiated integration’?

The WTO and plurilateralism: What lessons can we draw from the EU’s experience with ‘differentiated integration’?

The World Trade Organization will hold a ministerial conference in Buenos Aires from 10-13 December. One of the key topics on the agenda will be the nature of WTO negotiations and whether the WTO should make greater use of so called ‘plurilateral agreements’ which involve some, but not all WTO members. Robert Basedow writes that the WTO could learn […]

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    May’s Irish dilemma is a precursor of even more intractable dilemmas of Brexit to come

May’s Irish dilemma is a precursor of even more intractable dilemmas of Brexit to come

Those who wished the UK to leave the EU fell into two quite different camps: those who wanted Brexit to mark a decisive break in the economic and social life of the United Kingdom; and those who wanted Brexit to take place with minimal social and economic disruption. Brendan Donnelly argues that this division is at the heart of the […]

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    Should we prosecute political leaders after a crisis? Lessons from Iceland

Should we prosecute political leaders after a crisis? Lessons from Iceland

At the end of November, the European Court of Human Rights ruled that the conviction of former Icelandic prime minister Geir Haarde over his handling of the country’s financial crisis was fair. Ragnar Hjalmarsson and Iosif Kovras examine whether political leaders should face criminal proceedings following a crisis, and what the potential pitfalls are for democracy.

Former Icelandic Prime Minister […]

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    The pitfalls of pursuing economic resilience in the Eurozone

The pitfalls of pursuing economic resilience in the Eurozone

With the fallout from the Eurozone crisis still fresh in the minds of European leaders, several figures have emphasised the need to make Eurozone economies more ‘resilient’ to future economic shocks. But what does this mean in practice? Sotiria Theodoropoulou writes that focusing on economic resilience may offer a way forward for future reforms, but there is a danger […]

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    Why the Republic and Northern Ireland need shared regulatory frameworks

Why the Republic and Northern Ireland need shared regulatory frameworks

On 4 December, the UK and the EU failed to reach an agreement to move on to the next stage of the Brexit talks, with reports suggesting the Democratic Unionist Party had refused to accept proposed concessions on the Irish border. Anand Menon explains why there are strong reasons for shared regulatory frameworks on both sides of the Irish […]

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    A fourth pillar for Europe’s banking union? The case for a pan-European asset management company in the Eurozone

A fourth pillar for Europe’s banking union? The case for a pan-European asset management company in the Eurozone

Although progress has been made in establishing a European banking union, the large stock of non-performing loans in the Eurozone banking sector still presents a major problem. Helen Louri writes that in addition to the ‘three pillars’ of the banking union that are already on the table – the Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM), Single Resolution Mechanism, and a European […]

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    Book Review: Diploma Democracy: The Rise of Political Meritocracy by Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille

Book Review: Diploma Democracy: The Rise of Political Meritocracy by Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille

In Diploma Democracy: The Rise of Political Meritocracy, Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille examine how Western democracies are shaped by educational inequalities that lead to gaps in political participation and governments being dominated by academic elites. While less sure of some of the authors’ solutions for these ‘diploma democracies’, Jameel Hampton finds the book to be a convincing account of the influence of education on political […]

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December 3rd, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
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    Expect a backlash if the £50bn offer doesn’t move the Brexit negotiations on

Expect a backlash if the £50bn offer doesn’t move the Brexit negotiations on

After threatening to pay nothing to the EU, then conceding £20bn, the UK government has finally indicated it will pay a Brexit ‘divorce bill’ of £40-50bn. The initial reaction from Eurosceptics has been rather muted, writes Iain Begg. But if the European Council does not allow exit negotiations to move to the next stage, we can expect a serious backlash […]

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Another grand coalition awaits a fractured Germany

The CDU/CSU and the SPD are set to discuss the possibility of renewing their grand coalition in Germany, following the breakdown of negotiations between the CDU/CSU, Greens and the FDP. Rakib Ehsan assesses the dilemma facing the SPD as it considers joining another government. He argues that the party sorely needs a period in opposition to try and resolve […]

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    How EU law came to the fore in the Catalan independence debate – and what it means for Carles Puigdemont

How EU law came to the fore in the Catalan independence debate – and what it means for Carles Puigdemont

The Catalan independence movement has made repeated calls for EU actors to take a role in resolving the crisis that followed the independence referendum in October, but until now the response from EU leaders has largely been that the situation is an internal one to be dealt with in Spain. Auke Willems writes that despite the EU’s intention to […]

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    The future of EU trade negotiations: What has been learned from CETA and TTIP?

The future of EU trade negotiations: What has been learned from CETA and TTIP?

What lessons have been drawn by the EU from the CETA and TTIP trade negotiations? Johan Adriaensen argues that the trade package contained in Jean-Claude Juncker’s State of the Union speech presented a coherent vision for how EU trade negotiations could move forward, with avenues for discontent at future agreements to be channelled through representative institutions. However, implementing these […]

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    Can Donald Tusk save Poland’s weak and divided opposition? 

Can Donald Tusk save Poland’s weak and divided opposition? 

A scathing Twitter attack on the Polish government has fuelled speculation that European Council President, Donald Tusk, is planning a return to Polish politics to head up the country’s struggling opposition. Aleks Szczerbiak writes that although he remains a dangerous opponent for the ruling party, making a successful comeback would be a long and arduous process, and pinning its […]

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    Is Romania at risk of backsliding over corruption and the rule of law?

Is Romania at risk of backsliding over corruption and the rule of law?

When Romania joined the European Union in 2007, a ‘Cooperation and Verification Mechanism’ was established to assess the country’s progress in implementing judicial reforms and anti-corruption measures. However, the latest report published on 15 November raised concerns over potential backsliding, particularly in the area of judicial independence. Corina Lacatus assesses how Romania can respond to the concerns raised in […]

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    Book Review: The Global Rise of Populism: Performance, Political Style and Representation by Benjamin Moffitt

Book Review: The Global Rise of Populism: Performance, Political Style and Representation by Benjamin Moffitt

In The Global Rise of Populism: Performance, Political Style and Representation, Benjamin Moffitt approaches populism as a political style that is mediated through symbols, disseminated through the mass media and performed through verbal and non-verbal modes of communication. While suggesting Moffitt’s work is more an extension of the discourse school than a radical break from it, Ben Margulies welcomes this as an important contribution […]

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November 26th, 2017|featured|0 Comments|