Blog Team

About Blog Team

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Blog Team has created 2295 entries.
  • Permalink Gallery

    How the electoral success of radical right parties normalises public expressions of support for them

How the electoral success of radical right parties normalises public expressions of support for them

Support for radical right parties is often assumed to carry a degree of social stigma, which means that individuals are likely to privately support them but refrain from stating such support to others. But does this hold true once a party enters a national parliament? Drawing on a new study, Vicente Valentim illustrates that once a radical right party […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Mapping the conflict between EU member states over reform of the Eurozone

Mapping the conflict between EU member states over reform of the Eurozone

The Eurozone crisis prompted extensive reform efforts, but what kind of conflict existed among EU member states during the negotiations of these reforms? Using newly collected data on member states’ positions during the negotiations, Fabio Wasserfallen and Thomas Lehner show that states were divided along one distinct conflict structure: the conflict between advocates of fiscal transfer versus fiscal discipline. […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Mapping Society: The Spatial Dimensions of Social Cartography by Laura Vaughan

Book Review: Mapping Society: The Spatial Dimensions of Social Cartography by Laura Vaughan

In Mapping Society: The Spatial Dimensions of Social Cartography – available to download here for free – Laura Vaughan offers an analysis of how maps have both described and shaped social phenomena. This is a scholarly and thoroughly researched book that unpicks the context behind many of the foremost examples of social cartography, finds Inderbir Bhullar, and reveals how the layout of cities can exacerbate or ameliorate social ills.
Mapping […]

Share

An assassination in Poland: Charity and political hate

On 13 January, Paweł Adamowicz, the Mayor of Gdańsk, was fatally stabbed during a charity event. Helena Chmielewska-Szlajfer writes that while the attacker reportedly had a history of mental illness, the reaction to the murder has uncovered deep political divisions that now exist in Polish society.

Paweł Adamowicz, the Mayor of Gdańsk, was fatally stabbed on Sunday while standing on […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    New tricks for an old hand: Getting Brexit through Parliament

New tricks for an old hand: Getting Brexit through Parliament

Theresa May’s government won a confidence vote on Wednesday, 24 hours after the Prime Minister’s plan for Brexit was rejected. Benjamin Martill and Leo von Bülow-Quirk argue that amidst the confusion that now hangs over the process, there are three avenues available: to make piecemeal modifications to the initial Brexit agreement in the hope of winning parliamentary support, to […]

Share

The slow death of Hungarian popular sovereignty

Hungary’s Prime Minister, Viktor Orbán, is often accused of promoting a form of ‘illiberal democracy’, where governance is rooted in the popular support of a majority of the country’s citizens, but without a strong guarantee of minority rights and the rule of law. Lise Esther Herman argues that this criticism, which has been put forward by many of Orbán’s […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Strengthening the rule of law in the Western Balkans: Why should the EU care?

Strengthening the rule of law in the Western Balkans: Why should the EU care?

One of the main conditions set by the EU for aspiring members in the Western Balkans is to strengthen the rule of law, but the success of these efforts has so far been relatively limited. Drawing on a new study, Tena Prelec explains some of the major challenges that exist in the region and outlines why promoting the rule […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How Karl Polanyi can help us understand the threat posed by populism

How Karl Polanyi can help us understand the threat posed by populism

Populist politicians frequently champion direct democracy, yet other actors view populists as a threat to the democratic system. Ben Margulies draws on the work of Karl Polanyi in attempting to resolve this contradiction. He explains that populists typically believe democracy should be a vehicle for the people’s will, but crucially the people may never have the chance to change […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Lost History of Liberalism: From Ancient Rome to the Twenty-First Century by Helena Rosenblatt

Book Review: The Lost History of Liberalism: From Ancient Rome to the Twenty-First Century by Helena Rosenblatt

In The Lost History of Liberalism: From Ancient Rome to the Twenty-First Century, Helena Rosenblatt gives an account of how the meanings of ‘liberalism’ have evolved through a world history of its uses from ancient Rome to the present day and also recovers some of its connotations that have been lost, discarded or eroded. This book challenges some of the assumptions held […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Breached or protected? The ‘principle’ of consent in Northern Ireland and the UK government’s Brexit proposals

Breached or protected? The ‘principle’ of consent in Northern Ireland and the UK government’s Brexit proposals

The UK government published a policy paper this week that attempts to counter unionist concerns about the Withdrawal Agreement and its potential impact on Northern Ireland’s place in the United Kingdom. Underpinning this paper is the government’s commitment to ‘maintain absolutely the principle of consent’. Katy Hayward and David Phinnemore explain the origins and significance of this concept in the contemporary politics of […]

Share

The gilets jaunes: The good, the bad and the ugly

The gilets jaunes (yellow vests) movement in France currently has no affiliation with established political parties. As Anne Daguerre explains, this lack of a clear political platform has given rise to debates on the French left over whether the movement should be welcomed as a force for progressive politics or viewed with suspicion as an emanation of the populist […]

Share

Brexit: On being more or less semi-detached

In less than three months, the United Kingdom is set to leave the European Union. Martin Westlake writes that despite Brexit, internal and external forces are driving European states towards ever closer relations. The UK will remain an integral part of an ever-closer Europe, whatever the fine detail of its relations with the EU.

The European continent is covered by […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How to measure subjective poverty in France – and what this tells us about the anger of the Yellow Vests

How to measure subjective poverty in France – and what this tells us about the anger of the Yellow Vests

The ‘Yellow Vests’ protest movement which began in France at the end of 2018 has uncovered widespread anger among French citizens. But as Nicolas Duvoux and Adrien Papuchon explain, it is difficult to fully capture the scale of this resentment from an analysis of available poverty measures. Instead they suggest that an indicator of ‘subjective poverty’ is required to […]

Share

Greece: A tale of two migration stories

Greece was at the epicentre of both the Eurozone and migration crises, but as Gemma Bird and Amanda Russell Beattie write, each crisis has left a notably different mark on the country. Nowhere is this more evident than in Greek migration policy, where efforts to welcome investment and workers from abroad stand in striking contrast to the treatment of […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Council Democracy: Towards a Democratic Socialist Politics edited by James Muldoon

Book Review: Council Democracy: Towards a Democratic Socialist Politics edited by James Muldoon

In Council Democracy: Towards a Democratic Socialist Politics, editor James Muldoon brings together contributors to reopen discussion of councilist ideas and movements and to take the scholarship into new realms. While the chapters evidence the continuing tensions within the literature, this is a welcome and important contribution to the revival of this deeply emancipatory form of democratic socialism, writes Babak Amini. 
Council Democracy: Towards a […]

Share

Will Law and Justice win this year’s elections in Poland?

Poland’s ruling party, Law and Justice, has based its appeal on claiming to offer socio-economic stability and prosperity while downplaying controversial issues to avoid mobilising its opponents. Aleks Szczerbiak writes that ahead of parliamentary elections later this year, the party retains a lead in the polls and is still viewed as more credible than the liberal-centrist opposition on the […]

Share

Our top five articles of 2018

To mark the end of 2018 we’ve compiled a list of our most read articles from the last year, measured by page views.

Immigration was a key topic in Italy’s election campaign, with several candidates arguing that the flow of people into the country during the migration crisis has increased the risk of crime. But has immigration really generated more crime […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems edited by Erik S Herron, Robert J Pekkanen and Matthew S Shugart

Book Review: The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems edited by Erik S Herron, Robert J Pekkanen and Matthew S Shugart

Electoral systems are key components in the operation of representative democracies that vary considerably in their construction, with important consequences for how democracy is implemented. Ron Johnston reviews The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems which provides valuable overviews of many of the important topics studied by electoral system scholars, though he wonders about the relative value of such large and expensive volumes aimed […]

Share

Five charts on European politics in 2018

To mark the end of 2018 we’ve compiled a list of five charts on some of the major stories from the last twelve months in European politics.

In many EU states, wage growth has been lagging behind productivity growth over recent decades. Bela Galgoczi examined why wages and productivity – essential for a fair distribution of the spoils of economic […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Robotisation could help ‘reshore’ manufacturing jobs back to Europe

Robotisation could help ‘reshore’ manufacturing jobs back to Europe

Automation will have a major impact on the future of work, with many jobs that exist today potentially being replaced by automated processes. Toon van Overbeke argues that as technology is becoming cheaper and more advanced, the cost-benefit analysis of off-shoring could well be changing away from further outsourcing and towards reshoring manufacturing back to Europe.

One would be hard-pressed […]

Share