Blog Team

About Blog Team

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Blog Team has created 1687 entries.
  • Permalink Gallery

    Put Le Pen and Macron to one side – it’s the June legislative elections that will decide how France is governed

Put Le Pen and Macron to one side – it’s the June legislative elections that will decide how France is governed

France is due to hold the first round of its presidential election on 23 April, with Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron currently predicted to make the second round of voting on 7 May. As Françoise Boucek writes, however, despite the presidential contest generating all of the headlines, the legislative elections scheduled for 11 and 18 June will be […]

Share
  • Permalink A sign at Tbilisi Airport celebrating the Association Agreement signed between the EU and Georgia, Credit: Max FrasGallery

    Four takeaways from Albania’s EU visa liberalisation journey for Georgia

Four takeaways from Albania’s EU visa liberalisation journey for Georgia

New rules allowing Georgian citizens to travel to the Schengen Area without a visa will come into full effect today. As Max Fras writes, EU visa liberalisation has been presented by the Georgian government as a major success story, but drawing on the experience of Albania, he presents four lessons that the country’s politicians should keep in mind now […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The Scottish and UK governments should beware the Ides of March

The Scottish and UK governments should beware the Ides of March

Theresa May and Nicola Sturgeon will meet today to discuss the triggering of Article 50, which will begin the process of the UK leaving the European Union. Simon Toubeau and Jo Murkens assess the likely issues up for discussion, noting that if the two leaders maintain the direction they have taken, there could be a bumpy road ahead for […]

Share
  • Permalink Vigil in London on 23 March, Credit: <a href=Steve Eason (CC-BY-SA-2.0)" />Gallery

    The London attack traumatised all of us living in the UK, but we must not allow it to poison and divide us

The London attack traumatised all of us living in the UK, but we must not allow it to poison and divide us

Reflecting on the terrorist attack that took place in London on 22 March, which claimed the lives of four people, George Kassimeris writes on the nature of the modern terrorist threat that countries across Europe must now tackle. He notes that while the attack was traumatic for everyone living in the UK, it cannot be allowed to foster divisions in society.

One […]

Share
  • Permalink Credit: Marcus Rahm (CC-BY-SA-2.0)Gallery

    The Troika gave Ireland more autonomy over social security cuts than is commonly recognised

The Troika gave Ireland more autonomy over social security cuts than is commonly recognised

The so called ‘Troika’ of the European Commission, European Central Bank, and the International Monetary Fund was frequently criticised during the Eurozone crisis on the basis that it had imposed austerity on countries requiring a bailout. But how accurate was this picture in reality? Drawing on new research in Ireland, Rod Hick writes that the nature of Troika supervision […]

Share
  • Permalink Credit: <a href=Pietro Piupparco (CC-BY-SA-2.0)" />Gallery

    A few reasons why Le Pen could win the French presidential election, and a few more why she’ll still fall short

A few reasons why Le Pen could win the French presidential election, and a few more why she’ll still fall short

We are now entering the last month of campaigning before the first round of voting in the French presidential election on 23 April, with Marine Le Pen still leading in many opinion polls for the first round, but behind in polling for the second round. Ben Margulies assesses some of the key factors in her favour, and several more […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Why the fear of Islamization is driving populist right support – and what to do about it

Why the fear of Islamization is driving populist right support – and what to do about it

Mainstream parties need to begin addressing conservative whites’ anxieties about the demographic growth of Islam, or populists will continue to thrive, writes Eric Kaufmann. He argues that this demands a sustained programme for improving ‘demographic literacy’.

Geert Wilders may not have come first in the Dutch election, but he came second and forced his opponent, Mark Rutte, to tack closer to Wilders’ […]

Share
  • Permalink Credit: bruXella & bruXellius (CC-BY-SA-2.0)Gallery

    Final look at the Dutch election: A campaign of limited drama looks set to produce a remarkably fragmented parliament

Final look at the Dutch election: A campaign of limited drama looks set to produce a remarkably fragmented parliament

Dutch voters will go to the polls today for parliamentary elections against the backdrop of a diplomatic spat between the Netherlands and Turkey. Hans Vollaard writes that until the Turkish incident, the campaign had been surprisingly low-key, but the polling suggests an unprecedented level of fragmentation in parliament, with no party likely to win more than 30 seats.

The campaign […]

Share

Indyref2: A bold but unsurprising move from Nicola Sturgeon

In a speech on 13 March, Nicola Sturgeon outlined her intention to call a second Scottish independence referendum. Paul Anderson writes that while the announcement was not surprising given recent speculation, it was nevertheless a bold move on the part of Sturgeon. Only time will tell, however, whether she will be remembered as the First Minister who presided over […]

Share
  • Permalink Bridging the channel, Credit: Jonathan Oakley (CC-BY-SA-2.0)Gallery

    On the merits of the UK staying in Erasmus post-Brexit – and why the programme must look beyond university students

On the merits of the UK staying in Erasmus post-Brexit – and why the programme must look beyond university students

Although some countries that are not EU members participate in the Erasmus student exchange programme, it is unclear whether the UK will continue its participation following Brexit. Charlie Cadywould writes that educational and cultural exchanges will be vital for ensuring Britain does not close itself off from Europe, but that programmes like Erasmus need to do a much better […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The EU’s new white paper underlines why Europe needs to be more open to its citizens

The EU’s new white paper underlines why Europe needs to be more open to its citizens

At the start of March, the European Commission published a white paper ‘On the Future of Europe’. Vivien Schmidt and Matt Wood assess the Commission’s proposals, arguing that while the paper’s focus on differentiated integration is pragmatically useful under the current circumstances, this strategy could exacerbate distrust in the EU if it is not accompanied by greater accountability and […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    What conspiracy theories can tell us about politics in Greece

What conspiracy theories can tell us about politics in Greece

Conspiracy theories are a feature of political discourse in many countries across Europe, but what do they tell us about the nature of European politics? Alexis Papazoglou writes on the case of Greece, reasoning that conspiracy theories flourish where there is a lack of trust in politicians, and that the growth of populist politics is potentially pushing citizens toward […]

Share

Truth to tell: populism and the immigration debate

The populist surge that helped propel Brexit isn’t going to help the UK take control of its borders, writes Tim Bale. Neither Labour nor the Conservatives have been honest with voters about immigration policy, and that shows little signs of changing after a hard Brexit. The gap between rhetoric and reality has given politicians the opportunity to indulge in populist promises. […]

Share

How will Poland approach the Brexit negotiations?

Brexit means that Poland’s right-wing government is losing its most important EU ally and the opposition warns that the country could end up marginalised on the European periphery, writes Aleks Szczerbiak. But the government argues that Warsaw is a leader in debates on the EU’s future and is calling for a re-think of the trajectory of the European project. […]

Share

Italexit is not a solution for Italy’s problems

Beppe Grillo’s Five Star Movement riding high in the polls in Italy has led to speculation over the prospect of the country leaving the euro. Lorenzo Codogno and Giampaolo Galli argue that an ‘Italexit’ would be a catastrophic scenario, with incommensurable economic, social, and political costs lasting for many years. They note that redenomination, and a likely default on debt […]

Share
  • Permalink Credit: <a href=Tobias Higbie (CC-BY-SA-2.0)" />Gallery

    Upwards convergence: Why wage growth should be a priority for central and eastern Europe

Upwards convergence: Why wage growth should be a priority for central and eastern Europe

Wages vary significantly across European countries, but would increasing wages to create more convergence in pay levels have a damaging impact on competitiveness? Drawing on the examples of the Czech Republic, Germany and Romania, Martin Myant argues that there is scope for raising wages in central and eastern European countries to draw closer to western European levels without generating […]

Share
  • Permalink Romanian parliament building, Credit: <a href=Les Haines (CC-BY-SA-2.0)" />Gallery

    Survey evidence: Why people are protesting in Romania

Survey evidence: Why people are protesting in Romania

What has motivated Romanians to hit the streets in numbers unseen since the 1989 Revolution? Mihnea Stoica presents new survey evidence showing a breakdown of the protesters’ incentives. He concludes that the topic of corruption has developed into one of the main political cleavages prompting political action.

The last few days have seen massive protests all around Romania, triggered […]

Share
  • Permalink Credit: <a href=Paul Arne Wagner (CC-BY-SA-2.0)" />Gallery

    Romania: Reflections on the street protests and the country’s communist past

Romania: Reflections on the street protests and the country’s communist past

Protests have continued in Romania despite the government revoking a controversial decree that would have decriminalised some forms of misconduct by public officials. Dennis Deletant traces the roots of the protest through Romania’s communist past, writing that corruption, autocratic impulses, and incompetence have characterised the attitudes and actions of successive governments and the bureaucracy since the revolution.

Communism has cast […]

Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Why Trump’s Wall is not racist, the Muslim ban is, and why the difference matters

Why Trump’s Wall is not racist, the Muslim ban is, and why the difference matters

In his short time in office, President Trump has signed an order to construct his long-promised border wall with Mexico, and another which would stop refugees from entering the US and placed a 90-day ban on immigrants from seven Muslim countries. Eric Kaufmann writes that Trump’s Muslim ban classifies as ‘racist’ as it is based on an irrational fear of […]

Share
  • Permalink Credit: Public DomainGallery

    Book Review: Gramsci’s Common Sense: Inequality and its Narratives by Kate Crehan

Book Review: Gramsci’s Common Sense: Inequality and its Narratives by Kate Crehan

In Gramsci’s Common Sense: Inequality and its Narratives, Kate Crehan examines a number of core concepts in the work of theorist Antonio Gramsci – including common sense, the subaltern and the intellectual – that can help give precise insight into the emergence and persistence of social inequalities. Drawing on such case studies as the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street movements, […]

Share
January 22nd, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|