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About Andrea Shemberg

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So far Andrea Shemberg has created 17 entries.

The urgent need to rethink investment policymaking

In a 2015 submission for the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) Expert Meeting on “The Transformation of the International Investment Agreement Regime”, Andrea Saldarriaga and Andrea Shemberg argued that much of the criticism levelled against international investment agreements (IIAs) and Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) actually reflected much wider disappointments and frustrations with what international investment was delivering (or failing to deliver) to people globally.

Read the full article here.

 

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    Chilean Delegation hosted by LSE Lab to discuss National Action Plan for Business and Human Rights

Chilean Delegation hosted by LSE Lab to discuss National Action Plan for Business and Human Rights

 

On 3 July Andrea Saldarriaga, Visiting Fellow at the Laboratory for Advanced Research on the Global Economy (Lab), hosted a delegation of representatives from the Chilean government, including both the Under-Secretary for the Economy and Business and President of the Social Responsibility Council for Sustainable Development and the Chilean Ambassador to the UK. The meeting addressed the Chilean National Action Plan on Business and Human Rights and explored possible avenues for effective implementation, including in the area of foreign investment. Dr. Jan Kleinheisterkamp, Associate Professor of Law at the LSE and Andrea Shemberg, Visiting Fellow at the Lab,  attended to provide their expertise. Other experts invited included Lise Johnson from the Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment, Suzanne Spears from Notre Dame Law School and Peter Frankental from Amnesty International UK. The meeting is one important piece of work that Saldarriaga is undertaking to build understanding around State implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

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    Andrea Saldarriaga presented on challenges to responsible business in Iran at OECD Global Forum on Responsible Business Conduct

Andrea Saldarriaga presented on challenges to responsible business in Iran at OECD Global Forum on Responsible Business Conduct

On 29 June 2017 Andrea Saldarriaga, Visiting Fellow at the Lab, spoke on a panel at the OECD Global Forum on Responsible Business Conduct about how to ensure responsible infrastructure development in Iran.  Saldarriaga explained that the Government of Iran has identified infrastructure as one of the key areas in which it is seeking foreign investment. The government has identified what it calls an ‘urgent need’ to upgrade the country’s airports, rails, power generation, and water management. This is seen as critical to the country’s economic growth, and, as Saldarriaga highlighted, the imperative of infrastructure investment is magnified because infrastructure shortcomings have created bottlenecks that are thought to be driving away foreign investment in other areas.  Yet companies investing in Iran will face a number of complex challenges to responsible business.

While many are focused on sanctions, Saldarriaga highlighted risks that are receiving less attention but that are fundamental for people’s dignity and the viability of business ventures in infrastructure. These risks include, for example, the weak standards on occupational health and safety, where the rate of death from workplace injury in Iran is eight times the international average. Sixty percent of these deaths occur in the construction sector. There are also a number of risks related to the vulnerability of workers in infrastructure development in a country where 1/3 of the workforce is in the informal economy – with no social security or protection – and around 90% of the formal workforce is on temporary contracts where labour protections are weakly enforced.

Saldarriaga called on investors in infrastructure to pay special attention to the welfare of workers in their operations and those of their business partners and suppliers of products and services. She also called on mulitlateral […]

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    LSE hosts discussion on the Dutch Banking Sector Agreement on human rights

LSE hosts discussion on the Dutch Banking Sector Agreement on human rights

On 23 March, the Laboratory for Advanced Research on the Global Economy at the Centre for the Study of Human Rights in collaboration with the Law and Financial Markets Project and the Transnational Law Project hosted an evening discussion on Financial Institutions and Human Rights. The event attracted over 40 participants from banks, banking associations, law firms, students, academics and civil society. Andrea Saldarriaga moderated the discussion centred on the Dutch Banking Sector Agreement on human rights. Representatives from the Dutch Banking Association, ING Bank in the Netherlands and Standard Chartered Bank in the UK offered their insights on the agreement and whether such an initiative might make sense in the UK context. A lively debate followed, which was initiated by Dr. Philipp Paech, Andrea Shemberg and Dr. Jan Kleinheisterkamp.

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    Lab and Investment & Human Rights Project to host Iran human rights expert

Lab and Investment & Human Rights Project to host Iran human rights expert

On 11 November the Laboratory for Advanced Research on the Global Economy (Lab) and the Investment & Human Rights Project (IHR Project) will host Dr. Hadi Ghaemi in a lunchtime discussion with MSc Human Rights students at the Centre for the Study of Human Rights.      Dr. Ghaemi is an internationally recognised Iran analyst and human rights expert. He worked with Human Rights Watch as the Iran and United Arab Emirates researcher and was a member of the first UN-commissioned human rights fact finding mission to Afghanistan. He is founder and Executive Director of the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran, an organisation that has become one of the leading groups reporting and documenting human rights violations in Iran.

Now is an important moment for Iran. Following the ease of international sanctions, foreign investment is expected to grow quickly in Iran-after decades of isolation. However, investors will encounter a number of challenges in Iran, including with respect to human rights. Dr. Ghaemi will talk about the current state of human rights in Iran and will highlight some of the challenges that investors will confront in their efforts to engage in responsible business in Iran.

LSE Investment & Human Rights Project to host UN Panel

The LSE Investment & Human Rights Project (IHR Project) will host a high-level panel discussion at the upcoming UN Annual Forum on Business and Human Rights (UN Forum) in Geneva. The panel will discuss the experiences of governments and companies when implementing the UNGPs during major transitions–whether that be from conflict to peace or opening up to foreign investment after a period of isolation. Three country case studies will be at the centre of the discussion: Iran, Colombia and Liberia. The panelists include the ex-Attorney General from Liberia Christiana Tah, the Presidential High Commissioner on Human Rights from Colombia Paula Gaviria, the Secretary General of Ecopetrol Mónica Jiménez and the Executive Director of the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran Hadi Ghaemi. They will provide their insights about the specific country contexts and the challenges to UNGPs implementation. The panel will be moderated by IHR Project co-lead Andrea Shemberg.

This is the third time that the IHR Project has hosted a discussion at the UN Forum. The event this year is expected to attract over 2500 people from all over the globe. The updated programme be found here. The UN Forum is open to the public, but registration is required.

Session title: Implementing the UNGPs in times of major political, economic or social change: focus on investment
When: Monday 14 November, 16:40-18:00
Where: Palais des Nations, room XXII

 

 

 

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    LSE Investment & Human Rights Project and Business and Human Rights Resource Centre to host expert meeting on investment and human rights

LSE Investment & Human Rights Project and Business and Human Rights Resource Centre to host expert meeting on investment and human rights

On 19 October 2016 the IHR Project and the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre will host an expert meeting on investment and human rights. A group of human rights practitioners, investment specialists and academics from across the globe will gather at the LSE to discuss what international human rights law and policy can offer to current reform efforts regarding international investment.

During the last several years, international investment agreements, like the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership  (TTIP) being negotiated between Europe and the United States or the Transpacific Trade Partnership Agreement (TPPA) deal between the United States and  11 other countries have proven very controversial. Protests across Europe (embed link), in the United States, Latin America, Asia and Africa have expressed fears that such investment agreements do not create benefits for people, but instead benefit only large corporate interests to the detriment of human rights and democratic institutions.

Discussion about reforming these investment agreements to address some of the fears expressed across the world have begun. But the question remains whether the reform efforts, as they are being framed, will be sufficient to ensure that international investment will not infringe on people’s rights and will enhance the enjoyment of human rights such as access to an adequate standard of living, food, water, medical care and education.

The 19 October invitation-only meeting will look at whether a human rights perspective could help to ensure that reform efforts hit the mark. It will also address what research is needed to bring human rights to play meaningfully into the discussions about international investment reform and what role human rights advocates could play. A short note will be published on the Hub to provide the IHR Project’s reflections from the […]

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    IHRP to present new Guide on UNGPs and investment policymaking during UNCTAD multi-year expert meeting

IHRP to present new Guide on UNGPs and investment policymaking during UNCTAD multi-year expert meeting

On 16 March 2016 the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights is organising a special lunchtime session during the UNCTAD Multi-year Experts Meeting on Investment, Innovation and Entrepreneurship for Productive Capacity-building and Sustainable Development to launch the IHRP Guide on Implementing the UNGPs in Investment Policymaking. This event is a key opportunity for the IHRP to present the Guide and to engage with experts and State representatives about the UNGPs as they consider investment policy reforms at domestic, regional and multilateral levels.  The panel speakers will include Lene Wendland, Adviser on Business and Human Rights OHCHR; Andrea Saldarriaga, Co-lead IHRP and Joshua Curtis, School of Law and Social Justice, University of Liverpool. The full event information is available at the link below.

OHCHR event information: IHRP Guide on UNGPs and Investment Policymaking

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    New Guide to Implementing the UNGPs in Investment Policymaking available

New Guide to Implementing the UNGPs in Investment Policymaking available

The LSE IHRP has released its Guide to Implementing the UN Guiding Principles in Investment Policymaking. The web versions are now available in English, Spanish and Bahasa Indonesia.

Guide in English, PDF, 1MB

Guide in Spanish, PDF, 1MB

Guide in Bahasa Indonesia, PDF, 1MB

This Guide:

Aims to help States better implement their State duty to protect (DtP) under the UN Guiding Principles for 
Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) across investment policymaking.
Highlights why investment policymaking should be a priority area for UNGP implementation.
Offers a practical Guide to implementation by (i) mapping the diverse State functions, instruments and actors 
that are relevant throughout the life cycle of an investment project; (ii) presenting six key issues that are most
 relevant for implementing the UNGPs in investment policymaking; and (iii) providing ideas and examples of
 measures for State implementation.
Is intended for government officials who are involved in all stages of investment policymaking and for those
 leading the implementation of the UNGPs; it is also intended for use by civil society, business enterprises and
 other stakeholders who can contribute to improving the ability of States to protect human rights in the context 
of investment.

IHRP work on the UNGPs and Investment Policymaking:

This Guide is one outcome of a larger IHRP research and capacity building project on the implementation of the UNGPs in investment policymaking. In late 2015, the IHRP hosted workshops and dialogues in Colombia and Indonesia. The in-country work was aimed at providing recommendations for integrating investment policymaking in the respective National Action Plans on business and human rights (NAPs). The work was coordinated with the officials in each country leading on the development and implementation of the NAPs. Each workshop explored how the UNGPs apply to investment policymaking, and what this implies in […]

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    Opinion piece: India tries, and fails, to strengthen sovereignty and human rights in international investment law

Opinion piece: India tries, and fails, to strengthen sovereignty and human rights in international investment law

In late December 2015 the Indian government released the final text of its new Model Bilateral Investment Treaty (BIT). A draft text had been released in March 2015 and opened to public consultation. Going forward, India will try to use this new Model as a basis for its BIT negotiations with other States.  This opinion piece argues that the final text represents a missed opportunity. It reflects the standard features of BITs as we know them today and has removed important features that would have reinforced India’s sovereignty and the protection of human rights.

 

Read the opinion piece here.