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    ‘Common but differentiated responsibilities’: a beacon of realism

‘Common but differentiated responsibilities’: a beacon of realism

The principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibilities’ forms the core of international environmental law. Whilst it has been the object of vehement debate due to its endorsing of asymmetrical commitments among states, it seems that both in terms of bindingness, as well as content, the principle acts as an effective policy against climate change, reaching a realistic balance between the interests and […]

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    Philosophical discipline for strengthening justice and solidarity through social innovation

Philosophical discipline for strengthening justice and solidarity through social innovation

In response to the COVID-19 crisis and rising injustices, LSE Alum, Vrinda Chopra proposes a lateral concept of social innovation through an approach based on ideas of unlearning, relearning and shared learning to deepen justice and solidarity in our development paradigms.

The moral dilemmas involved in the plight marginalized population groups as countries went into lockdown in response to COVID-19 ignited […]

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    Why Pakistan needs a disability-inclusive transport for meaningful development?

Why Pakistan needs a disability-inclusive transport for meaningful development?

MSc Social Policy & Development Alum, Maryam Naqvi argues that the Government of Pakistan should prioritise the mobility needs of disabled people and re-design the urban transport system to make it convenient and inclusive for everyone which is beneficial for the economy and development of Pakistan.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), almost one billion or 15 percent of the world’s population comprises […]

Redefining power and influence in the post Covid-19 world

Incoming International Development PhD candidate, Ritika Arora argues that the metrics which measure how a country responds to threats of various kinds, should hold greater value in evaluating a country’s position of power, vis-à-vis their ability to attack and defend in traditional warfare, or their GDP. 

I recently found myself in conversation with a colleague about the inevitable shift in perceptions of power underpinning the international political economy, following the surge of COVID-19. Whilst […]

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    How can technology and behaviour change interventions improve the health of people with disabilities?

How can technology and behaviour change interventions improve the health of people with disabilities?

The International Development Consultancy Project gives students the opportunity to work with organisations on real-world contemporary development issues. MSc Health and International Development Student, Nathan Willis tells us about his team’s  experience in providing cutting-edge research in partnership with Humanity & Inclusion.

As part of the International Development Consultancy project on the MSc Health and International Development programme, I was given […]

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    Zooming In With: Professor in Practice Duncan Green | Critical junctures and Covid-19

Zooming In With: Professor in Practice Duncan Green | Critical junctures and Covid-19

In this episode, tables turn and Professor Jean-Paul Faguet Zooms In with Professor in Practice, Duncan Green, to find out what he has been up to in lockdown and how his research relates to the Covid-19 pandemic. Professor Green tells us how his background in physics helps him understand structures of power between citizens and the state, and explains […]

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    What’s next in Sudan’s fight against female genital mutilation?

What’s next in Sudan’s fight against female genital mutilation?

Programme associate at The United Nations Population Fund Sudan and LSE alum, Giulia di Porcia e Brugnera tells us about the progress being made in Sudan’s fight against female genital mutilation. 

On April 22, Sudan’s transitional government considered two laws that would criminalize female genital mutilation nationwide. Although the two laws are awaiting approval, this signals the Government’s strong willingness […]

Will Patents stop Covid drugs from saving lives?

Professor Kenneth Shadlen questions whether patents and the global race to develop vaccines and treatments for Covid-19 will hinder access to the products it generates. 

The Covid-19 pandemic has sparked a global race of public- and private-led research to develop vaccines and treatments. Will patents hinder access to the products it generates?

My summary? With regard to treatments (the dynamics around vaccines may […]

  • Permalink Satellite image from 12 November 2015, one week after the disaster.
Photograph: ©CNES 2015 Distribution Airbus DSGallery

    ‘Environmental’ catastrophes: an overview of the power relations behind the Mariana Dam Disaster in Brazil

‘Environmental’ catastrophes: an overview of the power relations behind the Mariana Dam Disaster in Brazil

On November 2015, the Mariana Dam burst and released up to 63 million cubic meters of toxic mud into the environment, causing irreversible damages in the States of Minas Gerais and Espírito Santo. The main narrative describes the disaster as an environmental one. However, this narrative risks to cloud important aspects related to social justice, development and dispossession practices. […]

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    Zooming In With: Professor Naila Kabeer | Social protection and Covid-19

Zooming In With: Professor Naila Kabeer | Social protection and Covid-19

Professor in Practice, Duncan Green, Zooms In with department scholars to find out what they’re up to in lockdown and how their research relates to the Covid-19 pandemic. The fifth Zooming In episode is with social economist, Professor Naila Kabeer who tells us how an interdisciplinary approach to economics helps her find answers to social problems, and why social protection could be a […]