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So far Ros Taylor has created 778 entries.

We are still perilously close to Hailsham’s ‘elective dictatorship’

In the 1970s, Lord Hailsham warned that Britain was in danger of sinking into an ‘elective dictatorship’ because of the vulnerability of its constitutional arrangements. Julian Petley (Brunel University London) says his warning, which was aimed at the left, is more relevant than ever as Boris Johnson’s government tries to impose its will on Parliament.

Not only did Boris Johnson attempt […]

September 30th, 2019|Featured, No deal, UK politics|0 Comments|

How Brexit reinvigorated the Welsh independence movement

A growing number of Welsh citizens now favour an independent Wales, thanks partly to Plaid Cymru’s decision to position itself as a Remain party. Jac Larner (Cardiff University) looks at how Welsh Labour has begun to question the country’s future as part of the UK, and discusses geographer Danny Dorling’s argument that English retirees living in Wales tipped the […]

  • prorogation lords
    Permalink In the House of Lords, 10 September 2019. Photo: <a href=UK Parliament. Copyright House of Lords 2019 / Photography by Roger Harris." />Gallery

    The Supreme Court judges are oiling the democratic machine, not telling it what to produce

The Supreme Court judges are oiling the democratic machine, not telling it what to produce

The Miller2/Cherry case is not about judges seizing the policy agenda, whatever the critics of the outcome might say, writes Conor Gearty (LSE). In this decision the judges are oiling the democratic machine, not telling it what to produce. This Supreme Court decision is a telling illustration of why all populist authoritarians need to dismantle the independent judiciary.

In March 1954, that […]

The Supreme Court ruling: why the effects test could help save democracy (somewhat)

It is hard to overestimate the political as well as the legal implications of today’s ground-breaking Supreme Court ruling, writes Tarun Khaitan (University of Oxford). It applied an effects-based test to the case rather than trying to establish the purpose of Boris Johnson’s move to prorogue Parliament. In doing so it created a brand new and sophisticated ammunition in the […]

How little we know: reflections on our ignorance of the EU

Both Leavers and Remainers are almost equally ignorant about the workings of the EU. Dorothy Bishop (University of Oxford) looks at research into how cognitive biases influence people’s opinions of the Union, and questions whether, given how little voters knew, the referendum was valid.

As a Remainer, I am baffled as to what Brexiteers want. If you ask them, as […]

  • rebecca riots
    Permalink The Rebecca Riots pictured in the Illustrated London News, 1843. Image: <a href=Wikimedia Commons. Public domain" />Gallery

    A no-deal Brexit would be very tough for farmers – but will the public sympathise?

A no-deal Brexit would be very tough for farmers – but will the public sympathise?

Upland farmers face losing more than a third of their income in the event of a no-deal Brexit, says Richard Byrne (Harper Adams University). In the past, some farmers have taken direct action when government and supermarket policies have threatened their income – but given the (albeit limited) financial support they can expect to receive, they may find it […]

From ‘purpose’ to ‘effect’: a principled way to decide whether prorogation is legal

Anne Twomey argued on LSE Brexit that the Supreme Court should focus on the fact that Boris Johnson has lost the confidence of the Commons. Given that he has not yet lost a vote of no confidence, Tarunabh Khaitan (University of Oxford) says this is a problematic approach. Instead, the Court should ask whether prorogation is likely to have […]

Rational high ground or compromise? Liberal strategies for coping with Brexit

How do liberal Remainers negotiate their dismay and shock at the Leave vote? Daphne Fietz (LSE) talked to nine people who voted Remain and analysed the comment section of the Guardian. She discusses how they deployed different liberal values in an effort to either distance themselves from the ‘irrationality’ of Leavers, or seek compromise.

While Brexit may be imminent, no […]

When is prorogation ‘improper’?

What would make Boris Johnson’s prorogation of Parliament ‘improper’? Anne Twomey (University of Sydney) argues that the Supreme Court should focus on the fact that the PM has lost the confidence of the Commons – which is a breach of constitutional principle – rather than on the political advantages he might secure by shutting down Parliament.

Prorogation is primarily a procedural […]

The Supreme Court should repair the tear in the fabric of the constitution that prorogation has opened up

The Supreme Court is considering whether Boris Johnson’s prorogation of Parliament is lawful. Thomas Poole (LSE) says the claimants face two hurdles: one concerns the involvement of the Queen, the other whether prorogation is a purely political or a justiciable issue. He argues that the court should recognise that the power to prorogue has legal limits.

On 28 August, the […]