Caribbean

  • Permalink Gallery

    Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Ciudad Juárez operates as a necropolis where femicide legislation coexists with reductionist and patriarchal approaches to gender violence. The victims of killings and disappearances are presented as prostitutes, and those who investigate are seen to be staining the city’s good name. Mexico’s lax justice system and the free-trade zones of the maquiladora industry provide the enabling context, writes María Encarnación López (London Metropolitan University).

  • Permalink Gallery

    Para cumplir con los derechos de los sujetos victimizados Colombia debe repensar el papel de las comisiones de la verdad

Para cumplir con los derechos de los sujetos victimizados Colombia debe repensar el papel de las comisiones de la verdad

La Comisión de Esclarecimiento de la Verdad debe romper con el esquema dominante que busca un ritual de purificación para ‘pasar la página’. Requiere una vocación transformadora de la justicia transicional, de las Comisiones de la Verdad y de la memoria, además de un Gran Diálogo Nacional por la Verdad que supere la reglamentación de la Comisión y que involucre a la sociedad […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: the two Alvarados, between deepening division and democratic dependability

Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: the two Alvarados, between deepening division and democratic dependability

The two contenders in Costa Rica’s presidential runoff on 1 April 2018, Fabricio Alvarado (PRN) and Carlos Alvarado (PAC), are diametric opposites on the issues that have dominated recent elections, and their supporters are also divided along geographic and socioeconomic lines. Thankfully, a healthy democratic context militates against the worst effects of polarisation, write Evelyn Villarreal Fernández (State of the Nation Programme) and Bruce M. Wilson (University of […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: corruption, morality politics, and voter alienation make uncertainty the only certainty

Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: corruption, morality politics, and voter alienation make uncertainty the only certainty

In a context of political dealignment and a fluid multiparty system, corruption scandals and a divisive international court ruling on sexual and reproductive rights have drastically altered the electoral landscape, write Evelyn Villarreal Fernández (State of the Nation Programme) and Bruce M. Wilson (University of Central Florida).

  • Permalink Gallery

    Full steam ahead: geothermal energy can fuel the future of the Eastern Caribbean

Full steam ahead: geothermal energy can fuel the future of the Eastern Caribbean

Though geothermal energy is a more involved and expensive undertaking than other renewables, its significant benefits make it an ideal way for the Eastern Caribbean to gain greater energy independence, reduce energy costs, and achieve sustainable development, writes Judith Ephraim (Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States).

  • Permalink Shot of a public bicycle station in Mexico CityGallery

    What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme systematically broke down social barriers to enable the introduction of a new mode of public transport. Naima von Ritter Figueres (LSE International Development) analyses its success and considers whether this approach could work in other megacities around the world.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Are reparations transforming Colombian women’s lives? The gendered dynamics of the Victims’ Law

Are reparations transforming Colombian women’s lives? The gendered dynamics of the Victims’ Law

With a change of approach, reparations could reinforce a long-term process of gendered citizenship-building instead of treating women as dependent and unequal victims, writes Sanne Weber (University of Birmingham).

  • Permalink Gallery

    Routes to formality: transport accessibility, skills, and labour markets in Bogotá

Routes to formality: transport accessibility, skills, and labour markets in Bogotá

Workers living close to TransMilenio bus-rapid-transit stations in the Colombian capital have a lower probability of being in informal employment, but proximity impacts differently on high- and low-skilled workers, writes  Nicolás Oviedo Dávila, winner of the 2017 LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre-Inter-American Development Bank Postgraduate Essay Prize.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Calling death by its name: breaking the silence of Guatemala’s National Police Archive

Calling death by its name: breaking the silence of Guatemala’s National Police Archive

Quantitative analysis of historical ‘big data’ can help to explain how record-making practices around death facilitated policies of repression and control, writes Tamy Guberek (University of Michigan).

  • Permalink Gallery

    Is it wise to decapitate organised armed groups? The case of Colombia’s Clan del Golfo

Is it wise to decapitate organised armed groups? The case of Colombia’s Clan del Golfo

Demobilisation of this armed group is an opportunity not to be missed. In a context of FARC disarmament and a peace process with the ELN, the state can establish its presence throughout the country and smooth the road to peace, write Juan David Gélvez and Michael Weintraub (Universidad de los Andes).