Mexico & Central America

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    Big promises, few details: the uncertain future of Mexican healthcare under AMLO

Big promises, few details: the uncertain future of Mexican healthcare under AMLO

Though Mexico’s Seguro Popular public health-insurance scheme has been a great success, system fragmentation, underfunding, coverage limitations, and corruption remain serious challenges. AMLO appears to have the will to reform both the scheme and wider Mexican healthcare, but the way is far less obvious, write Rocio Nava and Emily Adrion (University of Edinburgh).

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    Llamando la muerte por su nombre: rompiendo el silencio del Archivo de la Policía Nacional de Guatemala

Llamando la muerte por su nombre: rompiendo el silencio del Archivo de la Policía Nacional de Guatemala

El análisis cuantitativo del “big data” histórico puede contribuir a explicar cómo las prácticas de generación de registros en torno a la muerte facilitaron las políticas de represión y control, escribe Tamy Guberek (University of Michigan).

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    El Plan Nacional de AMLO para México es motivo de optimismo

El Plan Nacional de AMLO para México es motivo de optimismo

López Obrador y su equipo multidisciplinario proponen políticas económicas y sociales inclusivas que buscan reactivar la inversión y mejorar la competitividad y la equidad. Pero también explican cómo estas políticas se financiarán a través de reducciones en costos operativos y medidas anticorrupción, escribe Graciana del Castillo (CUNY).

AMLO’s National Plan for Mexico is a cause for optimism

López Obrador and his multidisciplinary team propose inclusive economic and social policies that aim to reactivate investment and make the Mexican economy more competitive and equitable. Crucially, he also explains how such policies will be financed through reductions in operational costs and in corruption, writes Graciana del Castillo (City University of New York).

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    The massive economic cost of violence in Mexico must be matched by higher public spending

The massive economic cost of violence in Mexico must be matched by higher public spending

The financial burden of violence for the Mexican economy will require a significant adjustment to the federal government’s internal security expenditure, irrespective of who wins the upcoming election, write Mohib Iqbal and José Luengo Cabrera (Institute for Economics and Peace).

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    Despite reform, Mexico’s 2018 election is business as usual

Despite reform, Mexico’s 2018 election is business as usual

On paper the 2018 Mexican presidential election should benefit from recent reforms that sought to improve electoral conditions. But the reality of campaigns awash with dark money, widespread vote buying, toothless electoral institutions, weak democratic processes within parties, and independents that aren’t very independent suggests that little has really changed, writes Rodrigo Aguilera.

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    Religion, the state, and the states explain why Mexico has stronger LGBT rights than the US

Religion, the state, and the states explain why Mexico has stronger LGBT rights than the US

New research reveals the puzzling finding that Mexico has offered greater legal equality for LGBT people for a longer period of time than the United States. This can be explained by the wider separation of church and state in Mexican politics and the strong importance of human rights in new democracies. At the subnational level, states with more LGBT organisations […]

Strengthening rural value chains in Latin America

Global actors can interact along local value chains through international trade and foreign direct investment flows. By leveraging the value-chain approach for rural areas, recent policies have led to economic and social upgrading in Latin America, writes Ramón Padilla Pérez (UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean).

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    El Salvador elections 2018: security, migration, and the beginning of the end for two-party rule

El Salvador elections 2018: security, migration, and the beginning of the end for two-party rule

El Salvador’s legislative and municipal elections on Sunday, 4 March, 2018, kick off an election cycle that will stretch through to next year’s presidential ballot. A desperate security situation, threats to Salvadoran migrants in the US, and a growing generation gap in traditional parties could mean a bumpy ride for the country’s politics, writes Adrian Bergmann (Central American University).

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    Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Ciudad Juárez operates as a necropolis where femicide legislation coexists with reductionist and patriarchal approaches to gender violence. The victims of killings and disappearances are presented as prostitutes, and those who investigate are seen to be staining the city’s good name. Mexico’s lax justice system and the free-trade zones of the maquiladora industry provide the enabling context, writes María Encarnación López (London Metropolitan University).