Mexico & Central America

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    Crime costs some Latin American countries more than 6 per cent of their GDP

Crime costs some Latin American countries more than 6 per cent of their GDP

The cost to Latin America of being the world’s most violent region is not only a human one. New research by Laura Jaitman reveals that its enormous economic costs are equal to annual spending on infrastructure, or enough to halve the region’s housing deficit.

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    US pressure on Nicaragua will only stall diplomatic engagement and harm its most vulnerable groups

US pressure on Nicaragua will only stall diplomatic engagement and harm its most vulnerable groups

Even with Venezuela’s substantial support in doubt, the nature of Nicaraguan trade, migration, and aid links with the US makes the country less vulnerable to pressure than many expect. Instead, diplomacy and civil society will bear the brunt of unintended consequences, writes Pamela Neumann.

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    Mexico’s experience shows that development banks can play a key role in financing transitions to low-carbon economies

Mexico’s experience shows that development banks can play a key role in financing transitions to low-carbon economies

Transitioning to low-carbon economies is a vital goal for developing countries, yet significant teething problems remain in the field of climate finance. The case of NAFIN and Mexican wind energy reveals how national development banks are ideally placed to help stimulate this crucial investment, writes Emilio Garmendia Pérez Montero.

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    The Mexican left should beware nationalism’s crushing embrace

The Mexican left should beware nationalism’s crushing embrace

The history of the left in Mexico shows that embracing nationalism can lead to the lack of a distinct programme and the misreading of opponents as potential allies, writes William A. Booth.

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    Poetic notions of death in Mexico no longer fit the grim reality of everyday drug violence

Poetic notions of death in Mexico no longer fit the grim reality of everyday drug violence

The romantic idea of death as the quintessence of Mexicanness masks real suffering in a country where senseless death has become commonplace, writes Myriam Lamrani.

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    Funding Trump’s Mexico border wall though an import tax would only hurt ordinary Americans

Funding Trump’s Mexico border wall though an import tax would only hurt ordinary Americans

Construction of a US-Mexico border wall was a cornerstone of Donald Trump’s election campaign. But with Mexico refusing to pay for it, his government has proposed to recoup the cost through a 20 per cent tax on Mexican imports. The reality is that this tax would be paid by US importers, raising costs for US consumers and businesses, writes Stuart Brown.

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    Brexit could hit investment, trade, aid, and integration in Latin America, but there will also be opportunities

Brexit could hit investment, trade, aid, and integration in Latin America, but there will also be opportunities

Brexit is likely to affect foreign direct investment, trade, and development funding in Latin America, aside from being politically influential. But despite the negatives, it may also provide opportunities to strengthen ties with the UK, writes Michelle Campbell.

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    Daniel Ortega’s latest election win in Nicaragua is rooted in his traumatic defeat three decades ago

Daniel Ortega’s latest election win in Nicaragua is rooted in his traumatic defeat three decades ago

Daniel Ortega’s landslide victory in Nicaragua’s recent elections reflects what he learnt from his devastating loss to Violeta Chamorro in 1990, writes Eline van Ommen.

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    The population centres that Columbus found in 1492 persist as major cities in the Americas

The population centres that Columbus found in 1492 persist as major cities in the Americas

It may not be possible to change centuries-old spatial distributions of economic activity, argue William F. Maloney and Felipe Valencia Caicedo.

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    Mexico and the US must realise that NAFTA is the solution not the problem

Mexico and the US must realise that NAFTA is the solution not the problem

Former President of Mexico (1988-94) Carlos Salinas de Gortari, one of the architects of the North American Free Trade Agreement, argues that NAFTA’s significant achievements have been underplayed.