Mexico & Central America

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    Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Ciudad Juárez operates as a necropolis where femicide legislation coexists with reductionist and patriarchal approaches to gender violence. The victims of killings and disappearances are presented as prostitutes, and those who investigate are seen to be staining the city’s good name. Mexico’s lax justice system and the free-trade zones of the maquiladora industry provide the enabling context, writes María Encarnación López (London Metropolitan University).

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    Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: the two Alvarados, between deepening division and democratic dependability

Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: the two Alvarados, between deepening division and democratic dependability

The two contenders in Costa Rica’s presidential runoff on 1 April 2018, Fabricio Alvarado (PRN) and Carlos Alvarado (PAC), are diametric opposites on the issues that have dominated recent elections, and their supporters are also divided along geographic and socioeconomic lines. Thankfully, a healthy democratic context militates against the worst effects of polarisation, write Evelyn Villarreal Fernández (State of the Nation Programme) and Bruce M. Wilson (University of […]

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    Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: corruption, morality politics, and voter alienation make uncertainty the only certainty

Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: corruption, morality politics, and voter alienation make uncertainty the only certainty

In a context of political dealignment and a fluid multiparty system, corruption scandals and a divisive international court ruling on sexual and reproductive rights have drastically altered the electoral landscape, write Evelyn Villarreal Fernández (State of the Nation Programme) and Bruce M. Wilson (University of Central Florida).

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    Recent innovations in Costa Rican development show the value of Global Value Chain analysis

Recent innovations in Costa Rican development show the value of Global Value Chain analysis

By allowing an understanding of where, how, and by whom economic, social, and environmental value is created and distributed, Global Value Chain research can help to address key development and competitiveness issues, write Gary Gereffi and Karina Fernández-Stark (Duke University Global Value Chain Centre).

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    El Salvador’s experience of UN peacebuilding reveals the ineffectiveness of ‘development as usual’ approaches

El Salvador’s experience of UN peacebuilding reveals the ineffectiveness of ‘development as usual’ approaches

To provide the vital “peace dividend” of better lives and livelihoods, peacebuilding must promote conflict-sensitive policies even where they are economically second-best. The UN can support this process by helping states in transition to reactivate their economies in an inclusive and sustainable manner, writes Graciana del Castillo (City University of New York).

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    What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme systematically broke down social barriers to enable the introduction of a new mode of public transport. Naima von Ritter Figueres (LSE International Development) analyses its success and considers whether this approach could work in other megacities around the world.

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    Calling death by its name: breaking the silence of Guatemala’s National Police Archive

Calling death by its name: breaking the silence of Guatemala’s National Police Archive

Quantitative analysis of historical ‘big data’ can help to explain how record-making practices around death facilitated policies of repression and control, writes Tamy Guberek (University of Michigan).

  • Permalink Controversial events such as the Tlatelolco protests and subsequent massacre in 1968 Marcellí Perelló, public domainGallery

    Mexico’s new General Law on Archives could jeopardise research, journalism, and transparency

Mexico’s new General Law on Archives could jeopardise research, journalism, and transparency

By placing archives under direct control of the executive and creating retroactive rules to define the historical, Mexico’s proposed General Law on Archives could damage academic, journalistic, and popular access to collective memory, writes Alejandro de Coss Corzo.

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    Crime costs some Latin American countries more than 6 per cent of their GDP

Crime costs some Latin American countries more than 6 per cent of their GDP

The cost to Latin America of being the world’s most violent region is not only a human one. New research by Laura Jaitman reveals that its enormous economic costs are equal to annual spending on infrastructure, or enough to halve the region’s housing deficit.

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    US pressure on Nicaragua will only stall diplomatic engagement and harm its most vulnerable groups

US pressure on Nicaragua will only stall diplomatic engagement and harm its most vulnerable groups

Even with Venezuela’s substantial support in doubt, the nature of Nicaraguan trade, migration, and aid links with the US makes the country less vulnerable to pressure than many expect. Instead, diplomacy and civil society will bear the brunt of unintended consequences, writes Pamela Neumann.