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    The migrant caravan is a practical and political reaction to Mexico’s futile attempts at dissuasion

The migrant caravan is a practical and political reaction to Mexico’s futile attempts at dissuasion

Mexico’s resort to riot police and tear gas is part of a wider effort to scare migrants into returning to Central America. But push factors like extreme violence and grinding poverty weigh far more in the balance than shows of dissuasive violence, writes Alejandra Díaz de Leon (LSE Department of Sociology).

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    Elites, violence, and the crisis of governance in Latin America

Elites, violence, and the crisis of governance in Latin America

Relations between the state and oligarchic elites underpin the extreme rise of violence in Latin America, despite the fact that most of its victims and perpetrators are poor: violence is as much a problem of wealth as of poverty. Jenny Pearce (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre) discusses her working paper for our new Violence, Security, and Peace series, Elites and Violence in Latin America: […]

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    Sex trafficking and sexual exploitation are collateral damage of Mexico’s neoliberal fantasy

Sex trafficking and sexual exploitation are collateral damage of Mexico’s neoliberal fantasy

An epidemic of sexual trafficking and exploitation of women and children has turned Mexico into the “Latin American Thailand”. Incoming president Andrés Manuel López Obrador promises to tackle the corruption and impunity enabling these practices, but there is less recognition of their links to a neoliberal fantasy that was once presented as lifeline for poor communities, writes María Encarnación López (London Metropolitan University).

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    Shadow carbon pricing can help development banks reduce emissions in Mexico and beyond

Shadow carbon pricing can help development banks reduce emissions in Mexico and beyond

Carbon pricing offers development banks like Mexico’s NAFIN a way to encourage organisations to reduce emissions through adoption of improved technologies and practices. But these positive effects could be further reinforced by encouraging companies to adopt shadow prices, writes Cesar Espinosa García (Nacional Financiera).

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    Is socialism to blame for Venezuela’s never-ending crisis?

Is socialism to blame for Venezuela’s never-ending crisis?

Though ’21st-century socialism’ is implicated in Venezuela’s collapse, so too are many characteristics of the country’s context, capitalism, and culture, writes Asa Cusack (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre). • n.b. republished courtesy of Al Jazeera; Creative Commons licence does not apply

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    The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank comes knocking on Latin America’s door: is anyone home?

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank comes knocking on Latin America’s door: is anyone home?

Although Latin America provides a third of the AIIB’s prospective members and co-financing is desperately needed, the region has been slow to respond to the bank’s repeated overtures, writes Álvaro Méndez (LSE Global South Unit).

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    From the favelas of Rio to the Kasbah of Algiers, community participation is the key to urban regeneration

From the favelas of Rio to the Kasbah of Algiers, community participation is the key to urban regeneration

The perceptions, behaviour, dreams, and aspirations of human communities need to be studied and recognised as a crucial source of urban expertise without which urban transformations remain partial and unsustainable, write Sandra Jovchelovitch (LSE) and Jacqueline Priego Hernández (University of Portsmouth).

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    Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Ciudad Juárez operates as a necropolis where femicide legislation coexists with reductionist and patriarchal approaches to gender violence. The victims of killings and disappearances are presented as prostitutes, and those who investigate are seen to be staining the city’s good name. Mexico’s lax justice system and the free-trade zones of the maquiladora industry provide the enabling context, writes María Encarnación López (London Metropolitan University).

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    Digital inequalities policies in Latin America are mostly words and little accountability, just like in Europe

Digital inequalities policies in Latin America are mostly words and little accountability, just like in Europe

Digital inequalities policies must tailor their interventions to the problems, needs, and outcomes of specific vulnerable groups if they are to move beyond good intentions and achieve real socioeconomic change, writes Ellen Helsper (LSE Department of Media and Communications).

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    What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme systematically broke down social barriers to enable the introduction of a new mode of public transport. Naima von Ritter Figueres (LSE International Development) analyses its success and considers whether this approach could work in other megacities around the world.