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    The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank comes knocking on Latin America’s door: is anyone home?

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank comes knocking on Latin America’s door: is anyone home?

Although Latin America provides a third of the AIIB’s prospective members and co-financing is desperately needed, the region has been slow to respond to the bank’s repeated overtures, writes Álvaro Méndez (LSE Global South Unit).

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    From the favelas of Rio to the Kasbah of Algiers, community participation is the key to urban regeneration

From the favelas of Rio to the Kasbah of Algiers, community participation is the key to urban regeneration

The perceptions, behaviour, dreams, and aspirations of human communities need to be studied and recognised as a crucial source of urban expertise without which urban transformations remain partial and unsustainable, write Sandra Jovchelovitch (LSE) and Jacqueline Priego Hernández (University of Portsmouth).

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    Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Ciudad Juárez operates as a necropolis where femicide legislation coexists with reductionist and patriarchal approaches to gender violence. The victims of killings and disappearances are presented as prostitutes, and those who investigate are seen to be staining the city’s good name. Mexico’s lax justice system and the free-trade zones of the maquiladora industry provide the enabling context, writes María Encarnación López (London Metropolitan University).

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    Digital inequalities policies in Latin America are mostly words and little accountability, just like in Europe

Digital inequalities policies in Latin America are mostly words and little accountability, just like in Europe

Digital inequalities policies must tailor their interventions to the problems, needs, and outcomes of specific vulnerable groups if they are to move beyond good intentions and achieve real socioeconomic change, writes Ellen Helsper (LSE Department of Media and Communications).

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    What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme systematically broke down social barriers to enable the introduction of a new mode of public transport. Naima von Ritter Figueres (LSE International Development) analyses its success and considers whether this approach could work in other megacities around the world.

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    Pode o sucesso do Brasil na resposta à intersecção de desigualdades ser um modelo para o resto do mundo?

Pode o sucesso do Brasil na resposta à intersecção de desigualdades ser um modelo para o resto do mundo?

Sempre citado como tendo uma das sociedades mais desiguais do mundo, o Brasil progrediu significantemente na redução da disparidade, entre 2002 e 2013, principalmente entre os que sofrem com interseccionalidade de desigualdades múltiplas e acumuladas. Em um esboço de seu recente artigo para o Instituto de Desigualdade Internacional, Naila Kabeer (LSE International Development/Gender Studies) e Ricardo Santos (UNU-WIDER) argumentam que entender melhor o progresso brasileiro […]

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    Poor health outcomes amongst Afro-Colombians are driven by discrimination as well as economic disadvantage

Poor health outcomes amongst Afro-Colombians are driven by discrimination as well as economic disadvantage

Differential health outcomes are driven by both structural and internalised forms of discrimination, so strategies targeting health disparities amongst Afro-Colombians must adopt an integrated approach, writes Maria Cecilia Dedios (LSE Psychological and Behavioural Science).

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    In Latin America as in the wider world, corruption is rooted in our relationships

In Latin America as in the wider world, corruption is rooted in our relationships

Acknowledging that cooperation and corruption are two sides of the same coin can help us to understand why some states succeed and others fail, why some oscillate, and which triggers lead failed states to succeed and successful states to fail, writes Michael Muthukrishna (LSE Psychological and Behavioural Science).

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    From suffrage to insurgency, female rebelliousness has always been crucial to peace in Colombia

From suffrage to insurgency, female rebelliousness has always been crucial to peace in Colombia

The feminist movement in Colombia has a long and complex history. Its collective political activities have constructed different subjects made up of multiple identities and political perspectives, yet they have always been united by their desire for peace and their spirit of revolt, writes Erika Rodríguez Gómez (LSE Centre for Women, Peace, and Security).

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    Could Brazil’s success in tackling intersecting inequalities be a model for the rest of the world?

Could Brazil’s success in tackling intersecting inequalities be a model for the rest of the world?

Often cited as one of the most unequal societies in the world, between 2002 and 2013 Brazil made significant progress in reducing inequality, especially amongst those facing multiple and overlapping inequalities. Drawing on insights from their recent working paper for the LSE International Inequalities Institute, Naila Kabeer (LSE International Development/Gender Studies) and Ricardo Santos (UNU-WIDER) argue that a better understanding of Brazil’s achievements could help other countries make real progress towards the […]