Latin America

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    El Chile de Pinochet nos muestra que la represión puede ser el fin de los dictadores

El Chile de Pinochet nos muestra que la represión puede ser el fin de los dictadores

Las violaciones a los derechos humanos cometidas durante la dictadura militar de Augusto Pinochet en Chile contribuyeron a una derrota electoral que determinó su salida del poder. Sorprendentemente, esto ocurrió sin que cambiaran las preferencias políticas de los ciudadanos. Por María Angélica Bautista, Felipe González, Luis Martínez, Pablo Muñoz y Mounu Prem.

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    Election observation urgently needs to adapt to the era of big data

Election observation urgently needs to adapt to the era of big data

The ability to carry out free and fair elections faces an imminent threat, particularly in polarised electoral contexts. Latin America could place itself in the vanguard by exploring pilot schemes that monitor new digital trends and help to harmonise technology, democracy, and citizenship, writes Renata Ávila (Ciudadano Inteligente).

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    Pinochet’s Chile shows that repression can spell the end for dictators

Pinochet’s Chile shows that repression can spell the end for dictators

Human rights violations committed by Augusto Pinochet’s military dictatorship in Chile contributed to the electoral defeat that led to his downfall. Surprisingly, this happened without changing citizens’ political alignment, write María Angélica Bautista, Felipe González, Luis Martínez, Pablo Muñoz, and Mounu Prem.

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    The migrant caravan is a practical and political reaction to Mexico’s futile attempts at dissuasion

The migrant caravan is a practical and political reaction to Mexico’s futile attempts at dissuasion

Mexico’s resort to riot police and tear gas is part of a wider effort to scare migrants into returning to Central America. But push factors like extreme violence and grinding poverty weigh far more in the balance than shows of dissuasive violence, writes Alejandra Díaz de Leon (LSE Department of Sociology).

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    Latin America and the Caribbean needs to do more with less and set its sights on the future

Latin America and the Caribbean needs to do more with less and set its sights on the future

Growing national income in Latin America and the Caribbean is feeding demands for more and better government services. But after raising expenditure during the years of the commodity boom, many governments now face less favourable external conditions and need to adjust. These external headwinds mean there is more pressure to look for domestic sources of growth. As LSE prepares to host the 2018 Annual […]

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    Brazil elections 2018: the five risks facing President Bolsonaro

Brazil elections 2018: the five risks facing President Bolsonaro

Jair Bolsonaro’s remarkable rise to the presidency has already caused a significant shake-up of Brazilian politics. But in the longer term, a looming fiscal catastrophe and sky-high expectations on crime and corruption could lead to political instability or even a constitutional crisis, writes Mark S. Langevin (George Mason University).

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    Brazil elections 2018: how will Bolsonaro’s victory affect migration policy in Brazil and South America?

Brazil elections 2018: how will Bolsonaro’s victory affect migration policy in Brazil and South America?

Jair Bolsonaro’s victory in Brazil’s 2018 presidential election could lead to a more severe migration policy, attacks on migrants’ rights, and fragmentation of regional approaches to mobility, write Marcia Vera Espinoza (Queen Mary University of London) and Leiza Brumat (European University Institute).

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    Populism in Mexico and Brazil: why are voters moving in opposite directions?

Populism in Mexico and Brazil: why are voters moving in opposite directions?

Differences in ethnic makeup, religious affiliation, institutional openness to outsiders, experiences of crime, and economic performance have driven Mexican and Brazilian voters in opposite ideological directions: left towards AMLO in Mexico and right towards Bolsonaro in Brazil. But this doesn’t mean Mexico will remain immune to right populism in future, writes Rodrigo Aguilera.

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    Elites, violence, and the crisis of governance in Latin America

Elites, violence, and the crisis of governance in Latin America

Relations between the state and oligarchic elites underpin the extreme rise of violence in Latin America, despite the fact that most of its victims and perpetrators are poor: violence is as much a problem of wealth as of poverty. Jenny Pearce (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre) discusses her working paper for our new Violence, Security, and Peace series, Elites and Violence in Latin America: […]

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    Brazil elections 2018: the destabilising effects of breathtaking judicial discretion

Brazil elections 2018: the destabilising effects of breathtaking judicial discretion

The discretionary decisions and interminable in-fighting of Brazil’s vast and intricate judicial system have significant consequences for election outcomes, and 2018 is no exception, writes David Lehmann (Federal University of Bahia).